© Copyright, 2015 (PHNO)
 http://newsflash.org | APEC NOVEMBER 18 -19, 2015


PHNO HEADLINE NEWS THIS PAST WEEK
(Mini Reads followed by Full Reports below)

FRANCE BOMBS ISIS STRONGHOLD IN SYRIA; State of emergency extended for 3 months


NOVEMBER 17 -France drops 20 bombs on Islamic State jihadi training camp in revenge for Paris shootings

NOVEMBER 18 -Police forces operate in Saint-Denis, a northern suburb of Paris, Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2015. Authorities arrested seven people, while five police officers suffered minor injuries in the operation that turned into a seven-hour standoff between security forces and a group of people holed up in an apartment.Gunfire first rang out in the darkness around 4 a.m. in the streets close to where three suicide bombers had detonated their explosives outside the stadium at the start of Friday’s attacks. AP

PARIS --France launched “massive” air strikes on the Islamic State group’s de facto capital in Syria Sunday night, destroying a jihadi training camp and a munitions dump in the city of Raqqa, where Iraqi intelligence officials say the attacks on Paris were planned. Twelve aircraft, including 10 fighter jets, dropped 20 bombs in the biggest air strikes since France extended its bombing campaign against the extremist group to Syria in September, a Defense Ministry statement said. The jets were launched from sites in Jordan and the Persian Gulf, in coordination with US forces. On the sidelines of the G20 summit in Turkey on Sunday, France’s Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius said his country was justified in taking action in Syria. French prosecutors said yesterday they had identified two more Paris attackers, including a Syrian and a Frenchman who was previously charged in a “terrorist” case. A suicide bomber who blew himself up outside the Stade de France stadium is believed to be Syrian Ahmad Al Mohammad from Idlib. READ MORE...RELATED,
2 dead, 7 arrested in Paris raid ...

ALSO: State Of Emergency In France Extended 3 Months; Picture Of Surviving Terrorist Released


People pay their respects at one of the attack sites in Paris Nov. 15, 2015. Benoit Tessier/Reuters
French President Francois Hollande said Sunday he wants to extend for three months the state of emergency imposed in the wake of the deadly assaults in Paris as police released a photograph of a suspect they believe survived the attacks. The actions came as the country entered three days of official mourning for the 129 people slain in coordinated attacks by members of the Islamic State group Friday.
Le Figaro said a bill would be brought before France's cabinet Wednesday extending the state of emergency by three months. French law limits an initial state of emergency declaration to 12 days. Hollande closed France's borders in the immediate aftermath of the attacks in Paris' 10th and 11th arrondissements (districts), and numerous popular venues, including the Eiffel Tower, were closed. Schools were scheduled to open Monday with a moment of silence scheduled for noon. Meanwhile, Paris police were chasing a man believed one of the attackers through Paris' streets Sunday, the Associated Press reported. A manhunt began after an abandoned Seat Leon automobile with three AK-47s inside was found in the city suburb of Montreuil, Seine-St. Denis. READ MORE...RELATED, New ISIS Video Threatens Washington, DC: Following Paris Terror Attacks, Islamic State Says US Is Next ...

ALSO: Suspected mastermind of Paris attacks killed in police raid


NOVEMBER 20 -Abdelhamid Abaaoud (Photo from cnn.com)
The Islamic State jihadist suspected of orchestrating the Paris attacks was killed in a major police raid, prosecutors confirmed Thursday, November 19, as French lawmakers extended emergency powers imposed after the carnage. Abdelhamid Abaaoud, a Belgian of Moroccan origin linked to a series of extremist plots in Europe over the past two years, died in an assault by police units on an apartment in northern Paris. The 28-year-old Abaaoud was thought to have been in Syria, where he had boasted of planning attacks on the West, and his presence in France raised troubling questions about a breakdown in intelligence and border security. Confirmation that such a high-profile figure from the Islamic State group had managed to slip undetected into France prompted a sharp response from Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve, who demanded Europe to step up its response to the terror threat. Abaaoud was involved in four out of six attack plots foiled in France this year, he said, but Paris had received “no information” from other European countries about his arrival on the continent. “It is urgent that Europe wakes up, organizes itself and defends itself against the terrorist threat,” he added. Abaaoud was the subject of an international arrest warrant issued by Belgium, where a court had him sentenced last July, to 20 years in prison for recruiting jihadists for Syria. It was only on November 16, three days after the Paris bloodbath, that “intelligence services of a country outside Europe indicated they had knowledge of his presence in Greece,” the minister said, without specifying which country. Abaaoud was linked to a foiled April plot to attack a church near Paris, Cazeneuve said, and police were also probing possible links to a thwarted assault on a high-speed train from Amsterdam to Paris last August. READ MORE...(3) RELATED, 2 dead, 7 arrested in Paris raid; also, Ok, if bombing Syria isn't the answer, what would you do to stop the rise of Isis? and Paris attack: Isis warns 'This is just the beginning' after killing at least 127 people in French capital

ALSO A little French boy's thoughts: Little Bro’s Interview In The Wake Of The Paris Attacks Proves That 'Love Will Always Conquer Hate'


NOVEMBER 16 -Reporter interviews little French boy about what's happening in his city...ALSO WATCH VIDEO BELOW ON THIS INTERVIEW IN FRENCH. Here is the English transcript as reported by Le Petit Journal...The events that transpired in Paris on Friday were pure evil. Perpetrated by undeniably evil people, they will forever resonate with infamy and change the course of history as mankind moves forward, grappling with the notions of how and why such calculated hate was unleashed upon countless innocent lives, forever altering them as well. In the wake of the Paris terror attacks, French news broadcaster Le Petit Journal took to the Parisian streets on Monday to interview French citizens for obvious reasons. Among them were this little boy and his father, who the interviewer spoke to in the shadow of a makeshift memorial honoring the 129 people that have died and more than 350 injured. What happened in this interview is proof that love will always conquer hate. I don’t expect that many of our readers are fluent in French, so the little kid’s touching remarks are transcribed below the video in English, courtesy of the Huffington Post. The interview opens with the reporter questioning the young bro if he understands why terrorists attacked Paris. “Yes, because they’re very very very mean,” the boy replies. “The bad guys aren’t very nice. And we really have to be careful because we have to change homes.” His dad coaxes him, saying, “No, don’t worry, we don’t have to change homes. France is our home.” “But there are bad guys, Daddy!” the boy says. “Yes, but there are bad guys everywhere,” his father counters. “They have guns, they can shoot at us because they have guns and are bad,” the boy continues. “Well, they have guns, but we have flowers,” the father says. “But flowers don’t do anything,” the boy argues. “See all the flowers?” his dad asks. “They’re to fight against the guns.” “Are they there to protect?” the boy asks. “The candles too?” “There you go,” his dad says. “It’s to not forget those who left us yesterday.” “The flowers and the candles,” the boy concludes, “they’re there to protect us.” The reporter jumps back in and asks the boy, “So are you feeling better?” “Yep,” he says. I’m feeling better.” THE FULL REPORT... WATCH ON VIDEO...\

ALSO: Paris victims remembered in Manila


NOVEMBER 18 -A Frenchwoman lights candles in front of an Eiffel Tower replica outside the Alliance Francais during a memorial for the victims of the Paris attacks in Makati City the other night. AP
MANILA, Philippines - Victims of the terror attacks in Paris were remembered in a commemoration ceremony organized by the French embassy in Manila on Monday. French Ambassador Thierry Mathou said the deadly attacks in France were committed by terrorists who attacked the office of French magazine Charlie Hebdo in January, which was an attack against a symbol of freedom of expression. “Unlike what happened in January, when terrorists attacked a symbol of freedom of expression, today it is our right to life, our very right to exist peacefully, that was targeted,” Mathou said during the vigil at the Alliance Francaise de Manille in Makati City. “As you are well aware of, those heinous crimes have sadly claimed many lives and injured even more innocent people,” he added. Mathou stressed that to be able to co-exist is the very basis of humanity as opposed to barbarity, and that “France will always fight against extremism and defend the values of democracy and human rights.” “These terrorist acts are not only attacks against France, but against civilization itself. The values of civilization are enshrined in France’s national motto ‘Liberte, Egalite, Fraternite.’ But they are also universal values. It is our common responsibility to defend them,” he said.THE FULL REPORT.

ALSO: The Full Summary -"War In Paris" - ISIS Claims Responsibility For Deadly Attacks Killing 127


NOVEMBER 14 -By Tyler Durden's picture Submitted
The morning after a truly tragic Friday the 13th, France wakes up to the following front pages, among which one which best captures the atmosphere in Paris at this moment: "war in Paris":

 
NOVEMBER 14 -Here is the latest summary of the aftermath from last night's six distinct attacks across Paris, compiled from numerous media outlets: ●At least 127 people are feared to have been killed according to French president Hollande in a series of devastating attacks across Paris. ●Among the dead are at least two Belgians, two Romanians and a Swedish citizen, with UK prime minister David Cameron warning British casualties are likely. ●Eight attackers also died, police say, seven of them by detonating explosive suicide belts.●Police continue to search for accomplices who might still be at large. ●Two hundred people were injured, 80 of them seriously. ●Shootings and explosions were reported in six locations across the city, including the Stade de France in northern Paris, where two suicide attacks and a bombing took place as the national team played Germany in a friendly football match. ●The majority of victims died after a mass shooting inside the Bataclan concert venue. Shootings also took place in restaurants and other sites in the centre of the city. ●President François Hollande, who was at the Stade de France at the time of the assaults, said: "We are going to lead a war which will be pitiless. Because when terrorists are capable of committing such atrocities they must be certain that they are facing a determined France, a united France, a France that is together and does not let itself be moved, even if today we express infinite sorrow." ●A state of emergency has been declared across France and security at the country’s borders has been tightened. Paris residents have been told to stay in their homes and authorities say “all of the city’s amenities”, including schools, universities, museums, libraries, gyms, swimming pools and markets, will close on Saturday. ●US president Barack Obama described the atrocities as “an attack on all of humanity”. Australian prime minister Malcolm Turnbull said the attack “appears to have all the hallmarks of a Daesh [Islamic State] exercise”. CONTINUE READING...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

France bombs ISIS stronghold in Syria


France drops 20 bombs on Islamic State jihadi training camp in revenge for Paris shootings

PARIS, MANILA, NOVEMBER 23, 2015 (PHILSTAR)  (Associated Press)- France launched “massive” air strikes on the Islamic State group’s de facto capital in Syria Sunday night, destroying a jihadi training camp and a munitions dump in the city of Raqqa, where Iraqi intelligence officials say the attacks on Paris were planned.

Twelve aircraft, including 10 fighter jets, dropped 20 bombs in the biggest air strikes since France extended its bombing campaign against the extremist group to Syria in September, a Defense Ministry statement said. The jets were launched from sites in Jordan and the Persian Gulf, in coordination with US forces.

On the sidelines of the G20 summit in Turkey on Sunday, France’s Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius said his country was justified in taking action in Syria.

French prosecutors said yesterday they had identified two more Paris attackers, including a Syrian and a Frenchman who was previously charged in a “terrorist” case.

A suicide bomber who blew himself up outside the Stade de France stadium is believed to be Syrian Ahmad Al Mohammad from Idlib.

READ MORE...


French President Francois Hollande, center, flanked by French Prime Minister Manuel Valls, right, and French Education Minister Najat Vallaud-Belkacem, center left, stands among students during a minute of silence in the courtyard of the Sorbonne University in Paris, Monday, Nov. 16 2015. A minute of silence was observed throughout the country in memory of the victims of last Friday's attack. (Guillaume Horcajuelo, Pool via AP)

A statement from the prosecutor’s office said the Syrian passport found in that name near the body “remains to be verified,” but that fingerprints matched those taken in Greece in October.

The second was 28-year-old Samy Amimour, from the suburb of Drancy outside Paris. He was involved in the massacre of 89 people in the Bataclan concert hall, one of a spate of attacks on nightlife spots late on Friday which left 129 dead and hundreds injured.

Amimour “is known to anti-terrorist investigators for being charged on Oct. 19, 2012 for conspiracy to commit terrorism” over a planned attack in Yemen that was foiled.

He violated his judicial supervision in 2013, prompting judges to issue an international arrest warrant.

His family told AFP, in an interview before Friday’s attacks in Paris took place, that he had gone to Syria in 2013.

Three members of Amimour’s family were taken into custody early on Monday, said the statement.

7 arrested Police announced seven arrests and hunted more members of the sleeper cell that carried out the Paris attacks that killed 129 people. French officials said several key suspects had been stopped and released by police after the attack.

The arrest warrant for Salah Abdeslam, a 26-year-old born in Brussels, calls him “very dangerous” and warns people not to intervene if they see him.

Yet police already had him in their grasp early Saturday, when they stopped a car carrying three men near the Belgian border. By then, hours had passed since authorities identified Abdeslam as the renter of a Volkswagen Polo that carried hostage takers to the Paris theater where many died.

Three French police officials and a top French security official confirmed that officers let Abdeslam go after checking his ID. They spoke on condition of anonymity, lacking authorization to publicly disclose such details.

Clues about the extent of the plot have emerged from Baghdad, where senior Iraqi officials told the Associated Press that France and other countries had been warned on Thursday of an imminent attack.

An Iraqi intelligence dispatch warned that Islamic State group leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi had ordered his followers to immediately launch gun and bomb attacks and take hostages inside the countries of the coalition fighting them in Iraq and Syria.

The Iraqi dispatch, which was obtained by the AP, provided no details on when or where the attack would take place, and a senior French security official told the AP that French intelligence gets these kinds of warnings “all the time” and “every day.”

However, Iraqi intelligence officials told the AP that they also warned France about specific details: Among them, that the attackers were trained for this operation and sent back to France from Raqqa, the Islamic State’s de-facto capital.

The officials also said that a sleeper cell in France then met with the attackers after their training and helped them to execute the plan. There were 24 people involved in the operation, they said: 19 attackers and five others in charge of logistics and planning.

None of these details have been corroborated by officials of France or other Western intelligence agencies.

All these French and Iraqi security and intelligence officials spoke with the AP on condition of anonymity, citing the ongoing investigation.

Abdeslam is one of three brothers believed to be involved. One who crossed with him into Belgium was later arrested, and another blew himself up inside the Bataclan theater after taking the audience hostage and firing on them repeatedly. It was the worst of Friday’s synchronized attacks, leaving 89 fatalities and hundreds of people wounded inside.

IS mock France’s air strikes The IS group claimed responsibility. Its statement mocked France’s air attacks on suspected IS targets in Syria and Iraq, and called Paris “the capital of prostitution and obscenity.”

In all, three teams of attackers, including seven suicide bombers. attacked the national stadium, the concert hall and nearby nightspots. The attacks wounded 350 people, 99 of them seriously.

Abdeslam rented the black Volkswagen Polo used by the hostage-takers, another French security official said. A Brussels parking ticket found inside led police to at least one of the arrests in Belgium, a French police official said.

Three Kalashnikovs were found inside another car known to have been used in the attacks that was found in Montreuil, an eastern Parisian suburb, another a French police official said.

As many as three of the seven suicide bombers were French citizens, as was at least one of the men arrested in the Molenbeek neighborhood of Brussells, which authorities consider to be a focal point for extremists and fighters going to Syria from Belgium.


IBTIMES.COM

State Of Emergency In France Extended 3 Months; Picture Of Surviving Terrorist Released By Marcy Kreiter @marcykreiter m.kreiter@ibtimes.com on November 15 2015 12:39 PM EST Share on facebook 54 Share on twitterShare on linkedin 3 Share on google_plusone_shareMore Sharing Services 2 memorial


People pay their respects at one of the attack sites in Paris Nov. 15, 2015. Benoit Tessier/Reuters

French President Francois Hollande said Sunday he wants to extend for three months the state of emergency imposed in the wake of the deadly assaults in Paris as police released a photograph of a suspect they believe survived the attacks. The actions came as the country entered three days of official mourning for the 129 people slain in coordinated attacks by members of the Islamic State group Friday.

Le Figaro said a bill would be brought before France's cabinet Wednesday extending the state of emergency by three months. French law limits an initial state of emergency declaration to 12 days.

Hollande closed France's borders in the immediate aftermath of the attacks in Paris' 10th and 11th arrondissements (districts), and numerous popular venues, including the Eiffel Tower, were closed. Schools were scheduled to open Monday with a moment of silence scheduled for noon.

Meanwhile, Paris police were chasing a man believed one of the attackers through Paris' streets Sunday, the Associated Press reported. A manhunt began after an abandoned Seat Leon automobile with three AK-47s inside was found in the city suburb of Montreuil, Seine-St. Denis.

READ MORE...

French police issued an alert and released a photo of the suspect. He was identified as Abdeslam Salah.

Police said the body of a second suicide bomber found at the Bataclan theater was identified as one of three brothers. One brother was arrested in Belgium before being released, but there was no immediate word about the other brother. An international arrest warrant was issued, Le Figaro reported.

Seven people were in custody in France, and at least five others reportedly were detained in Belgium. Two of the Paris attackers had lived in Belgium, the Belgium federal prosecutor said Sunday. Belgian Justice Minister Koen Geens acknowledged a car found abandoned near the Bataclan concert venue had been rented in Belgium.

Thousands of people around the world gathered to mourn Paris' dead, and memorials were set up in various places with candles, flowers and messages.

A memorial ceremony was scheduled for the Grande Synagogue de la Victoire in Paris, Jewish leaders said. And a special Mass was set for Notre Dame Cathedral in the city.

----------------------------------------------------

RELATED FROM IBTIMES.COM

New ISIS Video Threatens Washington, DC: Following Paris Terror Attacks, Islamic State Says US Is Next By Jess McHugh @McHughJess j.mchugh@ibtimes.com on November 16 2015 8:47 AM EST Share on facebook 4k Share on twitterShare on linkedinShare on google_plusone_shareMore Sharing Services 14 ISIS militant


The Islamic terror group known as the Islamic State and ISIS has reportedly threatened Washington, D.C., in a new video. Reuters

The Islamic extremist militant group known as the Islamic State and ISIS released a video Monday threatening Washington, D.C., with terror attacks, following Friday's attacks in Paris, France, that killed 129 people and wounded several hundred more.

Militants wearing scarves spoke to the camera in the video, threatening that the U.S. would “suffer the same fate” as France. "We say to the states that part in the crusader campaign that, by God, you will have a day God willing, like France's and by God, as we struck France in the center of its abode in Paris, then we swear that we will strike America at its center in Washington," one militant said in the video, as reported by the Independent.

News of the video came as leaders around the U.S. stepped up their response to the Paris attacks, saying the nation needed to heighten security before another attack like Sept. 11, 2001 occurred, when a series of coordinated assaults on U.S. landmarks by al-Qaeda terrorists killed 3,000 people.


FROM INSIDER.FOXNEWS.COM SEPTEMBER 23, 2014

"I'm trying to protect America from another 9/11, and without American boots on the ground in Syria and Iraq, we're gonna get hit here at home," Sen. Lindsey Graham, a Republican presidential candidate from South Carolina, told CNN’s New Day Monday morning. "And if you don't understand that, you're not ready to be commander-in-chief in my view,” he said.

The U.S. has been conducting airstrikes in Syria targeting ISIS since 2014, attacking 2,600 targets according to the New York Times. Graham advocated for more military intervention in Syria, calling for 10,000 U.S. boots on the ground. President Barack Obama said in October he would send a few dozen special forces to the region.


Hitting ISIS Where It Hurts By Striking Oil Trucks Updated November 19, 20154:25 PM ET Jackie Northam. A member of the Syrian government forces stands next to a well at Jazel oil field, near the ancient city of Palmyra, after they retook the area from the Islamic State in March. U.S.-led airstrikes have targeted oil facilities run by ISIS, which, according to some estimates, earns as much as $1 million per day from oil sales. STR/AFP/Getty Images

"There is a 9/11 coming, and it is coming from Syria if we don't disrupt their operation inside of Syria," said Graham.

Social media users said they were taking the threat seriously.


MANILA BULLETIN

Suspected mastermind of Paris attacks killed in police raid by AFP November 20, 2015 (updated) Share0 Tweet0 Share0 Email0 Share0


Abdelhamid Abaaoud (Photo from cnn.com)

The Islamic State jihadist suspected of orchestrating the Paris attacks was killed in a major police raid, prosecutors confirmed Thursday, November 19, as French lawmakers extended emergency powers imposed after the carnage.

Abdelhamid Abaaoud, a Belgian of Moroccan origin linked to a series of extremist plots in Europe over the past two years, died in an assault by police units on an apartment in northern Paris.

The 28-year-old Abaaoud was thought to have been in Syria, where he had boasted of planning attacks on the West, and his presence in France raised troubling questions about a breakdown in intelligence and border security.

Confirmation that such a high-profile figure from the Islamic State group had managed to slip undetected into France prompted a sharp response from Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve, who demanded Europe to step up its response to the terror threat.

Abaaoud was involved in four out of six attack plots foiled in France this year, he said, but Paris had received “no information” from other European countries about his arrival on the continent.

“It is urgent that Europe wakes up, organizes itself and defends itself against the terrorist threat,” he added.

Abaaoud was the subject of an international arrest warrant issued by Belgium, where a court had him sentenced last July, to 20 years in prison for recruiting jihadists for Syria.

It was only on November 16, three days after the Paris bloodbath, that “intelligence services of a country outside Europe indicated they had knowledge of his presence in Greece,” the minister said, without specifying which country.

Abaaoud was linked to a foiled April plot to attack a church near Paris, Cazeneuve said, and police were also probing possible links to a thwarted assault on a high-speed train from Amsterdam to Paris last August.

READ MORE...

As the Paris probe widened to countries across Europe, Belgian police arrested nine people in Brussels, seven of them in raids linked to a suicide bomber who blew himself up outside the French national stadium during the attacks, prosecutors said.

Italy was also hunting five suspects after an FBI tip-off about possible jihadist attacks on landmark sites including St Peter’s Cathedral in the Vatican, the foreign minister said.

Paris prosecutor Francois Molins said handprint analysis was used to confirm the identity of Abaaoud’s body, which was found riddled with bullets in the rubble of the shattered building in Saint-Denis following a seven-hour police siege.

Molins said it was not yet clear whether Abaaoud blew himself up. Another body of a woman was found after the ferocious shootout, believed to be his cousin who detonated an explosives vest.

Eight suspects were arrested in the massive Saint-Denis raid, which took place after authorities received a tip-off about Abaaoud, but another key suspect, Salah Abdeslam, remains unaccounted for.


NOVEMBER 16, 2015 PHOTO -Salah Abdeslam, left, was on the run last night; Omar Mustefai, topright, was among the killers at the Bataclan concert hall; the passport of Ahmad Almohammad, above, was found next to a Stade de France suicide bomber. Police across Europe were hunting last night for a 26-year-old Belgian who is thought to have been the only gunman to have escaped from the massacres in Paris in which 129 people were killed and more than 350 wounded.

Abdeslam is thought to be one of the only surviving members of the group of assailants behind the Paris massacre. His suicide-bomber brother Brahim Abdeslam blew himself up at a café without killing anyone.

Prime Minister Manuel Valls hailed Abaaoud’s death but warned that France still faced threats as lawmakers voted to extend an extraordinary package of security measures for three months.

“We must not rule anything out. There is also the risk from chemical or biological weapons,” Valls said.

The measures include allowing police to carry weapons when they are off duty and use them in the event of an attack, providing they wear a police armband to avoid any confusion, according to a directive.

French lawmakers also voted to give the government the power to block websites and social media accounts promoting or inciting terrorist acts.

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RELATED FROM THE INQUIRER

2 dead, 7 arrested in Paris raid SHARES: 72 VIEW COMMENTS @inquirerdotnet 12:35 AM November 19th, 2015


Police forces operate in Saint-Denis, a northern suburb of Paris, Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2015. Authorities arrested seven people, while five police officers suffered minor injuries in the operation that turned into a seven-hour standoff between security forces and a group of people holed up in an apartment.Gunfire first rang out in the darkness around 4 a.m. in the streets close to where three suicide bombers had detonated their explosives outside the stadium at the start of Friday’s attacks. AP

PARIS—A woman wearing an explosive suicide vest blew herself up and a suspected jihadist was killed on Wednesday during a huge police assault in Paris targeting the suspected mastermind of last week’s attacks in the French capital.

Gunfire and explosions rocked the Saint-Denis area in the north of the capital near the Stade de France stadium from before dawn as terrified residents were evacuated or told to stay in their homes.

Authorities arrested seven people, while five police officers suffered minor injuries in the operation that turned into a seven-hour standoff between security forces and a group of people holed up in an apartment.

Gunfire first rang out in the darkness around 4 a.m. in the streets close to where three suicide bombers had detonated their explosives outside the stadium at the start of Friday’s attacks.

Paris prosecutor Francois Molins said telephone surveillance and witness reports “led us to believe” that Abdelhamid Abaaoud, the suspected mastermind of Friday’s series of attacks in Paris that killed 129 people, had been in the apartment.

But Molins added that it was too early to say if he was among those arrested or killed.
Abaaoud is an Islamic State (IS) group fighter who was previously thought to be in Syria after fleeing raids in his native Belgium earlier this year.

Exchange of fire

Residents of the Paris suburb, some of whom were evacuated in their underwear, said they had been caught in a terrifying exchange of fire.

Hayat, 26, had been leaving a friend’s apartment where she had spent the night when the shots erupted.

“I heard gunfire,” she said. “I could have been hit by a bullet. I never thought terrorists could have hid here.”

Another witness, Amine Guizani, said he heard the sound of grenades and automatic gunfire.

“They were shooting for an hour. Nonstop. There were grenades. It was going, stopping. Kalashnikovs. Starting again,” Guizani said.

Sporadic bangs and explosions continued, and at 7:30 a.m. at least seven explosions shook the center of Saint-Denis.

Ninth suspect

The raid came after footage from the scene of one of the Paris attacks revealed a ninth suspect may have taken part.

It is known that seven were killed in the carnage on Friday, most after detonating suicide belts.

It was not clear if the ninth man was one of two suspected accomplices detained in Belgium or was still on the run, potentially with 26-year-old fugitive Frenchman Salah Abdeslam who took part in the attacks with his suicide-bomber brother Brahim.

Police also carried out multiple raids in southwest France. The operations were part of an antiterrorism strategy but not directly linked to the Paris attacks, an investigator said.

Extending the emergency|

French President Francois Hollande was to hold discussions on Wednesday on extending to three months the state of emergency declared after the worst attacks in French history. Lawmakers will vote on the proposal on Thursday and Friday.

As police stepped up the hunt for the fugitives, French and Russian jets pounded IS targets in the group’s Syrian stronghold of Raqqa for a third consecutive day.

A monitoring group said the French and Russian air strikes had killed at least 33 IS jihadists in the last 72 hours.

France and Russia have vowed merciless retaliation for the Paris attacks and last month’s bombing of a Russian airliner over the Egyptian Sinai peninsula that killed 229 people and was also claimed by IS.

The French aircraft carrier Charles de Gaulle steamed from the southern port of Toulon on Wednesday, heading for the eastern Mediterranean to participate in intensified air strikes against IS targets.

Restoring ties


President Vladimir Putin has ordered the Russian navy in the Mediterranean to establish contact with its French counterparts and work together 'as allies' in a campaign against the Islamic State group in Syria Putin on Tuesday instructed his military to work out a joint Russian-French action plan against IS militants as he pushes the idea of establishing a broad anti-IS coalition that would involve both Russia and the West. 'It's necessary to establish direct contact with the French and work with them as allies,' Putin told the military top brass at a meeting after French President Francois Hollande said the French aircraft carrier Charles de Gaulle would be deployed to the eastern Mediterranean. SKYNEW.COM.AU

Russian President Vladimir Putin on Tuesday said “it’s necessary to establish direct contact with the French and work with them as allies.”

The attacks have galvanized international resolve to destroy the jihadist group and end Syria’s more than four-year civil war, while potentially restoring ties between Russia and France that had collapsed since last year’s Ukraine crisis.

Hollande will meet Putin in Moscow on Nov. 26, two days after seeing US President Barack Obama in Washington.

In a sign of the nervousness gripping Europe after Friday’s carnage in Paris, a football match between Germany and the Netherlands in Hanover was canceled on Tuesday and the crowd evacuated after police acted on a “serious” bomb threat.

Condemning terrorism

The body representing Muslims in France said it would ask all 2,500 mosques in the country to condemn “all forms of violence or terrorism” in prayers this Friday.

The message will condemn such acts “unambiguously,” said the French Muslim Council (CFCM).

France has invoked a previously unused European Union article to ask member states for help in its mission to fight back against IS, which received unanimous backing from Brussels.

The alliance comes as international players meet to discuss ways of ending the Syrian war, which has spurred the rise of IS, forced millions into exile and triggered Europe’s worst migrant crisis since World War II.

On a solidarity visit to Paris, US Secretary of State John Kerry said a “big transition” in Syria was probably only weeks away after Iran, Russia and Saudi Arabia reached agreement at the weekend on a path toward elections.

Highlighting US fears over the attack, two Air France flights bound for Paris from the United States were diverted on Tuesday and landed safely after anonymous threats that the carrier described as a “bomb scare.”
Reports from AFP and AP

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RELATED FROM STOPWAR.ORG UK

Ok, if bombing Syria isn't the answer, what would you do to stop the rise of Isis? Ian Sinclair 23 July 2015. Posted in News

Given the horrifying record of UK interventions in the Middle East, it’s extraordinary that military action is now being considered in Syria.

On 26 June, Seifeddine Rezgui, a 23-year-old student, murdered 38 people at a beach resort in Sousse, Tunisia. 30 of the dead were British nationals. Subsequent news reports have noted Rezgui received training at an Islamic State (IS – also known as ISIS) base in western Libya.

Speaking to the BBC a few days later, David Cameron argued IS was an ‘existential threat’ to the United Kingdom which required a ‘full spectrum response.’

Building on the prime minister’s inflammatory language, on 1 July, defence secretary Michael Fallon announced the government would likely seek parliamentary support to extend the current UK bombing of IS in Iraq to Syria.

The discussion in the mainstream media about the proposed intervention has been predictably narrow, focusing on questions of tactics and strategy. Will airstrikes be effective? Who will the UK airstrikes help on the ground? Is the Syrian conflict too complex to intervene?

These concerns – what could be called the ‘fight the war better’ school of criticism – certainly deserve serious consideration. However, there are a number of important arguments and facts that are conspicuously absent from the ongoing debate taking place within the media and political elite.

No to war

Considering the horrifying record of UK military interventions in the Middle East since 2001, it’s extraordinary that further military action is now being seriously considered in Syria. The UK – fighting alongside the US and other allies – has decimated Afghanistan, Iraq and Libya, killing and wounding hundreds of thousands of people and leaving whole swathes of the Muslim world seething with hatred at the actions of the West.

It is widely acknowledged that the US-UK invasion of Iraq in 2003, and the subsequent occupation, played a central role in the creation of IS.

‘We definitely put fuel on a fire. Absolutely’, retired US army general Mike Flynn, head of the defence intelligence agency until August 2014, told Al-Jazeera when asked about the invasion of Iraq and IS.

In August 2014, the New York Times reported that the leader of IS spent five years in a US prison in Iraq ‘where, like many ISIS fighters now on the battlefield, he became more radicalised’. General Flynn agrees that the US prison system in Iraq ‘absolutely’ helped to radicalise Iraqis who later joined al-Qa’eda in Iraq and the group that became Islamic State.

Asked by Al Jazeera English’s Mehdi Hasan if drone strikes tend to create more terrorists than they kill, Flynn, who had a key role in secret US drone operations, replied: ‘I don’t disagree with that’.

Moreover, an expansion of UK airstrikes on IS would be playing into IS’s overall strategy.

With the Sousse attack likely targeting British nationals (the hotel attacked was well known as a British holiday destination, and the gunman ignored local people), Paul Rogers, professor of Peace Studies at the University of Bradford, argues that the attack was an attempt by IS to provoke a response. ‘Its strongest recruiting tactic is to present itself as the one true guardian of Islam under attack from “crusader” forces’, Rogers notes.

The Western attacks on Afghanistan, Iraq, Libya, Pakistan, Yemen and Somalia – and the airstrikes on IS since September 2014 – fit this narrative perfectly. Turning to possible responses to IS, Rogers contends ‘the best advice, as with al-Qaida over more than a decade, is not to do what it wants you to do.’

According to the US military, their air campaign against IS has so far struck over 7,000 targets, killing 1,000 IS fighters every month. However, Rogers notes, IS ‘has not only survived these attacks but in many places is thriving, attracting up to a thousand new recruits from across the region and beyond’. This is because, as Rogers intimates above, the Western airstrikes themselves – which no doubt kill civilians – act as a recruiting sergeant for IS.

This was confirmed by James Comey, the director of FBI, who told congress in September 2014 that the US bombing of ISIS in Iraq had increased support for the group.

In a joint bulletin issued that same month to local, state and federal law enforcement, the department of homeland security and the FBI warned that while ‘single events generally do not provoke an immediate response’ from homegrown extremists, ‘we believe these [US air]strikes will contribute to homegrown violent extremists’… broader grievances about U.S. military intervention in predominantly Muslim lands, possibly motivating Homeland attacks’.

In terms of self-interest, broadening the UK war on IS to Syria will increase the likelihood of more terrorist attacks on British people – something the government claims it wants to reduce.

Finally, though Cameron’s spokeswoman was quoted by the Guardian as saying that military strikes in Syria would be legal under international law due to the threat posed by IS to the British people, this is almost certainly incorrect.

Marc Weller, professor of international law at the University of Cambridge, dismisses this argument, noting that although the UK ‘might argue that IS represents a manifest threat to their own security’ this is contradicted by Article 51 of the UN Charter which says ‘self-defence only applies to actual or imminent armed attacks, rather than potential or possible attacks.’

What could work?

There are many actions the UK government could take, short of military action, that would significantly reduce the power of Islamic State, the suffering their rise has caused, and the terrorist threat to the UK.

With the conflict causing a massive humanitarian crisis, the UK should massively increase its support for aid to the region. ‘Quite apart from the humanitarian imperative, there is the risk of greatly increased bitterness on the part of hundreds of thousands if not millions of people displaced from their homes’, Rogers says.

Britain could reverse its policies in relation to Syria. In addition to providing support to the armed rebellion in Syria, Hugh Roberts, the former head of the North African section at the International Crisis Group, recently explained, the US and UK have ‘sabotaged the efforts of the UN special envoys… to broker a political compromise that would have ended the fighting’.

Rather than helping to escalate and lengthen the conflict in Syria, the UK should pressure the key actors to agree a negotiated end to the fighting, which would reduce the chaotic and violent conditions that IS thrives in.

In Iraq, the UK should apply pressure on the Iraqi government to end the sectarian policies it has been pursuing, which have been pushing large numbers of Sunni Iraqis to support IS as a defence against the Iraqi state.

With Rezgui reportedly attending an IS training camp in Libya, the UK should fully support international efforts to stabilise Libya – a chaotic mess allowing jihadis to freely operate, in large part, because of the NATO intervention in 2011.

Dr Lina Khatib, director of the Carnegie Middle East Center in Beirut, notes that Turkey has turned a blind eye to IS freely moving fighters and materials across the Turkish border into Iraq and Syria. As a NATO member largely armed by the West, diplomatic pressure should be applied to Turkey to immediately close the border to IS.

Diplomatic pressure should also be applied to the Gulf states to push them to clamp down on their citizens funding and supporting IS.

Finally, if any external military action is needed to combat IS or to keep the peace, then the UK should push for this to be done under the authority of the United Nations – an organisation that seems to have been forgotten by everyone discussing how to respond to IS. And if UN troops are deployed there should be minimal involvement from the Western nations who have done so much to destablise the Middle East in recent years and create the conditions for IS to grow so quickly.

Of course, the UK government’s geopolitical interests and alliances in the region and beyond mean they are likely to continue to follow their current counterproductive militaristic actions and are unlikely to implement sincerely these alternative non-military policies. And with the Labour Party having signaled they are sympathetic to the government’s proposal there is unlikely to be strong opposition in parliament (though Labour have said they will make their final decision after their new leader is elected in September 2015).

Therefore, it is up to the anti-war movement and peace activists to apply pressure on both the government and the Labour Party to force their hand.

In the immediate future there needs to be strong opposition to the proposed UK bombing of Syria, while in the longer-term there needs to be a push for non-military solutions to the wider conflict.

Source: Peace News

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RELATED FROM THE INDEPENDENT.CO.UK

Paris attack: Isis warns 'This is just the beginning' after killing at least 127 people in French capital Lizzie Dearden @lizziedearden Sunday 15 November 201518 comments 


Paris attack: Isis has created a new kind of warfare For the first time urban terrorism, guerrilla tactics and conventional fighting have been combined in a lethal blend. IN THIS PHOTO: Kurdish Peshmerga forces flash the victory sign as they enter the northern Iraqi town of Sinjar. These developments on the battlefields of Iraq and Syria may seem distant from the butchery in the heart of Paris. But it is important to understand that Isis is an effective fighting machine because its military skills, evolved during years of fighting, are a potent blend of urban terrorism, guerrilla tactics and conventional warfare. Its blitzkrieg advances in Iraq in the summer of 2014 were preceded by a wave of suicide bombings using vehicles packed with explosives in Shia districts of Baghdad and central Iraq. The aim was to keep its enemies frightened and off balance and to show to potential supporters that Isis was a power in the land. INDEPENDENT.CO.UK FILE

Militants claimed the shootings and suicide bombings were revenge for 'crusade' against Isis

Isis has claimed that the suicide bombings and shootings that killed at least 127 people in Paris were just the “beginning of the storm”.

The group’s propaganda arm released statements in Arabic and French claiming the “blessed battle” was an act of revenge for France’s involvement in the US-led coalition bombing its militants in Iraq and Syria.

An audio message was also released in English of the same statement, read by a supporter speaking with an American accent.

“A group of believers from the soldiers of the Caliphate set out targeting the capital of prostitution and vice, the lead carrier of the cross in Europe, Paris,” he said.

Isis has created a new kind of warfare with its attacks on Paris “They divorced worldly life and advanced towards their enemy hoping to killed for Allah’s sake…and his allies.

“Allah granted victory upon their hands and cast terror into the hearts of the crusaders in their very own homeland.”

Isis’ statement said eight “brothers” were armed with assault rifles and wearing explosives belts that they detonated when their ammunition ran out.

Saying the targets were “precisely chosen”, the group described the sold-out Eagles of Death Metal gig where the majority of victims were shot dead as the “hundreds of pagans gathered for a concert of prostitution and vice”.

Isis noted Francois Hollande’s presence in the Stade de France for the football match between Germany and France, where two suicide bombers detonated their vests.

The statement continued: “Let France and all nations following its path know that they will continue to be at the top of the target list for the Islamic State and that the scent of death will not leave their nostrils as long as they partake part in the crusader campaign…and boast about their war against Islam in France, and their strikes against Muslims in the lands of the Caliphate with their jets.

“This is just the beginning of the storm.”

The statement contained several inaccuracies, claiming that 200 people were killed and listing shootings in the 18th arrondissement, where there was no attack.

READ MORE...

Isis also released an undated video today threatening to attack France if it continued intervention in Iraq and Syria.

“As long as you keep bombing you will not live in peace. You will even fear traveling to the market,” said one of the militants, identified as “Abu Maryam the Frenchman”.

The militants, who appeared to be French citizens, sat cross-legged in a group wearing military fatigues and brandishing guns, while burning passports.

Paris-flowers-AFP.jpg Parisians lay flowers at the Place de la Republique “You have been ordered to fight the infidel wherever you find him - what are you waiting for? There are weapons and cars available and targets ready to be hit,” said Abu Maryam.

Another militant, identified as “Abu Salman the Frenchman”, said: “Even poison is available, so poison the water and food of at least one of the enemies of Allah.

”Terrorise them and do not allow them to sleep due to fear and horror.”

French President Francois Hollande said on Saturday the attacks in Paris were “an act of war” organised by Isis militants abroad with internal help.

Mr Hollande said the French army and security forces were mobilised “at the highest possible level” and insisted France would “triumph over barbarity”.

“What we are defending is our country, but more than that, it is our values,” he added.

Additional reporting by Reuters


BROBIBLE.COM

Little Bro’s Interview In The Wake Of The Paris Attacks Proves That Love Will Always Conquer Hate BY MATTHEW BIRL • 11.16.15 TWEET | LIKE16 LittleBoyParisTerror LE PETIT JOURNAL


Reporter interviews little French boy about what's happening in his city...ALSO WATCH VIDEO BELOW ON THIS INTERVIEW IN FRENCH.

Here is the English transcript as reported by Le Petit Journal...

The events that transpired in Paris on Friday were pure evil. Perpetrated by undeniably evil people, they will forever resonate with infamy and change the course of history as mankind moves forward, grappling with the notions of how and why such calculated hate was unleashed upon countless innocent lives, forever altering them as well.

In the wake of the Paris terror attacks, French news broadcaster Le Petit Journal took to the Parisian streets on Monday to interview French citizens for obvious reasons. Among them were this little boy and his father, who the interviewer spoke to in the shadow of a makeshift memorial honoring the 129 people that have died and more than 350 injured.

What happened in this interview is proof that love will always conquer hate. I don’t expect that many of our readers are fluent in French, so the little kid’s touching remarks are transcribed below the video in English, courtesy of the Huffington Post. The interview opens with the reporter questioning the young bro if he understands why terrorists attacked Paris.

“Yes, because they’re very very very mean,” the boy replies. “The bad guys aren’t very nice. And we really have to be careful because we have to change homes.”

His dad coaxes him, saying, “No, don’t worry, we don’t have to change homes. France is our home.”

“But there are bad guys, Daddy!” the boy says.

“Yes, but there are bad guys everywhere,” his father counters.

“They have guns, they can shoot at us because they have guns and are bad,” the boy continues.

“Well, they have guns, but we have flowers,” the father says.

“But flowers don’t do anything,” the boy argues.

“See all the flowers?” his dad asks. “They’re to fight against the guns.”

“Are they there to protect?” the boy asks. “The candles too?”

“There you go,” his dad says. “It’s to not forget those who left us yesterday.”

“The flowers and the candles,” the boy concludes, “they’re there to protect us.”

The reporter jumps back in and asks the boy, “So are you feeling better?”

“Yep,” he says. I’m feeling better.”

CLICK HERE FOR VIDEO SHARED IN FAEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/PetitJournalYannBarthes/videos/1013093998733798/


PHILSTAR

Paris victims remembered in Manila By Pialee-Brago (The Philippine Star) | Updated November 18, 2015 - 12:00am 0 0 googleplus0 0


A Frenchwoman lights candles in front of an Eiffel Tower replica outside the Alliance Francais during a memorial for the victims of the Paris attacks in Makati City the other night. AP

MANILA, Philippines - Victims of the terror attacks in Paris were remembered in a commemoration ceremony organized by the French embassy in Manila on Monday.

French Ambassador Thierry Mathou said the deadly attacks in France were committed by terrorists who attacked the office of French magazine Charlie Hebdo in January, which was an attack against a symbol of freedom of expression.

“Unlike what happened in January, when terrorists attacked a symbol of freedom of expression, today it is our right to life, our very right to exist peacefully, that was targeted,” Mathou said during the vigil at the Alliance Francaise de Manille in Makati City.

“As you are well aware of, those heinous crimes have sadly claimed many lives and injured even more innocent people,” he added.

Mathou stressed that to be able to co-exist is the very basis of humanity as opposed to barbarity, and that “France will always fight against extremism and defend the values of democracy and human rights.”

“These terrorist acts are not only attacks against France, but against civilization itself. The values of civilization are enshrined in France’s national motto ‘Liberte, Egalite, Fraternite.’ But they are also universal values. It is our common responsibility to defend them,” he said.


ZEROHEDGE.COM

"War In Paris" - ISIS Claims Responsibility For Deadly Attacks Killing 127: The Full Summary by Tyler Durden on 11/14/2015 07:19 -0500


By Tyler Durden's picture Submitted

The morning after a truly tragic Friday the 13th, France wakes up to the following front pages, among which one which best captures the atmosphere in Paris at this moment: "war in Paris":

Here is the latest summary of the aftermath from last night's six distinct attacks across Paris, compiled from numerous media outlets:

●At least 127 people are feared to have been killed according to French president Hollande in a series of devastating attacks across Paris.

●Among the dead are at least two Belgians, two Romanians and a Swedish citizen, with UK prime minister David Cameron warning British casualties are likely.

●Eight attackers also died, police say, seven of them by detonating explosive suicide belts.

●Police continue to search for accomplices who might still be at large.

●Two hundred people were injured, 80 of them seriously.

●Shootings and explosions were reported in six locations across the city, including the Stade de France in northern Paris, where two suicide attacks and a bombing took place as the national team played Germany in a friendly football match.

●The majority of victims died after a mass shooting inside the Bataclan concert venue. Shootings also took place in restaurants and other sites in the centre of the city.

●President François Hollande, who was at the Stade de France at the time of the assaults, said: "We are going to lead a war which will be pitiless. Because when terrorists are capable of committing such atrocities they must be certain that they are facing a determined France, a united France, a France that is together and does not let itself be moved, even if today we express infinite sorrow."

●A state of emergency has been declared across France and security at the country’s borders has been tightened. Paris residents have been told to stay in their homes and authorities say “all of the city’s amenities”, including schools, universities, museums, libraries, gyms, swimming pools and markets, will close on Saturday.

●US president Barack Obama described the atrocities as “an attack on all of humanity”. Australian prime minister Malcolm Turnbull said the attack “appears to have all the hallmarks of a Daesh [Islamic State] exercise”.

CONTINUE READING...

●Iran’s president, Hassan Rouhani, has cancelled his official visit to France, due to take place next week, in the wake of the terrorist attacks.

●UN chief Ban Ki-moon on Friday condemned "the despicable terrorist attacks carried out in various locations in and around Paris" and demanded "the immediate release of the numerous individuals reportedly being held hostage in the Bataclan theater";

●The Belgian prime minister, Charles Michel, has urged his citizens to avoid going to Paris unless “strictly necessary”. He added that security will be stepped up at public events in Belgium.

●Paris Deputy Mayor said it is a "terrible, terrible situation ... a tragedy we are facing."

●Syrian president al-Assad also condemned the attack: "What France suffered from savage terror is what the Syrian people have been enduring for over five years."

●Police have raided a Brussels neighbourhood where three of the attackers are believed to have lived, and made a number of arrests. One of the attackers at the Bataclan is understood to be a 30-year-old French national, who was known to French police because of links to Islamic radicals.

●A Syrian and an Egyptian passport were found on the bodies of the two suicide bombers who targeted the Stade de France.

●The Syrian passport belonged to a refugee who passed through Greece, according to a Greek minister.

●German authorities say they have ‘reasonable grounds to believe’ a man arrested in Bavaria earlier this month, in a car loaded with explosives, may be linked to the Paris attacks. Where the attacks took place: 

The attacks were launched in six separate locations across the city – five in the 10th and 11th arrondissements, and one close to the Stade de France, in the north of the city, where president François Hollande was attending a football match between the French and German teams. The map below highlights the most prominent ones:

* * *

How the attacks unfolded:

Stade de France - Bombings

Blasts were heard near the stadium in the north of Paris around 9.30pm local time on Friday. Police later confirmed there were three simultaneous bombings, including two suicide attacks, near the stadium as France played Germany in a friendly match.

French President Francois Hollande, who was at the game, left immediately. A prosecutor said people there had been fatalities, but did not confirm the number. A police union official said three people had died.

The blasts occurred near two of the stadium entrances and at a nearby McDonald's restaurant.

Restaurant And Bar - Shooting

Around 10:30pm, there were reports of a shooting at a restaurant on Rue Alibert in the 10th arrondissement, about five miles away from the Stade de France.

At least 14 people were later confirmed dead in the rampage at Le Carillon, a bar-cafe, and the nearby Cambodian restaurant Le Petit Cambodge.

Witnesses said gunmen armed with Kalashnikov assault rifles fired at victims through the plate-glass windows.

Bataclan Concert Hall - Bombings And Shooting

By 11pm reports emerged that the popular music venue on Boulevard Voltaire in the nearby 11th arrondissement was under attack.

Early reports suggested 15 people had been shot dead in the concert hall, where American band Eagles of Death Metal was due to play. Dozens of hostages were taken inside the venue.

A short time later, security forces launched an assault on the theatre. The two attackers were killed after detonating explosive belts. It now appears more than 80 concert-goers were killed in the venue. Initial reports suggested 120 people were killed.

According to Guardian, the attackers first sprayed cafes outside the concert hall with machine gunfire, then went inside and opened fire on the panicked audience, according to the Paris police chief. As police closed in, three of them detonated suicide vests, killing themselves and setting off explosions.

Several people inside the venue survived the massacre. The band was also confirmed as safe.

One person was also killed on Boulevard Voltaire, not far from the venue

Cafe - Shooting

Less than a mile from the concert hall, at least 18 diners sitting on outdoor terraces at La Belle Equipe in the popular Charonne area were shot dead. Emergency workers covered bodies on the pavement outside the traditional Parisian cafe.

Le Carillon, a bar-cafe, and the nearby Cambodian restaurant Le Petit Cambodge were apparently both targeted with gunfire, killing around 14 people and leaving several gravely injured, according to the prosecutor. They are at the junction of Rue Bichat and Rue Alibert.

Witnesses described sounds like fireworks, before they realised the gravity of the situation and tried to find a place to hide, or flee.

Pizzeria - Shooting

Five people were killed in La Casa Nostra pizzeria on Rue de la Fontaine au Roi in the 11th arrondissement.

Witnesses reported seeing a man firing a machine gun.

* * *

The latest death toll

Latest information says that at least 120 people are believed to have been killed in six separate attacks across the city. Two hundred people are injured, 80 seriously.

At the Bataclan concert venue, 87 people have been reported dead. At the Stade de France, the Paris prosecutor François Molins said “some” were killed, possibly three. (It is not clear whether this include the attackers thought to have died here.) At the shootings at the Rue de Charonne, 18 are dead. At Boulevard Voltaire, one person is dead. At Rue de la Fontaine au Roi, five are dead. At Rue Alibert, 14 are dead and “many seriously injured”. Police say they continue to hunt for any possible accomplices to the attacks. No one has yet claimed responsibility.

* * *

Attackers Killed

Eight extremists involved in the attacks have been killed, the prosecutor said. Seven died in suicide bombings, while the other was killed in the concert hall. Some witnesses in the hall said they heard the gunmen shout Islamic chants and slogans condemning France's role in Syria.

* * *

Attackers still not identified

We sill do not know the identities or nationalities of the attackers involved in the Friday night attacks, though authorities say eight died, seven of them detonating suicide bombs and the final perpetrator shot by police.

Prosecutor’s office spokeswoman Agnes Thibault-Lecuivre has told AP police have not ruled out the possibility that accomplices may still be at large and that is the focus of the investigation now.

Britain is hold its own emergency meeting of the COBRA intelligence committee, called by prime minster David Cameron.

* * *

Hollande Blames Attack on Islamic State

The French president has made an impassioned statement after the emergency security meeting this morning, where he blamed the attack on Islamic State.

Hollande said 127 people were killed in the attacks, which he described as an “act of war”. He said the attacks were co-ordinated, planned and organised from abroad with assistance from inside France.

“I pay homage to the country’s defenders who fought the terrorists yesterday,” he said. “Everyone has given their utmost and will be putting in their best efforts in the day to come.”

He called the attack “cowardly’ and said every measure would be taken to fight “the terrorist menace.”

"In this most serious and uncertain time, I call for unity and courage,” he said, adding that he would address the French parliament on Monday.

“Even if France is wounded, she will rise,” he said. The country will observe three days of mourning.

Hollande's full remarks from his address to the nation earlier from the Élysée Palace.

What happened yesterday in Paris and in Saint Denis is an act of war and this country needs to make the right decisions to fight this war. This act committed by the terrorist army, Islamic State, is against who we are, against a free country that speaks to the whole world.

It is an act of war prepared and planned outside, with outside involvement which this investigation will seek to establish. It is an act of absolute barbarism. France will be ruthless in its response to Islamic State.

At this painful and serious time, which is such a decisive one for our country, I call for unity, for a collective spirit and for cool heads. I will address Parliament at Versailles on Monday.

France is strong, and even if she is wounded, she will rise once again. Even if we are in grief, nothing will destroy her.

France is strong, valiant and will defeat this barbarism. History reminds us of this and the strength we today bear to come together convinces us of this.

My compatriots, what we defend is our homeland and much more than that, it is our own values of humanity and France will bear its responsibilities.

* * *

Islamic State takes responsibility for Paris attacks

Shortly after Hollande's announcement blaming the Islamic State,in an official statement by ISIS, the group said France is the “top target” of the group.

It says it carefully studied the locations for the attacks, which were carried out by fighters wearing suicide belts and carrying machine guns.

Here’s the statement in French

In the statement Islamic State said “soldiers of Caliphate has targeted the capital of abomination and perversion.”

Eight brothers carrying explosive belts and guns targeted areas in the heart of the French capital that were specifically chosen in advance: the Stade de France during a match against Germany which that imbecile Francois Hollande was attending; the Bataclan where hundreds of idolaters were together in a party of perversity as well as other targets in the 10th, 11th and 18th arrondissement

France and those who follow its path must know that they remain the principle targets of the Islamic State.

The statement from Islamic State goes on to call the attacks a response to insults directed at the Prophet Mohammed, as well as airstrikes by France on Islamic State-held territory.

The militant group says France is the Islamic State’s key target:

...having dared insult our Prophet, having bragged about fighting Islam in France and striking Muslims in the Caliphate with their planes which have not helped them in any way in the ill-smelling streets of Paris.

This attack is just the start of a storm and a warning for those who wish to draw lessons.

* * *

Global Consequences of Attacks

According to FT, the immediate policy and political questions concern French involvement in the Middle East - as well as the impact of the attack on next month’s regional elections.

The terrorists are reported to have shouted comments about the war in Syria. France launched its first airstrikes on ISIS in Syria in September and has been involved in bombing raids on ISIS in Iraq for many months.

It is highly unlikely that President Francois Hollande will respond to the terror attacks by calling off French involvement in the war on ISIS. Indeed, in the short term, an intensification of military involvement is more likely.

The reaction of French voters will be watched closely. Next month, they go to the polls in regional elections. There were already opinion surveys that suggested that Marine Le Pen, leader of the far-right National Front, will win in the Nord-Pas de Calais region - while her niece, Marion Marechal-Le Pen has also topped some polls in the Provence region in the South.

The National Front - which has a long history of hostility to Muslim immigration and which has also argued for the restoration of frontier controls - may well benefit in the aftermath of the attacks. Some of its arguments were, in any case, already seeping into the discourse of the traditional centre-right parties.

The terror attacks in Paris also come at a time when Europe is in the midst of a “migrant crisis”. With Germany set to receive over 1m refugees this year - most of them from the war-torn Middle East - the domestic pressure on Angela Merkel, the German chancellor, to close her country’s borders to new migrants was already mounting. Even before the Paris attacks Sweden - which has taken more migrants per head than any other EU country - had announced a closure of its borders to new refugees, albeit as a temporary measure. In the aftermath of Paris, the German chancellor, will surely be tempted to take a similar measure, so easing the political and social pressure on her government. But Mrs Merkel will also be aware of the dangerous knock-on effects, such an action could have on Balkan countries further down the migrant route.

One possible consequence would be for Western policy to focus even more tightly on the defeat of the jihadists of Islamic State - while playing down subsidiary goals, such as the removal of President Bashar al-Assad of Syria. But France has been in the forefront of those countries arguing that Assad is at the centre of the problem of Syria. A complete reversal of the anti-Assad policy seems unlikely in the coming weeks. What is more likely is that policy will evolve in the coming months, as the impact, lessons and sheer shock of the Paris terror attacks is absorbed.

* * *

Le Monde journalist Daniel Psenny, whose apartment overlooks the emergency exit of the Bataclan has posted an extraordinary video, of people clambering out of windows to escape from the theatre – a scene he said reminded him of 9/11.

The video is graphic and includes images of what appear to be dead bodies.

Psenny himself was shot in the arm as he attempted to help people shelter in his apartment, and is being treated at the Georges-Pompidou hospital.

Here’s a translation of his piece from Le Monde.

I was trying to do some work at home. The TV was on, playing a cop film starring Jean-Hugues Anglade. I heard a noise which sounded like firecrackers and initially I was convinced that it was in the film. But the noise was so loud, I went to the window. I live on the second floor and my apartment overlooks the emergency exit of the Bataclan.

Sometimes there are evacuations [in the past], but everyone was running out from all directions. I saw people on the floor, and blood... I understood then that it was something serious. I asked passersby what was happening. Everyone was running toward the Rue Amelot or the boulevard Voltaire.

A woman was clinging to the window of the Bataclan, on the second floor. I thought of those images from September 11.

So, I told myself I was going to open up to people, so they could come and take refuge. Therefore, I opened the door to my apartment. There was a man lying on the pavement and an another man whom I did not see again, he was shot as he was trying to take shelter in the lobby.

That’s the moment I took a bullet. I don’t remember much after that, I have a blank, but I remember feeling like a firecracker had exploded in my left arm and I saw that it was pissing blood. I think the shooter was at the window of the Bataclan. I went up to some neighbours on the fourth floor.

The guy we did get in [to the apartment] was shot in the leg. He was an American. He vomited, he was cold and we thought he was going to die. We called the emergency services but they couldn’t get us out. I called a friend who is a doctor and she explained how to make a tourniquet with my shirt. We were stuck in the apartment until the police raid occurred and they came to find us.

* * *

Below are some of the most dramatic scene from yesterday's tragedy captured by Bloomberg:


Forensic police search for evidences inside the Comptoir Voltaire cafe at the site of an attack in Paris on Saturday, Nov. 14.


Forensic police search for evidences inside the La Belle Equipe cafe on rue de Charonne at the site of an attack in Paris on Saturday, Nov. 14.


Forensic police search for evidences inside the La Belle Equipe cafe on rue de Charonne at the site of an attack in Paris on Saturday, Nov. 14.


French President Francois Hollande, center, flanked by French Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve, left, and French Prime Minister manuel Valls addresses reporters near the Bataclan concert hall in central Paris in the early morning of Saturday, Nov. 14.


Police forces, firefighters and rescue workers secure the area near the Bataclan concert hall in central Paris in the early morning of Saturday, Nov. 14.


Investigating police officers work outside the Stade de France stadium, in Saint Denis, outside Paris, Friday Nov. 13.


French security moves people in the area of Rue Bichat of the 10th arrondissement in Paris on Friday, Nov. 13.


Victims lay on the pavement outside a restaurant in Paris on Friday, Nov. 13.


Spectators gather on the pitch of the Stade de France stadium following the friendly football match between France and Germany in Saint-Denis, north of Paris, on Friday, Nov. 13


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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