© Copyright, 2015 (PHNO)
 http://newsflash.org


PHNO HEADLINE NEWS THIS PAST WEEK
(Mini Reads followed by Full Reports below)

PNoy LAUNCHES BOOK ON 1986 PEOPLE POWER REVOLT
[The book was written by The STAR columnist Elfren Cruz and Neni Sta. Romana Cruz.]

 
NOVEMBER 28 -President Aquino visits the tomb of his father, the late senator Benigno ‘Ninoy’ Aquino Jr., on his birth anniversary at the Manila Memorial Park in Parañaque City yesterday. KRIZ JOHN ROSALES President Aquino on Thursday launched a book narrating his family’s perspective of the events that transpired during the 1986 People Power Revolution, which led to the ouster of the late dictator Ferdinand Marcos. “Everyone knows that there are different accounts of what happened (in February 1986). Those who were left-leaning at that point in time have documentation of their own struggles,” Aquino said during the launch of the book, “The Aquino Legacy: An Enduring Narrative,” at the Raffles Hotel in Makati City. “Those who were once part of the regime have released their own version of what took place at the time. Here, we have an alternative account, one that is inextricable from the life of our family,” he added. The book was written by The STAR columnist Elfren Cruz and Neni Sta. Romana Cruz. “All accounts of history are written with the personal biases and views of the authors. What is important is the fact that we are adding to the body of knowledge available at this point,” Aquino said. “We are making sure that no one is able to dictate history, and consequently, influence the thinking of the Filipinos. We are making sure that the whole picture is available as opposed to what can only be called propaganda,” he added. The book is a collection of historical accounts, commentaries and human-interest essays. It is dedicated to the youth to help them understand the lessons of martial law and the struggle to restore democracy. READ MORE...

ALSO: President Aquino, sisters offer prayers for Ninoy on 83rd birthday


NOVEMBER 27 - THIS PHOTO POSTED ON PRESIDENTIAL UNDAS, 29 OCT 2015 President Benigno S. Aquino III bows his head in prayer at the graves of his parents, Corazon and Benigno Jr. at the Manila Memorial Park in Sucat, Paranaque, during an early observance of All Souls Day for the Aquino family. MB PHOTO/FEDERICO CRUZ
President Benigno S. Aquino III bows his head in prayer at the graves of his parents, Corazon and Benigno Jr. at the Manila Memorial Park in Sucat, Paranaque, during an early observance of All Souls Day for the Aquino family on October 29, 2015. (MB File Photo by Federico Cruz) President Benigno S. Aquino III and his sisters offered prayers for their father, Benigno “Ninoy” Aquino, Jr., as the country commemorated the 83rd birth anniversary of the late senator on Friday.
President Aquino, together with Maria Elena “Ballsy” Aquino-Cruz and Victoria Elisa “Viel” Aquino-Dee, prayed the rosary before Ninoy’s tomb at the Manila Memorial Park in Parañaque City. Cruz’s husband, Eldon, was also present and took turns with his wife and Viel in praying the rosary. Pres. Aquino’s other two sisters Pinky and Kris were absent. No other program was scheduled to commemorate Ninoy’s birthday. Before leaving, Pres. Aquino offered a moment of silent prayer before his father’s tomb, which was adorned with yellow flowers. Born in 1932, Ninoy served as senator from 1967 to 1972. A staunch critic of the dictatorial leadership of the late Pres. Ferdinand Marcos, Ninoy was assassinated on Aug. 21, 1983, at the Manila International Airport, upon his return from self-exile in the United States. His death triggered several protest actions that led to the EDSA People Power Revolution in 1986, which toppled the Marcos regime and catapulted his widow, Corazon Aquino, to the presidency. FULL REPORT

ALSO THE BOOK - The Ninoy Aquino legacy: Martial law for millennials


NOVEMBER 29 -Ninoy Aquino: ‘Shining example’ ED SANTIAGO
Millennials who have no memory of martial law and the late Sen. Benigno “Ninoy” Aquino Jr. now have a book that might well be written with them in mind. READ: Why Ninoy still matters 30 years after he was murdered by the Marcos dictatorship / Ninoy Aquino remains ‘shining example’ “We have to say how (martial law) really was so that most people trying to change history will have a harder time,” President Benigno Aquino III’s sister, Pinky Aquino-Abellada, said of “The Aquino Legacy: An Enduring Narrative,” at its launch on Friday. The book, launched on the eve of what could have been the late senator’s 83rd birthday on Nov. 27, is a collection of historical accounts and commentaries based on recent interviews with personalities who worked to bring down martial law, by authors Elfren Sicangco Cruz and Neni Sta. Romana Cruz. The Cruz couple are friends “sa hirap at ginhawa (through thick and thin),” President Aquino said at the launch, adding that the book was an addition “to the body of knowledge (on martial law) available at this point.” Whole picture He added: “We are making sure that no single person is able to dictate history, and consequently, influence the thinking of Filipinos. We are making sure that the whole picture is available, as opposed to what can only be called propaganda.” Indeed, the book’s release seems to address the recent proliferation of websites and social media posts extolling the virtues of martial law and describing the era as one of prosperity and economic growth. Most of the posts were from young netizens who could not have known firsthand about the Marcos years nor experienced them personally. READ MORE...

ALSO: Workers to receive additional pay on Bonifacio Day


NOVEMBER 29 Members of the Boy Scouts of the Philippines salute a statue of Philippine hero, Andres Bonifacio at Cebu City’s Plaza Independencia. The 151st birth anniversary of Bonifacio, founder of the Katipunan movement that fought for independence from the colonial clutches of Spain for some three centuries, was marked yesterday, November 30, 2014. (Juan Carlo de Vela)
Additional pay awaits workers who will be on duty on Monday, Nov. 30, after it has been declared by Malacañang as a regular non-working holiday to celebrate the 152nd birthday of Andres Bonifacio, the Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE) said.
Labor and Employment Secretary Rosalinda Baldoz reminded employers to follow the necessary wage rule during the holiday to boost the productivity of their laborers and avoid possible sanctions. “If the day is worked, the employee is entitled to 200 percent of his or her basic wage on the first eight hours,” Baldoz said in a statement. She added that employees will also get an additional 30 percent of their hourly rate if they will work on overtime. They will also be entitled to another 30 percent of their holiday rate if the holiday also coincides with their day-off. “For work done during a regular holiday that also falls on his or her rest day, he or she shall be paid an additional 30 percent of his/her daily rate of 200 percent,” added Baldoz. For those who will opt to spend the holiday away from work, DOLE assured they will still be paid their regular pay. “In case the day immediately preceding the holiday on November 30 is a non-work day in the establishment, or is the scheduled rest day of the employee, the employee shall not be deemed on leave of absence on that day, in which case he or she shall be entitled to the regular holiday pay,” Baldoz said. Nov. 30 is traditionally declared by the government as regular holiday in recognition of Bonifacio’s contribution to the country’s independence from Spanish colonial rule. READ MORE...

ALSO: Life lessons from ‘The Great Plebeian’
[There is no love which could be greater than the love for the motherland.]


NOVEMBER 29 -This principle, embodied in Andres Bonifacio’s poem “Pag-Ibig sa Tinubuang Lupa” (Love for The Motherland), spoke of his valiant aspiration of freeing the country from the Spanish conquerors, and made Filipinos realize the true meaning of self-determination and independence. And just like the story of most Filipino heroes, he paid the price to turn those dreams into reality with his own life. While a bunch of mysteries hounded his death 118 years ago, this does not change the fact that Bonifacio, known as “The Great Plebeian,” is like the typical Filipino who constantly struggles with the hurdles of everyday life, and seeks to change the society for the better through his own little ways. Had he been alive today, Bonifacio, just like a parent, teacher or any other professional, would also have his own pieces of advice which can serve as points to ponder for everyone, in order to help introduce meaningful changes in the society. Read, read and read. Contrary to the usual perception of many that he was uneducated, Bonifacio was a home-schooled person who had sharpened his mind through reading books. Titles in his collection include “History of the French Revolution,” Eugene Sue’s “The Wandering Jew,” Dr. Jose Rizal’s “Noli Me Tangere” and “El Filibusterismo,” Victor Hugo’s “Les Miserables,” “Lives of the Presidents of the United States” and the Penal and Civil Codes and International Law. Through reading, Bonifacio understood the pitiful plight of his fellowmen. This inspired him to spearhead the battle for independence. The same must go for everyone who wants to be free from ignorance and illiteracy. Books are of great help to everyone’s intellectual revolution as it opens the mind to dynamic ideas and meaningful concepts that can help change the world. In this era where almost everything is possible in a touch of a fingertip, the prevalence of electronic books has given reading a new face and platform. However, the challenge is not just about finding time to read but also includes identifying materials which are worth reading. Former US President Harry S. Truman once said, “Not all readers are leaders but all leaders are readers.” Bonifacio has proven this through his revolutionary leadership inspired by meaningful concepts and ideas acquired through reading good books. While there are no more foreign conquerors in the land, the Filipinos now deal with a new a form of invaders: poverty and corruption. READ MORE...

ALSO: The season of Advent begins today


NOVEMBER 29 -COME YOU THANKFUL PEOPLE, COME.... The Christian Church uses the yearly cycle of Masses and prayers, broken up into liturgical seasons, to celebrate the whole mystery of Christ, the Second Person of the Holy Trinity who magnanimously decided to share in our humanity to give us human beings the possibility of sharing in His divinity. The celebration of his life and mission of redeeming mankind begins, of course, with the Incarnation–Christ’s becoming flesh in the womb of the Blessed Virgin Mary. Holy Mother Church wisely gives Christians the season of Advent to prepare for Christmas, when we commemorate Christ’s first coming to us. During the four weeks of Advent, sages and saints tell us, the Church helps us to direct our minds and hearts to make our remembrance of Our Lord’s first coming some 2,000 years ago prayerful moments of joyful waiting and expectation for His Second Coming at the end of time.Here are words about Advent from Saint Josemaria Escriva, founder of Opus Dei.He is about to arrive “Advent is here. What a marvelous time in which to renew your desire, your nostalgia, your real longing for Christ to come — for him to come every day to your soul in the Eucharist. The Church encourages us: Ecce veniet! He is about to arrive!” (The Forge) Countdown “Look up, and lift up your heads, because your redemption is at hand (Lk 21:28),” we have just read in the Gospel. This time of Advent is a time for hope. These great horizons of our Christian vocation, this unity of life built on the presence of God our Father, can and ought to be a daily reality. I don’t wish to go on any longer on this first Sunday of Advent, when we begin to count the days separating us from the birth of the Savior. We have considered the reality of our Christian vocation: how our Lord has entrusted us with the mission of attracting other souls to sanctity, encouraging them to get close to him, to feel united to the Church, to extend the kingdom of God to all hearts. Jesus wants to see us dedicated, faithful, responsive. He wants us to love him. It is his desire that we be holy, very much his own. (Christ is Passing By) READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

P-Noy launches book on 1986 People Power revolt


NOVEMBER 28 -President Aquino visits the tomb of his father, the late senator Benigno ‘Ninoy’ Aquino Jr., on his birth anniversary at the Manila Memorial Park in Parañaque City yesterday. KRIZ JOHN ROSALES

MANILA, NOVEMBER 30, 2015 (PHILSTAR) By Delon Porcalla – President Aquino on Thursday launched a book narrating his family’s perspective of the events that transpired during the 1986 People Power Revolution, which led to the ouster of the late dictator Ferdinand Marcos.

“Everyone knows that there are different accounts of what happened (in February 1986). Those who were left-leaning at that point in time have documentation of their own struggles,” Aquino said during the launch of the book, “The Aquino Legacy: An Enduring Narrative,” at the Raffles Hotel in Makati City.

“Those who were once part of the regime have released their own version of what took place at the time. Here, we have an alternative account, one that is inextricable from the life of our family,” he added.

The book was written by The STAR columnist Elfren Cruz and Neni Sta. Romana Cruz.

“All accounts of history are written with the personal biases and views of the authors. What is important is the fact that we are adding to the body of knowledge available at this point,” Aquino said.

“We are making sure that no one is able to dictate history, and consequently, influence the thinking of the Filipinos. We are making sure that the whole picture is available as opposed to what can only be called propaganda,” he added.

The book is a collection of historical accounts, commentaries and human-interest essays. It is dedicated to the youth to help them understand the lessons of martial law and the struggle to restore democracy.

READ MORE...

The President said significant events that transpired during the 20-year martial rule were included in the book, along with the “challenges my mother faced in restoring and safeguarding democracy after the Filipino people won the country back from the iron fist of the dictator.”

Aquino said the book is meant to remind the present generation of how millions of Filipinos took a stand against the dictatorship.

“My parents are perhaps the most prominent examples of that. As such, by its very nature, this book will be an intensely personal read. In documenting the events that shaped our nation, so too does it provide a closer look at our family – at the normal lives we tried to lead in spite of extremely extraordinary circumstances, and at the lessons and principles that continue to guide us to this day,” he said.

Aquino commended the authors of the book, who he said were among those who have stood by his family.

“It is remarkable to see that you continue to work with the same love for country that you showed in the days when we were fighting for the freedom of the Philippines,” he said.


MANILA BULLETIN

President Aquino, sisters offer prayers for Ninoy on 83rd birthday by Philippines News Agency November 27, 2015 (updated) Share0 Tweet0 Share0 Email0 Share3


PRESIDENTIAL UNDAS/29OCT2015 President Benigno S. Aquino III bows his head in prayer at the graves of his parents, Corazon and Benigno Jr. at the Manila Memorial Park in Sucat, Paranaque, during an early observance of All Souls Day for the Aquino family. MB PHOTO/FEDERICO CRUZ

President Benigno S. Aquino III bows his head in prayer at the graves of his parents, Corazon and Benigno Jr. at the Manila Memorial Park in Sucat, Paranaque, during an early observance of All Souls Day for the Aquino family on October 29, 2015. (MB File Photo by Federico Cruz) President Benigno S. Aquino III and his sisters offered prayers for their father, Benigno “Ninoy” Aquino, Jr., as the country commemorated the 83rd birth anniversary of the late senator on Friday.

President Aquino, together with Maria Elena “Ballsy” Aquino-Cruz and Victoria Elisa “Viel” Aquino-Dee, prayed the rosary before Ninoy’s tomb at the Manila Memorial Park in Parañaque City.

Cruz’s husband, Eldon, was also present and took turns with his wife and Viel in praying the rosary.

Pres. Aquino’s other two sisters Pinky and Kris were absent.

No other program was scheduled to commemorate Ninoy’s birthday.

Before leaving, Pres. Aquino offered a moment of silent prayer before his father’s tomb, which was adorned with yellow flowers.

Born in 1932, Ninoy served as senator from 1967 to 1972.

A staunch critic of the dictatorial leadership of the late Pres. Ferdinand Marcos, Ninoy was assassinated on Aug. 21, 1983, at the Manila International Airport, upon his return from self-exile in the United States.

His death triggered several protest actions that led to the EDSA People Power Revolution in 1986, which toppled the Marcos regime and catapulted his widow, Corazon Aquino, to the presidency.


INQUIRER

The Ninoy Aquino legacy: Martial law for millennials By: Ramon H. Royandoyan @inquirerdotnet Philippine Daily Inquirer 03:50 AM November 29th, 2015


Ninoy Aquino: ‘Shining example’ ED SANTIAGO

Millennials who have no memory of martial law and the late Sen. Benigno “Ninoy” Aquino Jr. now have a book that might well be written with them in mind.

READ: Why Ninoy still matters 30 years after he was murdered by the Marcos dictatorship / Ninoy Aquino remains ‘shining example’

“We have to say how (martial law) really was so that most people trying to change history will have a harder time,” President Benigno Aquino III’s sister, Pinky Aquino-Abellada, said of “The Aquino Legacy: An Enduring Narrative,” at its launch on Friday.

The book, launched on the eve of what could have been the late senator’s 83rd birthday on Nov. 27, is a collection of historical accounts and commentaries based on recent interviews with personalities who worked to bring down martial law, by authors Elfren Sicangco Cruz and Neni Sta. Romana Cruz.

The Cruz couple are friends “sa hirap at ginhawa (through thick and thin),” President Aquino said at the launch, adding that the book was an addition “to the body of knowledge (on martial law) available at this point.”

Whole picture

He added: “We are making sure that no single person is able to dictate history, and consequently, influence the thinking of Filipinos. We are making sure that the whole picture is available, as opposed to what can only be called propaganda.”

Indeed, the book’s release seems to address the recent proliferation of websites and social media posts extolling the virtues of martial law and describing the era as one of prosperity and economic growth.

Most of the posts were from young netizens who could not have known firsthand about the Marcos years nor experienced them personally.

READ MORE...

Alternative account

Noting the existence of historical accounts from the Left that document their struggles and triumphs during martial law, Mr. Aquino said the book offers “an alternative account, one that is inextricable from the life of our family.”

The authors can be considered insiders in President Cory Aquino’s government, with Elfren Cruz heading the Presidential Management Staff. His wife, Sta. Romana-Cruz, wrote articles critical of the Marcoses during martial law.

Both were active in the street protests that exploded after the assassination of Senator Aquino on Aug. 21, 1983, that culminated in the Marcoses’ ouster during the Edsa People Power Revolution.

READ:
Timeline: Feb. 22, 1986, Day One /
People Power Revolution Timeline, Feb. 23, 1986, Day Two /
28 key Edsa personalities /
Marcos diaries: ‘Delusions of a dictator’ /
Marcos diaries: ‘Hysteria in Manila… I must declare martial law soon’

The book wants to put things in perspective, the authors said.


THE TRIAL Aug. 27, 1973, Fort Bonifacio. Sen. Benigno Aquino “Ninoy” Aquino Jr. challenged the jurisdiction and independence of the military commission of Marcos-appointed generals and colonels. He refused to participate in the trial. On Nov. 25, 1977, the military tribunal sentenced him to die by musketry. ED SANTIAGO

Not an easy struggle

“We want to present Ninoy and Cory as figures that helped in the struggle (but) we don’t want to deify them,” Sta. Romana-Cruz said. “We’re not saying they’re flawless.”

It was also important that millennials know that the Edsa People Power Revolution “was not an easy struggle,” she added.

“It’s unfair to say that (young people) have forgotten it,” she said. “Often, they don’t know about this history because they never learned about it.”

Added Neni: “It was not just a four-day march; it was really several years in the making.”

Included in the book is a first-hand account of the noise barrage on the eve of the April 7, 1978, elections, when Senator Aquino ran against former First Lady Imelda Marcos. In an attempt to silence the “noise barrage” staged by Aquino supporters, Marcos sent out soldiers in tanks to patrol the streets, a common enough sight during the martial law years.

Predictably, the election results were a sweep for the Marcoses’ Kilusang Bagong Lipunan party.

Clarify quotes

Many years later, after the swearing in of Mrs. Aquino as the 11th and first woman President of the Philippines, the idea for the book germinated.

It served as a convenient way to correct or clarify some popular quotes attributed to the late President.

“Some say that Cory once said: ‘When I become President, there will be dancing in the streets.” (But) there are others who say that what she actually said was: ‘When I become President, there will be democracy in the streets.’ I say that when Cory Aquino became President, there was both,” Sta. Romana-Cruz said.

Lighter side

Beyond politics, the lighter side of the Cory Aquino presidency was also tackled, with a chapter devoted to youngest daughter Kris Aquino, the self-described “Oprah of the Philippines.”

“Who has a Kris Aquino business empire that encompasses product endorsements, movie and concert production, (and) entrepreneurial ventures? Can a Ninoy Aquino clone truly steer clear of politics in the future?” the book asks in a six-page treatment on the show biz Aquino titled “The Sui Generis Kris Aquino, 44.”

The interview quoted the youngest Aquino sister as saying that she plans to leave the entertainment industry at 45, in deference to her mother’s advice: “Please know when to walk away.”

It took the authors a year to write the book, as they interviewed the Aquino siblings (President Aquino and sisters Kris Aquino, Maria Elena Aquino-Cruz, Aurora Corazon Aquino-Abellada, Victoria Elisa Aquino-Dee) and the Aquino grandchildren, from the eldest Jiggy Aquino-Cruz to the youngest, Bimby Aquino-Yap.

No censorship

The family was very accommodating during the whole writing process, Sta. Romana-Cruz said. “They never censored, never asked to look at the manuscript.”

But the need to conduct more interviews or revise several chapters delayed the book’s release, which was originally targeted to coincide with the death anniversary of either President Cory or Senator Aquino.

“We decided, let’s not hurry,” said Cruz. “The next appropriate date would be Ninoy’s birthday.”

Joining the Aquino family at the launch were Cabinet members from both the first and the second Aquino administrations, among them Presidential Legal Adviser and later Supreme Court Associate Justice Adolfo S. Azcuna, then appointments secretary and later Philippine Charity Sweepstakes Office chair Margie Juico, then Radio-TV Malacañang head Maria Montelibano, Cory spokesperson Deedee Sytangco, and then Adviser on the Peace Process Ambassador Howard Dee.

Also at the event were Mr. Aquino’s Cabinet members Education Secretary Armin Luistro, Agrarian Reform Secretary Gil de los Reyes, Communications Secretary Herminio Coloma Jr., former Comelec commissioner Rene Sarmiento and Makati Business Club chair Ramon del Rosario.

Looking for another Ninoy

Documenting the years immediately before and after martial law, the book ends with the authors’ reflection on whether the Philippines will ever have “another Ninoy Aquino,” and suggests otherwise:

“When Ninoy Aquino said that the Filipino is worth dying for, surely he saw each Filipino as equal to one another. Three decades after his death, the Filipino people are still looking for another Ninoy,” the book said.

RELATED STORIES

Undelivered speech of Senator Benigno S. Aquino Jr.

Aquino scores Bongbong Marcos anew over non-apology for martial law

Antonio Luna and Ninoy Aquino–history repeating itself


MANILA BULLETIN

Workers to receive additional pay on Bonifacio Day by Samuel Medenilla November 29, 2015 Share1 Tweet0 Share0 Email0 Share14


Members of the Boy Scouts of the Philippines salute a statue of Philippine hero, Andres Bonifacio at Cebu City’s Plaza Independencia. The 151st birth anniversary of Bonifacio, founder of the Katipunan movement that fought for independence from the colonial clutches of Spain for some three centuries, was marked yesterday, November 30, 2014. (Juan Carlo de Vela)

Additional pay awaits workers who will be on duty on Monday, Nov. 30, after it has been declared by Malacañang as a regular non-working holiday to celebrate the 152nd birthday of Andres Bonifacio, the Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE) said.

Labor and Employment Secretary Rosalinda Baldoz reminded employers to follow the necessary wage rule during the holiday to boost the productivity of their laborers and avoid possible sanctions.

“If the day is worked, the employee is entitled to 200 percent of his or her basic wage on the first eight hours,” Baldoz said in a statement.

She added that employees will also get an additional 30 percent of their hourly rate if they will work on overtime. They will also be entitled to another 30 percent of their holiday rate if the holiday also coincides with their day-off.

“For work done during a regular holiday that also falls on his or her rest day, he or she shall be paid an additional 30 percent of his/her daily rate of 200 percent,” added Baldoz.

For those who will opt to spend the holiday away from work, DOLE assured they will still be paid their regular pay.

“In case the day immediately preceding the holiday on November 30 is a non-work day in the establishment, or is the scheduled rest day of the employee, the employee shall not be deemed on leave of absence on that day, in which case he or she shall be entitled to the regular holiday pay,” Baldoz said.

Nov. 30 is traditionally declared by the government as regular holiday in recognition of Bonifacio’s contribution to the country’s independence from Spanish colonial rule.


MANILA BULLETIN

Life lessons from ‘The Great Plebeian’ by Philippines News Agency November 29, 2015 (updated) Share1 Tweet0 Share0 Email0 Share4

There is no love which could be greater than the love for the motherland.

This principle, embodied in Andres Bonifacio’s poem “Pag-Ibig sa Tinubuang Lupa” (Love for The Motherland), spoke of his valiant aspiration of freeing the country from the Spanish conquerors, and made Filipinos realize the true meaning of self-determination and independence. And just like the story of most Filipino heroes, he paid the price to turn those dreams into reality with his own life.

While a bunch of mysteries hounded his death 118 years ago, this does not change the fact that Bonifacio, known as “The Great Plebeian,” is like the typical Filipino who constantly struggles with the hurdles of everyday life, and seeks to change the society for the better through his own little ways.

Had he been alive today, Bonifacio, just like a parent, teacher or any other professional, would also have his own pieces of advice which can serve as points to ponder for everyone, in order to help introduce meaningful changes in the society.

Read, read and read. Contrary to the usual perception of many that he was uneducated, Bonifacio was a home-schooled person who had sharpened his mind through reading books. Titles in his collection include “History of the French Revolution,” Eugene Sue’s “The Wandering Jew,” Dr. Jose Rizal’s “Noli Me Tangere” and “El Filibusterismo,” Victor Hugo’s “Les Miserables,” “Lives of the Presidents of the United States” and the Penal and Civil Codes and International Law.

Through reading, Bonifacio understood the pitiful plight of his fellowmen. This inspired him to spearhead the battle for independence. The same must go for everyone who wants to be free from ignorance and illiteracy. Books are of great help to everyone’s intellectual revolution as it opens the mind to dynamic ideas and meaningful concepts that can help change the world.

In this era where almost everything is possible in a touch of a fingertip, the prevalence of electronic books has given reading a new face and platform. However, the challenge is not just about finding time to read but also includes identifying materials which are worth reading.

Former US President Harry S. Truman once said, “Not all readers are leaders but all leaders are readers.” Bonifacio has proven this through his revolutionary leadership inspired by meaningful concepts and ideas acquired through reading good books.

While there are no more foreign conquerors in the land, the Filipinos now deal with a new a form of invaders: poverty and corruption.

READ MORE...

The struggle against these societal illnesses has fed up many people, prompting them to take the battle to the streets through mass actions. However, some groups take advantage of any situation in order to push forward their unscrupulous motives.

As a result, many impoverished people easily become targets of these groups. In order to make a living, they participate in these demonstrations without really knowing the essence. At the end of the day, what these people know is that they’ll get a few hundreds of pesos, a meal and they’re done with the day.

While the state clearly recognizes the right to a peaceful assembly, one should never use this right to distort the minds of the people and use them in pursuing selfish agenda.

Causing traffic congestion, spraying graffiti on public property, and hurting authorities who are exercising maximum tolerance won’t help in the pursuit for change. These senseless practices ruin Bonifacio’s selfless vision of awakening the true spirit of nationalism among Filipinos and only put his sacrifices in vain.

”A deed that is motivated by self-interest or self-pity and done without sincerity lacks nobility.” For those who are pursuing their own interests in the guise of advocating superficial change, this teaching of the Katipunan is a point to ponder on.

Bonifacio has done his part to liberate the country from conquerors. Now that the Philippines has its own sovereignty, it is up for every Filipino to continue the fight against various elements which hinder national progress.

As the government continues to do its part in providing a better quality of life for the people, one must also do his part in order to make the country a better place to live in.

Concrete contributions such as paying the right amount of taxes, following traffic rules and regulations, and respecting others’ rights are just some ways to cherish the freedom our forefathers have worked hard for.


The Andres Bonifacio Shrine (left) and the Manila City Hall (photo from wikipedia.org)

What many miss is the point of self-reflection and assessment. What can I do? How can I contribute? Truly, if these are the questions people ask before putting the blame on others, working towards nation-building will be a piece of cake.

More than remembering him through a plaza in Manila, a monument in Caloocan, and a highly-urbanized district in Taguig, commemorating Bonifacio’s legacy will be more meaningful if everyone will set aside their personal agenda and unite for the noble vision of achieving national development.

”A life that is not dedicated to a noble and divine cause is like a tree without a shade, if not, a poisonous weed.” For everyone who wants real change in the society, this principle of the Great Plebeian is a perfect thought to live by.

-----------------------------------------------------

RELATED FROM SUNSTAR ONLINE

NorMin workers push for rights, wage hike, employment Sunday, November 29, 2015 By ALWEN SALIRING



AS THE Philippines commemorates the 152nd birthday of one of the country’s heroes Andres Bonifacio, the Kilusang Mayo Uno (KMU) in Northern Mindanao holds the “Trade Union Day” protest march today.

About 200 workers gather and march to push for workers’ rights, welfare, wage hike and employment.

KMU in Northern Mindanao secretary general Wildon Barros said teachers, farmers, urban poor semi-workers, agricultural workers and other employees from different industries signified to join and support the struggle of the workforce in the country.

“Mao ni atong panawagan, like Bonifacio kaniadto kinsa usa usab ka worker, nga hangtod karun wala pa gayud matubag sa gobyerno ang nag-unang mga problema sa mga mamumuo,” Barros said.

The group has remained steadfast in its struggle demanding from the government to end contractualization, security of tenure and the P125 daily wage increase for the workers.

Barros accused the government for failing to address the labor issues because it continues serving the interests of foreign capitalists and remains negligent with the plight of the grassroots masses.

“Dili seryoso ug sinsero ang gobyerno sa pagtubag sa mga labor issues kay interest sa langyaw iyang giserbisyohan niini,” Barros said.

KMU works alongside with the Kilusang Magbubukid ng Pilipinas (KMP) in pressing for national industrialization, which he said could only be achieved through genuine agrarian reform.

The groups gather at Press Freedom Monument at the provincial capitol grounds and march toward Bonifacio Monument in Divisoria where a short program will be held.

Barros said this is also a build-up activity for a bigger mobilization for the International Human Rights Day on December 10.

Meanwhile, the Department of Labor and Employment (Dole) reminds companies on regular holiday pay rules applicable as follows:

• if the employee did not work, he/shall be paid 100 percent of his/her salary for that day.
• if the employee worked, he/she shall be paid 200 percent of his/her regular salary for the first eight hours. If the employee worked in excess of eight hours (overtime work), he/she shall be paid an additional 30 percent of his/her hourly rate on said day.
• if the employee worked during a regular holiday that also falls on his/her rest day, he/she shall be paid an additional 30 percent of his/her daily rate of 200 percent.
•If the employee worked in excess of eight hours (overtime work) during a regular holiday that also falls on his/her rest day, he/she shall be paid an additional 30 percent of his/her hourly rate on said day.


MANILA TIMES

The season of Advent begins today November 29, 2015 10:22 pm


COME YOU THANKFUL PEOPLE, COME....

The Christian Church uses the yearly cycle of Masses and prayers, broken up into liturgical seasons, to celebrate the whole mystery of Christ, the Second Person of the Holy Trinity who magnanimously decided to share in our humanity to give us human beings the possibility of sharing in His divinity.

The celebration of his life and mission of redeeming mankind begins, of course, with the Incarnation–Christ’s becoming flesh in the womb of the Blessed Virgin Mary. Holy Mother Church wisely gives Christians the season of Advent to prepare for Christmas, when we commemorate Christ’s first coming to us.

During the four weeks of Advent, sages and saints tell us, the Church helps us to direct our minds and hearts to make our remembrance of Our Lord’s first coming some 2,000 years ago prayerful moments of joyful waiting and expectation for His Second Coming at the end of time.

Here are words about Advent from Saint Josemaria Escriva, founder of Opus Dei.
He is about to arrive

“Advent is here. What a marvelous time in which to renew your desire, your nostalgia, your real longing for Christ to come — for him to come every day to your soul in the Eucharist. The Church encourages us: Ecce veniet! He is about to arrive!” (The Forge)
Countdown

“Look up, and lift up your heads, because your redemption is at hand (Lk 21:28),” we have just read in the Gospel. This time of Advent is a time for hope. These great horizons of our Christian vocation, this unity of life built on the presence of God our Father, can and ought to be a daily reality.

I don’t wish to go on any longer on this first Sunday of Advent, when we begin to count the days separating us from the birth of the Savior. We have considered the reality of our Christian vocation: how our Lord has entrusted us with the mission of attracting other souls to sanctity, encouraging them to get close to him, to feel united to the Church, to extend the kingdom of God to all hearts. Jesus wants to see us dedicated, faithful, responsive. He wants us to love him. It is his desire that we be holy, very much his own. (Christ is Passing By)

READ MORE...

The “enemies of the soul”

Today marks the beginning of Advent. And it is good for us to consider the wiles of these enemies of the soul: the disorder of sensuality and easy-going superficiality, the folly of reason that rejects God, the cavalier presumption that snuffs out love for both God and creatures. All these obstacles are real enough, and they can indeed cause us a great deal of trouble. For these very reasons the liturgy invites us to implore divine mercy: “To you, O Lord, I lift up my soul. O my God, in you I trust, let me not be put to shame; let not my enemies exult over me,” as we prayed in the Introit. And in the Offertory we shall go back to the same idea: “Let none that wait for you be put to shame.”

Now that the time of our salvation is approaching, it is consoling to hear from the lips of St Paul that “when the goodness and kindness of God our Savior appeared, he saved us, not by the works of justice which we have done, but according to his mercy” (Titus 3:5). (Christ is Passing By)

Everyone can hope to be saved

Iesus Christus, Deus homo: Jesus Christ, God-man. This is one of “the mighty works of God,” which we should reflect upon and thank him for. He has come to bring “peace on earth to men of good Will,” to all men who want to unite their wills to the holy will of God — not just the rich, not just the poor, but everyone: all the brethren. We are all brothers in Jesus, children of God, brothers of Christ. His Mother is our mother. (Christ is Passing By)


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

© Copyright, 2015 by PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE
All rights reserved


PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE [PHNO] WEBSITE