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IT'S A NEW CANADA! CANADIAN ELECTION 2015 HANDS JUSTIN TRUDEAU AND THE LIBERALS A MAJORITY GOVT
[This is the first political dynasty in Canada. The new PM will go back to the first home he ever knew, his childhood residence when his father, Pierre Elliot Trudeau was PM of Canada. Defeated Conservative PM Harper, the one with a lot to lose. The new PM Trudeau, the one with a lot to prove]


OCTOBER 20 -Canadian Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau on stage in Montreal on October after the Liberal victory.NICHOLAS KAMM / AFP / Getty Images The Liberal Party steamrolled to a stunning political comeback Monday night, forming a new, majority government and creating Canada’s first family dynasty at the highest level of national politics as an historic campaign came to a dramatic end. The Liberals had collapsed to just 34 seats and third place in the 2011 election. But they were elected in 184 constituencies by early morning, taking from both the NDP and Conservatives and riding a wave of resentment toward Harper. The damage done: Major defeats on Monday night ●Tory Finance Minister Joe Oliver loses his seat to Liberal Marco Mendicino in Eglinton-Lawrence. ●Tory Immigration Minister Chris Alexander loses to Liberal Mark Holland in Ajax. ●New Democrat Olivia Chow concedes victory to Liberal Adam Vaughan in Spadina-Fort York. ●Julian Fantino, the divisive former Veterans Affairs minister, loses to Liberal Francesco Sorbara in Vaughan-Woodbridge. ●Gail Shea — the Tory minister of fisheries and oceans loses to Liberal Bobby Morrissey in Egmont (P.E.I.) ●Bloc Québécois leader Gilles Duceppe loses seat in Laurier—Sainte-Marie despite managing to at resuscitating the nationalist party. ●NDP foreign affairs critic Paul Dewar loses to Catherine Mary McKenna in Ottawa Centre. ●Megan Leslie — deputy leader of the NDP — loses to Liberal Andy Fillmore in Halifax ●Bernard Valcourt — the Tories’ minister of aboriginal affairs and northern development, is loses in Madawaska-Restigouche to Liberal Rene Arseneault ●Conservative Peter Penashue — the former federal cabinet minister who resigned over fundraising problems in last federal election — loses to Liberal Yvonne Jones in Labrador. ●Liberal Ken McDonald elected in Avalon, defeating Independent Scott Andrews, the former Liberal MP who left caucus after allegations of sexual harassment. — Liberal leader Justin Trudeau's wife Sophie Gregoire looks on as her husband delivers a speech on Monday night. As the results began streaming in from the last polls in British Columbia, it became apparent that Liberal leader Justin Trudeau, whose father Pierre was one of Canada’s most legendary leaders, had exceeded the 170-seat threshold for a majority government that even the most recent polls indicated would be impossible. The Conservatives ended the evening with 99 seats and 31.9% of the popular vote, the NDP with 44 seats (19.7%), the Bloc Québécois with 10 seats (4.7%) and the Greens with one seat, leader Elizabeth May’s in B.C., and 3.5% support. The Tories’ backing remained virtually the same as it has been in polls for weeks now, with the huge Liberal gains coming largely at the expense of the New Democrats. After three terms as prime minister, Stephen Harper indicated to his party that he would be stepping down as leader of the Conservatives, though remaining as an MP. READ MORE...

TWEETS: #ThankYouStephenHarper, and Hello #PMJT Voters thanked Harper both sincerely and sarcastically, while welcoming Justin Trudeau


OCTOBER 20 -Justin Trudeau pledges 'real change' as Liberals leap ahead to majority government Canada election 2015: Liberals raid Conservative seats while NDP holds ground in B.C. It's a tale of two hashtags: one ushering Stephen Harper out with both sincerity and snark, the other an enthusiastic hello to #PMJT, more properly known as prime minister-designate Justin Trudeau. #ThankYouStephenHarper  The first tweets thanking Stephen Harper for his leadership and service to Canada were sincere, to be sure. But Conservative attempts to get #ThankYouStephenHarper trending were quickly co-opted by others eager to say goodbye. Hello #PMJT Meanwhile, PMJT had been used as Twitter shorthand for a possible Trudeau victory for months — especially by one Conservative supporter. But as the polls started tilting Liberal in early October, so did the hashtag. When election results rolled in Monday night, #PMJT wasn't just an abbreviation, but a rallying cry. #PMJT #PMJT's positive message — repeated throughout the campaign, and again in his victory speech — seems to have resonated with voters. (CBC/Reuters) FULL REPORT.

ALSO: The world welcomes Canada’s ‘super hot new leader’


Liberal Leader and Prime Minister-designate Justin Trudeau shakes hands as he leaves following his victory speech in Montreal on Oct. 19, 2015. (Justin Tang/Canadian Press)
READ MORE...

ALSO: How it all ended for Stephen Harper


OCTOBER 20 -Prime Minister-designate Justin Trudeau addresses supporters at a welcome rally the day after winning the federal election, in Ottawa on Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2015.
'We're back,' Trudeau tells allies abroad Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau waves while accompanied by his wife Sophie Gregoire as he gives his victory speech after Canada's federal election in Montreal, Quebec, October 19, 2015. As the Conservatives loses big, the convention hall was like people filed into a funeral parlour for someone beloved whose political power just died; they shuffle their feet, solemnly say little, force smiles easily mistaken for grimaces as they shake hands with fellow travelers they haven’t seen in too long. A few sighs of “Oh, I’ve been better,” met with sympathetic nods. Later, plenty of hugs when the relatives take their seats. This was how Conservatives carried themselves Monday in defeat. Stephen Harper’s supporters had just begun to enter the convention centre hall after Alberta polls closed as the video screens declared a Trudeau government. A silence choked the air. ALBERTAN “I hate to hear this. I really hate to hear this,” Ric McIver said to nobody in particular, as CTV’s decision desk announced an early verdict that would stick. McIver is the interim leader for what remains of Alberta’s provincial Tories. It was a scene he and many right-leaning Albertans could easily would recognize from May’s provincial election—a dread that loss was coming, the other guy’s colour spreading onto parts of the map they would have never expected a few weeks or even days before opponents began their stampede in one dominant direction. Fatally for the Harper Conservatives, national voters stormed away from orange and into the deep red. THE FORDS There were many questionable choices in the Conservative campaign’s endgame, from the game-show cash register stunts to letting Rob and Doug Ford within 500 feet of a politician hoping to position himself as a credible choice. The final one had to be the first song played over the hall’s loudspeaker: Enter Sandman by Metallica. “Exit light, enter night. Take my hand, off to never-neverland.” But aside from that apparent backhand at the return of Trudeau rule, the departing Prime Minister struck proud notes in his own political eulogy. A voiceover announcer introduced him. Harper walked into the hall with his wife, but down the long, narrow stage to the lectern on his own. “We put it all on the line, we gave everything we have to give,” Harper said. “And we have no regrets, whatsoever. Friends, how could we? We remain citizens of the best country.” He lauded his tax measures, his late-term budget balance, his trade agreements, his bid to give a nation that had fancied itself as peacekeepers some military gruffness. “Know also this: The disappointment you also feel is my responsibility, and mine alone,” he told the crowd. Whether or not speechwriters gave him subsequent lines in his speech about his resignation as Conservative leader, he did not deliver any. In a nod to the tradition he has built, Harper did not speak to reporters. Aides suggested he might not. He left it to a surrogate, the party president, to issue a statement announcing his news, and another surrogate to explain Harper’s own likely enduring silence on this matter. He chose to say something else, came a spokesman’s explanation to perplexed reporters. Conservatives quickly headed for the exits, some likely unaware their party was now headless. As one Twitter user noted, Harper and fellow Calgarians will wake up Tuesday morning with Naheed Nenshi as their mayor, Rachel Notley as their premier and Justin Trudeau as their prime minister-designate. READ MORE...

ALSO In September: Candidates woo Fil-Canadians for Oct. 19 federal elections


OCTOBER 18 -Fil-Am Prof. Tony San Juan explaining the formation of a political action council, on candidates’ night at the Philippine Press Club of Ontario. PHOTOS BY MARISA ROQUE TORONTO, Ontario
— Candidates from three of Canada’s major political parties faced Filipino Canadians at a political forum hosted by the Philippine Press Club of Ontario, in anticipation of the coming October 19 federal elections. Leaders from volunteer community organizations, members of nonprofit associations and the Filipino Canadian media community, and election campaign workers on September 8 gathered for a working dinner at Casa Manila on York Mills Road. READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

Canadian election 2015 hands Justin Trudeau and the Liberals a majority government


Canadian Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau on stage in Montreal on October after the Liberal victory.NICHOLAS KAMM / AFP / Getty Images

MANILA, OCTOBER 26, 2015 (NATIONAL POST, CANADA)  Tom Blackwell | October 20, 2015  - The Liberal Party steamrolled to a stunning political comeback Monday night, forming a new, majority government and creating Canada’s first family dynasty at the highest level of national politics as an historic campaign came to a dramatic end.

The Liberals had collapsed to just 34 seats and third place in the 2011 election. But they were elected in 184 constituencies by early morning, taking from both the NDP and Conservatives and riding a wave of resentment toward Harper.

The damage done: Major defeats on Monday night

 ●Tory Finance Minister Joe Oliver loses his seat to Liberal Marco Mendicino in Eglinton-Lawrence.
 ●Tory Immigration Minister Chris Alexander loses to Liberal Mark Holland in Ajax.
 ●New Democrat Olivia Chow concedes victory to Liberal Adam Vaughan in Spadina-Fort York.
 ●Julian Fantino, the divisive former Veterans Affairs minister, loses to Liberal Francesco Sorbara in Vaughan-Woodbridge.
 ●Gail Shea — the Tory minister of fisheries and oceans loses to Liberal Bobby Morrissey in Egmont (P.E.I.)
 ●Bloc Québécois leader Gilles Duceppe loses seat in Laurier—Sainte-Marie despite managing to at resuscitating the nationalist party.
 ●NDP foreign affairs critic Paul Dewar loses to Catherine Mary McKenna in Ottawa Centre.
 ●Megan Leslie — deputy leader of the NDP — loses to Liberal Andy Fillmore in Halifax Bernard Valcourt — the Tories’ minister of aboriginal affairs and northern development, is loses in Madawaska-Restigouche to Liberal Rene Arseneault Conservative Peter Penashue — the former federal cabinet minister who resigned over fundraising problems in last federal election — loses to Liberal Yvonne Jones in Labrador. Liberal Ken McDonald elected in Avalon, defeating Independent Scott Andrews, the former Liberal MP who left caucus after allegations of sexual harassment. — Liberal leader Justin Trudeau's wife Sophie Gregoire looks on as her husband delivers a speech on Monday night. As the results began streaming in from the last polls in British Columbia, it became apparent that Liberal leader Justin Trudeau, whose father Pierre was one of Canada’s most legendary leaders, had exceeded the 170-seat threshold for a majority government that even the most recent polls indicated would be impossible.


THE NEW LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION, MR. HARPER: "We have championed those values all of our public lives. ... we gave everything we have to give, and we no regrets whatsoever. ... While tonight's result is certainly not the one we had hoped for, the people are never wrong."

The Conservatives ended the evening with 99 seats and 31.9% of the popular vote, the NDP with 44 seats (19.7%), the Bloc Québécois with 10 seats (4.7%) and the Greens with one seat, leader Elizabeth May’s in B.C., and 3.5% support.

The Tories’ backing remained virtually the same as it has been in polls for weeks now, with the huge Liberal gains coming largely at the expense of the New Democrats.

After three terms as prime minister, Stephen Harper indicated to his party that he would be stepping down as leader of the Conservatives, though remaining as an MP.

READ MORE...

A Tory supporter in Calgary looks on with disgust at televised speech by Justin Trudeau on Monday night. In a lengthy victory speech, Trudeau stressed the power of positive election campaigning and its potential to change how Canadians view public service.

“You can appeal to the better angels of our natures, and you can win while doing it,” he said. “We beat fear with hope, we beat cynicism with hard work, we beat negative, divisive politics with a positive vision that brings Canadians together.”

He also alluded to the Conservatives’ campaign against what they called “barbaric cultural practices” such as women who wear the face-covering niqab at citizenship ceremonies.

“Our enviable, inclusive society didn’t happen by accident and won’t continue without effort,” said Trudeau. “Have faith in your fellow citizens, they are kind and generous, they are open and optimistic. They know in their heart of hearts that a Canadian is a Canadian is a Canadian.”

Harper said in a muted concession speech that would help facilitate the transition of power, before touting what he said were some of the guiding principles of his political career.

“We believe hardworking Canadians should keep more of the money they earn because we believe the government should manage people’s money the way people manage their own,” he said. “We believe that in a dangerous world, Canadians must advance our values defend our interests and stand by our friends.”

The campaign underscored the differences between the parties, which helped Canadians make a choice, Tom Mulcair, the NDP leader, said in his concession speech late Monday night.

“Today Canadians have made that choice, and we accept that choice with full humility,” he said, before leaving the stage quickly.


NDP leader Tom Mulcair waves to the crowd with his wife, Catherine Pinhas, and his son Matt beside him after delivering a speech to party supporters in Montreal on Monday.
Allen McInnis / THE GAZETTE Allen McInnis / THE GAZETTE

Mulcair added that Trudeau had made “ambitious commitments” to Canadians, and voters will now have high expectations.

The night was a major disappointment for the NDP, who had been ahead in the polls only weeks ago and looked on the verge of leading the federal government for the first time. It dropped from 94 seats in the last Parliament.

The Liberals started by snapping up all 32 seats in Atlantic Canada, then stormed into Ontario, Quebec and the Prairies as the first two waves of results flooded in Monday.

A subdued Peter McKay, who resigned as a Conservative MP and cabinet minister earlier this year, conceded early in the evening that many voters wanted to turf out his party.

“This is not what we had hoped for at all,” McKay told CBC. “Clearly there was a very clear resonance of this (idea of) change – change to what or change for what reason people can give all kinds of commentary.“

Canadian Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau on stage in Montreal on October after the Liberal victory. Jason Kenney, the Conservative national defence minister, suggested mid-evening that the Liberal gains early in the night were the inevitable result of a party being in power for a decade.

“After 10 years in office, there’s obviously going to be an accumulation of resentments over various issues,” he told CTV. “And that’s obviously what we’re seeing in Atlantic Canada.”


THE NEW PRIME MINISTER's WIFE: Liberal leader Justin Trudeau's wife Sophie Gregoire looks on as her husband delivers a speech on Monday night. Allen McInnis / THE GAZETTE Allen McInnis / THE GAZETTE

A plebiscite on Harper himself was woven throughout the campaign. Opponents depicted him as anti-democratic, overly hawkish and pandering to intolerant viewpoints; supporters, as a skillful, stable navigator of the ship of state.

The parties also offered some distinctive platform choices: Trudeau pledged to run three straight deficits so he could invest in a huge infrastructure program, the NDP promised to introduce a new national daycare program while still balancing the budget, the Conservatives touted a fiscally responsible program with various tax breaks.

The 78-day election set precedents on numerous counts: the longest race since 1872, the first mandated by a fixed-election-date law, and the launch pad for controversial new voter-ID rules.

But the real surprises emerged as the campaign itself unfolded.

The Conservatives began a close second behind a buoyant New Democratic Party in most polls, though pundits predicted the elongated campaign could play into the hands of the Tories and their overflowing war chest.

The Liberals were in third, Trudeau apparently having peaked months earlier and succumbed to the perception that he was too green and intellectually light-weight to be prime minister.


Justin Trudeau kisses his wife Sophie as they arrive on stage in Montreal on Oct. 20, 2015. (NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)

We’re not going to have Stephen Harper to kick around anymore. The Conservative leader has asked his party’s national council to reach out to the new parliamentary caucus to appoint an interim leader and implement a leadership contest.

Not that you would have known that from his valedictory address to the faithful in Calgary, where he neglected to mention he plans on leaving. Read more … Then began a deluge of disparate issues and stories – from immigration to the economy and free trade – that sent the campaign skittering off in a myriad directions.

Perhaps the earliest sign that those first expectations would have to be revised came with the first leaders’ debate, where no one scored an obvious win but Trudeau drew plaudits for a solid performance.

As the Senate-expenses trial of Mike Duffy played out, Conservative fortunes seemed to flatten and the Liberals began slowly picking up steam. By early September, a succession of polls showed the three parties in a statistical dead heat, none ahead by more than the margin of error.


(LEFT) THE NEW PM's MOM, MARGARET TRUDEAU: Margaret Trudeau on Justin's win: 'A golden moment in my life' Prime minister-designate Justin Trudeau is accompanied by his mother Margaret Trudeau (L) and his wife Sophie Gregoire, daughter Ella Grace and sons Hadrien (foreground) and Xavier (R) as he watches results at his election night headquarters in Montreal, Que., Oct. 19, 2015. (Chris Wattie/Reuters)

Then came the first real disruptive event of the campaign, the Quebec-centred debate on the Conservatives’ determination to prevent women from wearing face-covering niqabs at citizenship swearing-in ceremonies.

Mulcair came out strongly against the policy, a position that went over poorly in Quebec, the province whose orange-wave of New Democrat victories in 2011 raised the party to a historic high in Parliament.

As the NDP’s support dropped in Quebec, the Liberals picked up support in the polls, apparently because voters determined to oust Harper and the Tories saw Trudeau’s team as the best bet to win.


JUSTIN'S YOUNG PARENTS OF YORE: Pierre Trudeau and Margaret Sinclair were married March 5, 1971 at St. Stephen's Church in North Vancouver.FRED SCHIFFER / VANCOUVER SUN

The Conservatives doubled down on the niqab file, announcing a hotline to collect reports of “barbaric cultural practices.” But it failed to pay dividends and, coupled with a tepid response to the Syrian refugee crisis, left an impression the Tories were anti-immigration. Polls suggested Conservative support had flat-lined, as the Liberals moved into the lead and steadily increased the gap.

Further muddying the waters was the announcement of an agreement in the Trans-Pacific Partnership talks, a trade deal among 12 countries that the Conservatives touted as potential Viagra for the economy, but the NDP said was a sell-out that would decimate Ontario’s automobile industry. Jake Edmiston, National Post and the Canadian Press Sean Kilpatrick / Canadian Press Sean Kilpatrick / Canadian Press


TWEETS: #ThankYouStephenHarper, and Hello #PMJT Voters thanked Harper both sincerely and sarcastically, while welcoming Justin Trudeau By Lisa Johnson, CBC News Posted: Oct 20, 2015 2:00 AM PT Last Updated: Oct 20, 2015 2:00 AM PT (Darryl Dyck and Paul Chiasson/Canadian Press)

Justin Trudeau pledges 'real change' as Liberals leap ahead to majority government Canada election 2015: Liberals raid Conservative seats while NDP holds ground in B.C. It's a tale of two hashtags: one ushering Stephen Harper out with both sincerity and snark, the other an enthusiastic hello to #PMJT, more properly known as prime minister-designate Justin Trudeau.

#ThankYouStephenHarper

The first tweets thanking Stephen Harper for his leadership and service to Canada were sincere, to be sure.

But Conservative attempts to get #ThankYouStephenHarper trending were quickly co-opted by others eager to say goodbye.

Hello #PMJT

Meanwhile, PMJT had been used as Twitter shorthand for a possible Trudeau victory for months — especially by one Conservative supporter. But as the polls started tilting Liberal in early October, so did the hashtag.

When election results rolled in Monday night, #PMJT wasn't just an abbreviation, but a rallying cry.

#PMJT #PMJT's positive message — repeated throughout the campaign, and again in his victory speech — seems to have resonated with voters. (CBC/Reuters)


MSN.COM/THE GLOBE AND MAIL CANADA

The world welcomes Canada’s ‘super hot new leader’ The Globe and Mail The Globe and Mail [Mark MacKinnon, Omar el-Akkad] 10 hrs ago SHARE OCTOBER 20, 2015


Liberal Leader and Prime Minister-designate Justin Trudeau shakes hands as he leaves following his victory speech in Montreal on Oct. 19, 2015. (Justin Tang/Canadian Press)

Names fly as Conservatives plan for leadership Conservative Leader Stephen Harper waves to the crowd as he leaves the stage on election night in Calgary on Monday Oct. 19, 2015.

Stephen Harper: The political outsider who sought a conservative revolution It’s not often that a Canadian election grabs top-of-page headlines around the world. But it’s not often that a Canadian prime minister makes the kind of international waves that Stephen Harper did.


OUTGOING PM AND FAMILY: Conservative Leader Stephen Harper, wife Laureen and son and daughter Ben and Rachel.

Making the election night plot even more interesting was the fact Mr. Harper’s main challenger was the son of the last (in many cases, only) Canadian prime minister many foreigners can remember the name of.

And so the fall of Stephen Harper and the rise of Justin Trudeau got more international attention than perhaps any Canadian election result before it. Britain’s The Guardian ran a Canadian election live blog throughout Monday night and early Tuesday morning.

The Qatar-based Al Jazeera network held a panel discussion Tuesday looking at how the election result might alter some of the controversial foreign policies of the past nine years.

And despite having generated relatively little attention among Americans over the last couple of months, Canada’s election was front-page news in many parts of the United States on Tuesday. Both The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal led their print editions with news of the Liberals’ election win. C-SPAN, the public service political cable network, dedicated hours of airtime on Monday night to the election, most of it a direct live feed of the CBC’s coverage.

On social media, American interest in the election quickly focused on the man who will become Canada’s next prime minister. As the results rolled in, hundreds of Twitter users began posting images from Mr. Trudeau’s political past – from his charity boxing match with Canadian Senator Patrick Brazeau, to his various grooming choices over the years. (The Australian news website news.com.au had the most direct first paragraph: “The votes are in and Canada has come out of its election with a super hot new leader.”)

More substantially, there was immediate worry on pro-Israeli and pro-Ukrainian websites that their causes had lost an outspoken champion in Mr. Harper, who spent much of his government’s international capital on those two causes dearest to his heart.

Correspondingly, the election result garnered cheers from varied other corners – such as the environmental movement, and Vladimir Putin’s Kremlin – that agree on very little besides their shared dislike of Mr. Harper’s policies and style of politics.

Kremlin-controlled media could hardly contain their glee at the fall of Mr. Harper, who had fashioned himself into one of the most outspoken critics of Mr. Putin’s actions in Ukraine over the past 18 months, famously telling the Russian leader at last year’s G-20 summit that “I guess I’ll shake your hand but I have only one thing to say to you: you need to get out of Ukraine.”

“Another lout [opposed to] Putin goes: the prime minister of Canada, Stephen Harper lost the election to the Liberals and must resign,” pro-Kremlin journalist Dmitry Smirnov posted on his Twitter account hours after the result was announced. A headline on the state-owned Sputnik news service used exclamation marks to declare “Trudeau wins! Crack-smoking ex-mayor fails to save Canada’s Conservatives,” referencing Mr. Harper’s pre-election rally with disgraced former Toronto mayor Rob Ford.


A MOST HISTORIC AND VERY LONG CAMPAIGN: FROM LEFT: NDP Leader Thomas Mulcair, Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau and Conservative Leader Stephen Harper at various events across Canada Friday, Sept. 4, 2015.

Meanwhile, sources as diverse as politico.eu and Scientific American hypothesized that Mr. Trudeau, once in office, might play a more constructive role than his predecessor during the final weeks of negotiations before a global climate change summit in Paris in December. Mr. Trudeau has promised a new climate change policy, after consultations with the provinces, within 90 days of the Paris meeting.

Former U.S. vice-president Al Gore posted on his Twitter feed that “I’m hopeful tonight’s election will put Canada back in a leadership position” on the climate change file.

At Canada House in London, staff at the High Commission found themselves hosting a standing room-only crowd of 165 people who gathered Tuesday morning – even as the final results were still being tabulated – to hear a snap analysis from historian Margaret MacMillan, among others.


Voters may change their impressions of the leaders by watching them in debates — but only one in five Canadians have seen any of the debates. MARK BLINCH / REUTERS

Questions from the Canada House audience ranged from whether the incoming Liberal government would pay more attention to international institutions like the Commonwealth, to how fast Mr. Trudeau might be able to change Canada’s position on the climate change file.

“Canada’s more important than ever… [and] the ramifications of this result will be greater, in terms of the Paris climate change meeting, in terms of the approach of a G-7 country to military action in Syria, than ever before,” said Rob Marris, an MP for Britain’s opposition Labour Party who attended the Canada House breakfast, and said he was personally cheered to see an “anti-austerity party” win power in Canada.

The climate change Paris meeting will be just one in a rapid-fire series of big international gatherings that will give Mr. Trudeau an early chance to introduce himself and his government to the world.

First up will be a mid-November summit of the G-20 in Turkey, where the new Canadian prime minister will get a chance to introduce himself to Mr. Putin in his own fashion. Mr. Trudeau has also promised to end Canada’s participation in the combat mission against Islamic State, vowing to shift the government’s focus instead to the refugee crisis in the region.

The G-20 meeting will be followed by a summit of leaders from the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation group, where many will be anxious to hear whether Mr. Trudeau intends to ratify the Trans-Pacific Partnership free-trade agreement negotiated by the Harper government. Late November will also see a Commonwealth heads-of-government summit in Malta.


MSN.COM

How it all ended for Stephen Harper Maclean's Maclean's Jason Markusoff 16 hrs ago SHARE October 20, 2015


STEPHEN HARPER, MP

Prime Minister-designate Justin Trudeau addresses supporters at a welcome rally the day after winning the federal election, in Ottawa on Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2015.

'We're back,' Trudeau tells allies abroad Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau waves while accompanied by his wife Sophie Gregoire as he gives his victory speech after Canada's federal election in Montreal, Quebec, October 19, 2015.


CTV News: Trudeau embracing new role as PM CTV News: Trudeau embracing new role as PM With record voter turnout the Liberals saw a red wave that swept them back into power with a solid majority government. Extended: Justin Trudeau takes questions Prime Minister-designate Justin Trudeau takes questions in Ottawa's National Press Theatre. Power Play: Meeting with reporters 'a sea change' The Press Gallery panel says Justin Trudeau meeting with reporters to take questions is a 'sea change' over the last nine years.Marlene Leung and Sonja Puzic, CTVNews.ca Published Tuesday, October 20, 2015 9:28AM EDT

When people file into a funeral parlour for someone beloved, they shuffle their feet, solemnly say little, force smiles easily mistaken for grimaces as they shake hands with fellow travellers they haven’t seen in too long. A few sighs of “Oh, I’ve been better,” met with sympathetic nods. Later, plenty of hugs when the relatives take their seats. This was how Conservatives carried themselves Monday in defeat.

Stephen Harper’s supporters had just begun to enter the convention centre hall after Alberta polls closed as the video screens declared a Trudeau government. A silence choked the air.

ALBERTAN

“I hate to hear this. I really hate to hear this,” Ric McIver said to nobody in particular, as CTV’s decision desk announced an early verdict that would stick. McIver is the interim leader for what remains of Alberta’s provincial Tories.

It was a scene he and many right-leaning Albertans could easily would recognize from May’s provincial election—a dread that loss was coming, the other guy’s colour spreading onto parts of the map they would have never expected a few weeks or even days before opponents began their stampede in one dominant direction. Fatally for the Harper Conservatives, national voters stormed away from orange and into the deep red.

THE FORDS

There were many questionable choices in the Conservative campaign’s endgame, from the game-show cash register stunts to letting Rob and Doug Ford within 500 feet of a politician hoping to position himself as a credible choice.

The final one had to be the first song played over the hall’s loudspeaker: Enter Sandman by Metallica. “Exit light, enter night. Take my hand, off to never-neverland.”


Stephen Harper hammers home message, poses with Fords at Toronto rally - Politics - CBC News

But aside from that apparent backhand at the return of Trudeau rule, the departing Prime Minister struck proud notes in his own political eulogy. A voiceover announcer introduced him. Harper walked into the hall with his wife, but down the long, narrow stage to the lectern on his own.

“We put it all on the line, we gave everything we have to give,” Harper said. “And we have no regrets, whatsoever. Friends, how could we? We remain citizens of the best country.”

He lauded his tax measures, his late-term budget balance, his trade agreements, his bid to give a nation that had fancied itself as peacekeepers some military gruffness.

“Know also this: The disappointment you also feel is my responsibility, and mine alone,” he told the crowd.

Whether or not speechwriters gave him subsequent lines in his speech about his resignation as Conservative leader, he did not deliver any. In a nod to the tradition he has built, Harper did not speak to reporters. Aides suggested he might not. He left it to a surrogate, the party president, to issue a statement announcing his news, and another surrogate to explain Harper’s own likely enduring silence on this matter.

He chose to say something else, came a spokesman’s explanation to perplexed reporters. Conservatives quickly headed for the exits, some likely unaware their party was now headless.

As one Twitter user noted, Harper and fellow Calgarians will wake up Tuesday morning with Naheed Nenshi as their mayor, Rachel Notley as their premier and Justin Trudeau as their prime minister-designate.

READ MORE...


The Govenor General at Rideau Hall

Results rolled in at the same venue where Harper celebrated his three consecutive victories. But the space was much smaller than it was in 2011. The hall was cut in half by black curtains, TV screens, and Canadian flags that—for Stephen Harper—seemed relatively modest, a mere six arm spans wide. Instead of inflatable blue thundersticks, small flags sat on each chair, the patriotic red-and-white numbers they hand out by the sackful on Canada Day.

The signs came out after the results rolled in, when there was a now-former leader to cheer for. 

Canada’s Prime Minister Stephen Harper arrives at Rideau Hall to ask Governor General David Johnston to dissolve Parliament, beginning the longest federal…

The signs were there throughout the day that it would be bad, though perhaps not this bad. The party never notified journalists of where Harper would be voting, so only the Canadian Press pool crew could get the perennial photo op.

Conservatives wouldn’t give the reporter the voting location’s address, and drove him to the polling station, at a Royal Canadian Legion branch.

Conservatives will now get an interim party leader, a possibly fractious party race between Jason Kenney and eventually perhaps an Anyone But Jason Kenney, and a long four years to make a comeback.

ANOTHER ERA HAS PASSED


Canada’s Prime Minister Stephen Harper arrives at Rideau Hall to ask Governor General David Johnston to dissolve Parliament, beginning the longest federal election campaign in recent history, in Ottawa August 2, 2015. (Blair Gable/Reuters) © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2015.

Some party activists and organizers remained proud of their campaign, crediting the majority defeat to the NDP’s tremendous collapse. But some felt less need to follow the former leader’s no-regrets line, and second-guessed the Conservative strategy. “What was there to vote for?” asked one former cabinet aide. “ ‘We’re going to keep things going, the way they are?’ That’s not going to get people excited in a change election.”

In 2004, Harper had to accept a Liberal win in his first election as Conservative leader, in a race his backers thought was theirs. As he congratulated the Liberals, the thunderstick-wagging crowd began booing. Harper tried to redirect the crowd by clapping off-mic, and the crowd followed suit.


STEPHEN HARPER WAVES GOOD BYE.

Eleven years later, as Harper welcomed another Liberal’s victory—“Canadians have elected a Liberal government, a result we accept without hesitation”—there were no boos. Instead, the crowd politely applauded, an acknowledgement an era has passed.


INQUIRER

Candidates woo Fil-Canadians for Oct. 19 federal elections By: Marisa Roque @inquirerdotnet INQUIRER.net U.S. Bureau 01:34 AM September 18th, 2015


Prof. Tony San Juan explaining the formation of a political action council, on candidates’ night at the Philippine Press Club of Ontario. PHOTOS BY MARISA ROQUE

TORONTO, Ontario — Candidates from three of Canada’s major political parties faced Filipino Canadians at a political forum hosted by the Philippine Press Club of Ontario, in anticipation of the coming October 19 federal elections.
Leaders from volunteer community organizations, members of nonprofit associations and the Filipino Canadian media community, and election campaign workers on September 8 gathered for a working dinner at Casa Manila on York Mills Road.

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Michael Levitt, Liberal Party.

Michael Levitt, the first speaker, is running under the Liberal banner for a seat in Toronto’s York Centre riding. York Centre has a strong Filipino community, and Levitt emphasized the issues of immigration, health care, employment and women’s concerns such as shelters and assisted daycare.

Levitt spoke of his party’s plan to increase the amount of government money given to parents to $560 per month. “Nine out of ten families will get tax breaks,” Levitt added.


Fil-Canadian candidate Julius Tiangson of the Progressive Conservatives.

Julius Tiangson spoke next. Tiangson is the only Filipino Canadian in Ontario running for a seat in the upcoming federal elections, seeking to represent the riding of Mississauga West.

Tiangson stressed the Progressive Conservatives’ platform of keeping taxes low, seeking to balance the budget, building a government that facilitates business but with less government intervention, and national security.

Tiangson also spoke of the current government’s emphasis on individual freedoms juxtaposed against Canada’s growing role as a player in the global economy, with trade increasing between Canada and Europe and the prospective Trans Pacific Partnership.


Incumbent MP Dan Harris of the National Democratic Party.

The third speaker, Dan Harris, is a sitting member of Parliament currently representing the riding of Scarborough Southwest. Harris is a member of the National Democratic Party (NDP), which rode the cresting tide of popularity of the party’s deceased former leader, Jack Layton, to capture the role of the formal opposition in Parliament in the last federal election.

“We want to double the CPP (Canada Pension Plan) monthly amount given to seniors, return delivery of mail to individual homes, and pull the retirement age back to 65 from 67,” said Harris. “We want to balance the budget through more cuts down the road, yet bringing up spending on education and health. We want to see a move away from a resource-based economy,” Harris added.

A lively question and answer period followed the presentations, with Tony San Juan, a local thought leader and professional educator, informing the audience of the formation of the Political Action Council. This group seeks to engender political capacity among Filipino Canadians by encouraging interest and participation in the Canadian political process.


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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