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PHNO HEADLINE NEWS THIS PAST WEEK
(Mini Reads followed by Full Reports below)

REFUGEE TRAGEDY: GLOBAL OUTRAGE, PHOTO OF DEAD CHILD IN BEACH, HAUNTS, AWAKENS WORLD


SEPTEMBER 4 -A paramilitary police officer carries the lifeless body of Aylan Kurdi, 3, after a number of migrants died and a smaller number were reported missing after boats carrying them to the Greek island of Kos capsized, near the Turkish resort of Bodrum. AP/DHA
 

The photo of the dead 3-year-old Syrian boy on a Turkish beach is haunting. It captures everything we don't want to see when we tap our phones or open our newspapers: a vicious civil war, a surge of refugees, the death of an innocent. The image of little Aylan Kurdi is hammering home the Syrian migrant crisis to the world, largely through social media. Aylan died along with his 5-year-old brother and their mother when their small rubber boat capsized as it headed for Greece. "It is a very painful picture to view," said Peter Bouckaert, who as director of emergencies at Human Rights Watch has witnessed his fair share of painful scenes. "It had me in tears when it first showed up on my mobile phone. I had to think hard whether to share this." But share, he did. Bouckaert, who is in Hungary watching the crisis unfold, said people need to be pushed to look at the "ghastly spectacle" so they can, in turn, prod governments to help the suffering Syrian people. Still, will the disturbing image galvanize people into action? Will it be like other seared-in-our-memory photographs — a vulture hovering over starving child in Sudan, a girl fleeing a napalm attack in Vietnam, the child in a firefighter's arms after the Oklahoma City bombing? READ MORE...

ALSO Here in Canada: Father of Aylan Kurdi, drowned Syrian boy, describes desperate ordeal to save family
[‘I don’t blame the Canadian government, I blame the whole world'. When asked what should be done, he answered, 'Stop this war"]


SEPT 3 -Abdullah Kurdi
"I was holding my wife's hand, my children slipped away from my hands," Abdullah Kurdi said in a statement to police obtained by the Turkish newspaper Hurriyet. "We tried to hold on to the boat. Everyone was screaming in pitch darkness. I couldn't make my voice heard to my wife and kids." Turkey Migrants Family Drowns Abdullah Kurdi, 40, father of Syrian boys Alan, 3, and Galib, 5, whose bodies washed up on a beach in Turkey on Wednesday, said he lost his grip on his two sons when the rowboat they were in capsized while trying to cross from Turkey to Greece. (Associated Press) Abdullah Kurdi spoke publicly for the first time Thursday after he identified the bodies of his wife and sons in a Turkish morgue and prepared to take them home to Syria. Kurdi said he got on a boat with 13 people, including the man steering the boat. He said the boat was heavy in the water. "We sailed in the sea for about four to five minutes," he said. "The man steering the boat saw that the sea was high, the waves were high. "We were hit by the first wave and he jumped into the water and escaped away. I tried to take over the steering but we were hit by another wave. The boat capsized. I grabbed my children and my wife. But they died." The father said he just wanted "to sit next to the grave of my children and my wife, and rest." READ MORE...


ALSO: Refugee crisis, drowned Syrian boy shift focus of Canadian election campaign

[Conservative Leader Stephen Harper says Canada must maintain resolve in anti-ISIS mission]


SEPT 3 -Abdullah Kurdi, 40, father of Syrian boys Alan, 3, and Galip, 5, who were washed up drowned on a Turkish beach, said he will likely return to Syria. Abdullah Kurdi, 40, father of Syrian boys Alan, 3, and Galip, 5, who were washed up drowned on a Turkish beach, said he will likely return to Syria. (Mehmet Can Meral/AP)
Chris Alexander pauses his election campaign in wake of refugee crisis Chris Alexander takes heat online after death of young Syrian refugees. The focus of the federal election campaign shifted Thursday to the refugee crisis after images emerged of a Syrian toddler's body washed up on a Turkish beach, and the boy's aunt, who lives in Coquitlam, B.C., said she had been trying to help his family resettle in Canada. The photos of the drowned three-year-old made international headlines Wednesday. The boy's mother and brother also drowned while trying to make the perilous journey from Turkey to the Greek island of Kos. His father survived.
On Thursday Fin Donnelly — the NDP MP for Port Moody-Coquitlam — said he had personally delivered a letter on the relatives' behalf to Immigration Minister Chris Alexander in March, asking him to grant the boy's entire family refugee status. However the boy's aunt, Tima Kurdi, later said the letter referred to her brother, Mohammed, and his family. The boy who drowned was the son of her other brother, Abdullah Kurdi. Aunt of drowned Syrian boy says 'they didn't deserve to die'  Conservative Leader Stephen Harper said he and his wife Laureen saw the tragic photos online and that it evoked images of their own son, Ben, frolicking at that age. While the images were "heart wrenching," refugee policy alone is "not a solution to this problem," he said, adding that Canada will admit more refugees from the region but must also continue to "fight the root cause of the problem and that is the violent campaign being waged against these people by ISIS." That's why Canada must stay the course, both militarily and by providing humanitarian aid to those affected by the continuing violence, he said. READ MORE ABOUT TRUDEAU, MULCAIR, PARTI QUEBECOIS STATEMENTS...

ALSO from TWITTER: Artists mourn Syrian boy's death through gut-wrenching artworks - #HumanityWashedAshore


SEPTEMBER 4 -One of illustrations about the drowned Syrian toddler named Aylan Kurdi. Photo from Twitter  On Thursday, graphic photos of a drowned Syrian toddler named Aylan Kurdi horrified the whole world. The photo showing the toddler washed up on the beach swept across social media, sending a strong and heartbreaking message to the people around the borders. According to reports, Aylan, alongside other war refugees died when a boat capsized while carrying them to the Greek island of Kos. He and his family were reportedly going to his aunt in Canada to seek refuge.
The hashtag  "KiyiyaVuranInsanlik," which means "humanity washed ashore" in English became a top trending topic on Twitter. Artists from all over the world took their feelings on their hands and illustrated the sadness and frustration that they felt upon hearing the tragic news. Here are some of the most heart-wrenching artworks from social media: WATCH THE REST OF HEART-RENDING ARTWORKS....

ALSO: Drowned refugee boys, mother buried in Syria; crackdown crumbles in Hungary


SEPTEMBER 4 -Three graves that were dug for the two Syrian toddlers and their mother, all of whom drowned as they were trying to reach Greece, are pictured during their funeral in the Syrian border town of Kobani September 4, 2015. REUTERS/RODI SAID A Syrian father on Friday buried his wife and two little boys, drowned as they tried to flee to Europe, while hundreds of migrants fled from a detention camp and escaped a train stranded under police siege in Hungary. Hungary's hardline leader said Europeans could end up a minority on their own continent as a crackdown appeared to crumble in his own country, the main entry point for tens of thousands of refugees and migrants reaching the EU by land over the Balkan peninsula. Hungary has canceled all trains to western Europe to prevent migrants from traveling on and seeking sanctuary in richer countries north and west. Its prime minister, Viktor Orban, says he is enforcing EU rules by forcing all migrants into camps to register, rather than let them proceed on to other countries. But hundreds escaped on Friday from a camp near the southern border and later clashed with police there. Hundreds more fled from a train that had been halted west the capital Budapest. Others crossed police barricades to set off on foot from the capital's train station, heading west for the distant Austrian border led by a Syrian refugee with one leg. Orban's chief of staff, Janos Lazar, said Hungary would lay on buses to transport the 1,200 migrants on foot and thousands more still at the station to the border in coming hours. An Austrian Interior Ministry spokesman said Vienna had been informed and together with humanitarian organizations was preparing for their arrival. Austrian police said the driver of a truck found abandoned last week with the bodies of 71 migrants in the back was among a group of people arrested in Hungary, and gave new details about their deaths. Dozens more had narrowly avoided death by using a crowbar to escape from another truck owned by the same Bulgarian man, they said. More than 300,000 people have crossed to Europe by sea so far this year and more than 2,600 have died doing so. Many of those making the voyage are refugees from the civil war in Syria, now in its fifth year. More deaths at sea were reported on Friday. About 30-40 people drowned in the Mediterranean off the coast of Libya after a dinghy carrying 120-140 Somalis, Sudanese and Nigerians deflated, causing panic on board, the International Organization for Migration said. In the Syrian town of Kobani, 3-year-old Aylan Kurdi was laid to rest alongside his mother and 5-year-old brother at the "Martyr's Cemetery" in the predominantly Kurdish community near the Turkish border. READ MORE...

ALSO: Migrant crisis: Hungary migrants start walk to border


SEPTEMBER 5 -Map showing Hungary, Austria and motorway between them. It is 240km (150 miles) from the Hungarian capital to Vienna Large groups of refugees and migrants in Hungary are trying to walk to the Austrian border, after defying official efforts to stop them. Hungary has announced it will send buses to transport them to the border. As darkness fell, police advised around 1,000 walkers on the main motorway to Vienna to put on light-coloured clothing so that they could be seen. Earlier on Friday another group escaped along railway tracks in Bicske, to the west, from a train stopped by police. European Union states are struggling to agree on how to deal with the crisis. The Hungarian, Czech, Slovakian and Polish prime ministers have rejected quotas for EU nations. In a statement the leaders rejected "any proposal leading to introduction of mandatory and permanent quota for solidarity measures". CONTINUE READING...RELATED BBC REPORT: 'Migrants arrive in Austria after Hungary provides buses'.....


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

SYRIAN REFUGEES: Image of dead child on beach, haunts, awakens the world


A paramilitary police officer carries the lifeless body of Aylan Kurdi, 3, after a number of migrants died and a smaller number were reported missing after boats carrying them to the Greek island of Kos capsized, near the Turkish resort of Bodrum. AP/DHA

!!WARNING: HEARTBREAKING PHOTOS IN THIS PAGE....

MANILA, SEPTEMBER 7, 2015, (PHILSTAR) By Tamara Lush (Associated Press) | Updated September 4, 2015 - The photo of the dead 3-year-old Syrian boy on a Turkish beach is haunting.

It captures everything we don't want to see when we tap our phones or open our newspapers: a vicious civil war, a surge of refugees, the death of an innocent.

The image of little Aylan Kurdi is hammering home the Syrian migrant crisis to the world, largely through social media. Aylan died along with his 5-year-old brother and their mother when their small rubber boat capsized as it headed for Greece.

"It is a very painful picture to view," said Peter Bouckaert, who as director of emergencies at Human Rights Watch has witnessed his fair share of painful scenes. "It had me in tears when it first showed up on my mobile phone. I had to think hard whether to share this."

But share, he did. Bouckaert, who is in Hungary watching the crisis unfold, said people need to be pushed to look at the "ghastly spectacle" so they can, in turn, prod governments to help the suffering Syrian people.


'My Children Slipped Through My Hands' says Father of Drowned Syrian Boy

Still, will the disturbing image galvanize people into action? Will it be like other seared-in-our-memory photographs — a vulture hovering over starving child in Sudan, a girl fleeing a napalm attack in Vietnam, the child in a firefighter's arms after the Oklahoma City bombing?

READ MORE...

Or will it become just another of the many images on social media, lost amid the flotsam?

"One of the things about this story is that it's really difficult sometimes for the world to get a handle on it," said Al Tompkins, a senior faculty member at the Poynter Institute, a center for media studies in St. Petersburg, Florida. "Regardless of the technology, a singular iconic image can still touch us in ways."

And that singular image is often of a child. That was the cold fact that unsettled people around the globe.

Kathleen Fetters-Iossi, a 47-year-old fiction writer from West Bend, Wisconsin, said she hopes people share the images to create awareness, then go beyond that to try to help in some way. But she has her doubts any concrete action will come of it.

"Most Americans, if they're just now becoming aware of this issue, will ultimately feel there's nothing we can do," she said. "They feel like we can't handle our own immigration problem, let alone Europe's. Social media can help by creating wider awareness, but ultimately, 'clicktivism' didn't help the Nigerian girls, and it's not going to help those migrants."

In Greece, Alicia Stallings, a mother of two, said she won't link to the photo. It's too close to home.


Aylan (left) and Galib Kurdi slipped off his father's hand and drowned.

"I watch my kids swim and play in the Aegean and am sometimes struck by horror when I think this is the same water in which children just like them are drowning every day," she wrote in an email.

"One hates for something like this be the galvanizing element — we are pretty hard-hearted if we can ignore all the other hundreds of drownings happening all the time. But the scale is vast, and as humans it is easier for us to comprehend one specific tragedy, in a shirt and shoes like our own kids."

(While Turkish authorities gave the boy's first name as Aylan, an aunt in Canada gave a different transliteration: Alan.)


Body of little Aylan Kurdi

The photo of the body washed up on the sand was splashed on the front of all major newspapers in Brazil, a nation with more homicides than any other, according to the United Nations. Still, the picture ignited despair and indignation.

Ary Cordovil, a 35-year-old barber, lives near one of Rio de Janeiro's slums, where a drug gang war has meant nobody leaves home after dark and schools have been shut for weeks.

"I'm used to violence. Brazil is used to seeing violence. But this — this is just painful," he said, staring hard at the image in a newspaper. "He's just a baby trying to flee a war. The absurdity of this is extreme even for us."

It inspired people like a 52-year-old grandmother from Australia to tweet multiple versions of the story.

"If these images of a dead child don't change our attitude to refugees, what will?" tweeted Jenny Fawcett of Warrnambool, Australia. Her daughter started a petition calling on the Australian government to help more Syrian refugees.

Jeremy Barnicle, chief development officer of the humanitarian group Mercy Corps in Portland, Oregon, said it remains to be seen whether the outpouring of grief on social media for Aylan will translate into tangible help.

"For many Americans, the conflict in the Middle East is distant and complicated, and therefore tough to engage on," he said. "A photo like this reminds people why we should all care."


Seems so peaceful now. Where and how can peace be? Why is he suddenly dead? His smile gone!

While the image of the body on the sand was on many international websites, many U.S. sites ran a photo of a Turkish police officer carrying the limp boy in his arms. The boy's face is obscured.

Mike Wilson, editor of The Dallas Morning News, decided to run the tamer photo. He received an email from a reader who said the picture was "gory."

"I wrote back and told her that I appreciated her sensitivity," he said. "We chose it specifically because it wasn't gory. It's just a forlorn, heartbreaking image that tells the reality of what's happening."


CBC CANADA

Father of Alan Kurdi, drowned Syrian boy, describes desperate ordeal to save family CBC News Posted: Sep 03, 2015 12:29 AM PT Last Updated: Sep 03, 2015 3:03 PM PT

WARNING: Story contains a disturbing image

WATCH: Father relates heartbreaking story of family's last moments 1:28


From the National Post, Toronto: Conservative Chris Alexander pauses his election campaign in wake of refugee crisis: Canada says it never denied a refugee application for Alan Kurdi and his family Republish Reprint National Post Staff | September 3, 2015 3:11 PM ET

Chris Alexander suspends re-election campaign in wake of refugee crisis. The focus of election campaign shifts to refugee crisis.

The death of Kurdi's three-year-old son, Alan, who drowned along with his brother, Galib, 5, and mother, Reham, has drawn worldwide attention to the Syrian refugee crisis and placed the Canadian government under fire after it emerged the family had been trying to come to Canada with the help of their aunt, Tima Kurdi.

Later the news media issued this correction:

Corrections
A previous version of this story said the family of Alan Kurdi had applied for refugee status in Canada. In fact, no formal application for refugee status was made. An application on behalf of Alan's uncle, Mohammed Kurdi, was received by the Department of Citizenship and Immigration Canada but was returned because, the department said, it was incomplete and did not meet the regulatory requirements for proof of refugee status recognition. Sep 03, 2015 11:53 AM PT

The father of a Syrian toddler whose body washed up on a Turkish beach says his boys "slipped away" from his hands after their rowboat capsized trying to reach the Greek island of Kos from Turkey with several other refugees.


Abdullah Kurdi

"I was holding my wife's hand, my children slipped away from my hands," Abdullah Kurdi said in a statement to police obtained by the Turkish newspaper Hurriyet.

"We tried to hold on to the boat. Everyone was screaming in pitch darkness. I couldn't make my voice heard to my wife and kids."

Turkey Migrants Family Drowns Abdullah Kurdi, 40, father of Syrian boys Alan, 3, and Galib, 5, whose bodies washed up on a beach in Turkey on Wednesday, said he lost his grip on his two sons when the rowboat they were in capsized while trying to cross from Turkey to Greece. (Associated Press)

Abdullah Kurdi spoke publicly for the first time Thursday after he identified the bodies of his wife and sons in a Turkish morgue and prepared to take them home to Syria.

Kurdi said he got on a boat with 13 people, including the man steering the boat. He said the boat was heavy in the water.


Abdullah Kurdi with his sons Alan (left) and Galib. Little boy in Syria asked the aunt in Canada, 'Will you buy me a bicycle?" ABDULLAH KURDI VIA FACEBOOK

"We sailed in the sea for about four to five minutes," he said. "The man steering the boat saw that the sea was high, the waves were high.

"We were hit by the first wave and he jumped into the water and escaped away. I tried to take over the steering but we were hit by another wave. The boat capsized. I grabbed my children and my wife. But they died."

The father said he just wanted "to sit next to the grave of my children and my wife, and rest."

READ MORE...

Kurdi also said Thursday that Canadian officials offered him citizenship after seeing what happened, but he declined.

But Citizenship and Immigration Canada released a statement Thursday afternoon saying "Canada did not offer citizenship to Mr. Abdullah Kurdi."

Sister sought to sponsor relatives

Kurdi's sister Tima immigrated to Canada several years ago and said she has been trying since at least March to help Abdullah and another brother and their families come to Canada, but Citizenship and Immigration clarified Thursday that no formal application for refugee status was made on behalf of Abdullah's family.

"There was no record of an application received for Mr. Abdullah Kurdi and his family," a statement from the department said.


Kurdi boys family photo released by aunt Tima Kurdi Sept 3 2015 Alan, left, and his older brother, Galib, seen in an undated family photo, drowned along with their mother while trying to cross the Aegean Sea. (Tima Kurdi/Canadian Press)

The department confirmed that an application was made on behalf of his brother, Mohammed.

"An application for Mr. Mohammed Kurdi and his family was received by the department but was returned as it was incomplete as it did not meet regulatory requirements for proof of refugee status recognition," the statement said.


Fin DonnellyVerified account @FinDonnelly
NDP Candidate in Port Moody-Coquitlam running for re-election.
Coquitlam, BC, Canada

NDP MP Fin Donnelly, who represents New Westminster–Coquitlam and is running in the Port Moody–Coquitlam riding in the Oct. 19 federal election, said Wednesday that Tima Kurdi approached his office in March and requested help with sponsoring her relatives as refugees.

"She was very concerned, obviously, with what was going on in Syria and wanted to get her family out," Donnelly said.

Minister 'promised' to look into it: MP

Donnelly said after considering the options, they decided to write to the Canadian Immigration Minister Chris Alexander directly — a letter that Donnelly said he delivered.

"[Alexander] promised that he would look into it, to me. I thought … he would actually do it," said Donnelly.

"We did get some requests for detailed information about the family from his staff to mine … then nothing."

Donnelly said Canada must do more to help and shelter Syrian refugees.

"Obviously, this is devastating for the family," he said.

"We need to address the situation. We need to look at how we can bring people into our country."

More than four million refugees have fled Syria since the civil war began in 2011. There are also more than seven million internally displaced people within Syria.


EUROPE-MIGRANTS/GREECE Migrants and refugees from Syria and Africa on a dinghy approach the Greek island of Kos after crossing the Aegean Sea from Turkey last month. More than four million refugees have fled Syria since a civil war began in 2011. (Yannis Behrakis/Reuters)

Alexander, who is running for the Conservative Party in the Ontario riding of Ajax, on Thursday announced he is interrupting his re-election campaign in order to address the refugee crisis.

In an interview Wednesday on CBC's Power & Politics, he had defended Canada's refugee response while also castigating the media for not reporting more on the migrant crisis.

In a statement announcing he is returning to Ottawa Thursday, Alexander said Canada has already resettled nearly 22,000 Iraqis and 2,300 Syrians and has set targets to accept 23,000 Iraqi and 11,300 Syrian refugees.

Corrections

A previous version of this story said the family of Alan Kurdi had applied for refugee status in Canada. In fact, no formal application for refugee status was made. An application on behalf of Alan's uncle, Mohammed Kurdi, was received by the Department of Citizenship and Immigration Canada but was returned because, the department said, it was incomplete and did not meet the regulatory requirements for proof of refugee status recognition. Sep 03, 2015 11:53 AM PT


CBC CANADA

Refugee crisis, drowned Syrian boy shift focus of Canadian election campaign Conservative Leader Stephen Harper says Canada must maintain resolve in anti-ISIS mission CBC News Posted: Sep 03, 2015 9:27 AM ET Last Updated: Sep 03, 2015 5:54 PM ET


Abdullah Kurdi, 40, father of Syrian boys Alan, 3, and Galip, 5, who were washed up drowned on a Turkish beach, said he will likely return to Syria. (Mehmet Can Meral/AP)

Chris Alexander pauses his election campaign in wake of refugee crisis Chris Alexander takes heat online after death of young Syrian refugees.

The focus of the federal election campaign shifted Thursday to the refugee crisis after images emerged of a Syrian toddler's body washed up on a Turkish beach, and the boy's aunt, who lives in Coquitlam, B.C., said she had been trying to help his family resettle in Canada.


THE AUNT LIVES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA; Tima Kurdi is overcome with emotion as she looks at photos of her late nephews at her home in Coquitlam, B.C. PHOTOSzoom DARRYL DYCK / THE CANADIAN PRESS

The photos of the drowned three-year-old made international headlines Wednesday. The boy's mother and brother also drowned while trying to make the perilous journey from Turkey to the Greek island of Kos. His father survived.

On Thursday Fin Donnelly — the NDP MP for Port Moody-Coquitlam — said he had personally delivered a letter on the relatives' behalf to Immigration Minister Chris Alexander in March, asking him to grant the boy's entire family refugee status.

However the boy's aunt, Tima Kurdi, later said the letter referred to her brother, Mohammed, and his family. The boy who drowned was the son of her other brother, Abdullah Kurdi.

Aunt of drowned Syrian boy says 'they didn't deserve to die'

Conservative Leader Stephen Harper said he and his wife Laureen saw the tragic photos online and that it evoked images of their own son, Ben, frolicking at that age.

While the images were "heart wrenching," refugee policy alone is "not a solution to this problem," he said, adding that Canada will admit more refugees from the region but must also continue to "fight the root cause of the problem and that is the violent campaign being waged against these people by ISIS."

That's why Canada must stay the course, both militarily and by providing humanitarian aid to those affected by the continuing violence, he said.

READ MORE...

Stephen Harper: Conservative leader federal election 2015 Conservative Leader Stephen Harper said that in addition to resettling more refugees, Canada must maintain its resolve in the U.S.-led military campaign against ISIS. (Adrian Wyld/Canadian Press)

"We need to help people who are actually there and can't get away. And part of the way we need to help them is to stop the awful violence that is being directed at them, displacing them and killing them."

Canada has contributed six CF-18 fighter jets and 69 special forces soldiers training Kurdish fighters to the international coalition fighting the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria.

"It is simply not acceptable to pretend that you can deal with this crisis by dealing with just one small aspect of it," Harper said, referring to calls for the government to immediately start accepting more refugees.

Harper's comments contrasted with those of the other major party leaders, who called for Canada to immediately accept more refugees.


--Trudeau: 'you don't get to suddenly discover compassion in the middle of an election campaign'0:52 

Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau said that Canada should resettle 25,000 refugees from Syria as soon as possible, a figure he has posed on several occasions in recent months.

Alan Kurdi, washed ashore, suddenly refocuses Syrian tragedy Should pictures of a drowned boy be shared on social media? "All different stripes of governments in Canada have stepped up in times of crisis to accept people fleeing for their lives," he said. "Canadians get it. This is about doing the right thing, about living up to the values that we cherish as a country."

Earlier Thursday, Alexander — a Conservative candidate in Ajax, Ont. — left the campaign trail to return to Ottawa deal with the case of the Syrian family drowned while defending the government's record on accepting refugees.

"Canada has one of the most generous per capita immigration and refugee resettlement programs in the world. In fact, Canada resettles more than one in ten refugees world-wide," he said in a statement.

He also pointed to Harper's recent pledge to resettle an additional 10,000 "persecuted ethnic and religious minorities" from the Middle East.

'Canada could be doing more'

Trudeau, however, said the government has repeatedly ignored calls from opposition parties and international groups to accept more refugees from Syria and other nations ravaged by war and internal strife.

"You don't get to suddenly discover compassion in the middle of an election campaign. You either have it or you don't. This government has ignored the pleas of Canadian NGOs [non-governmental organizations], opposition parties and the international community that all believe Canada could be doing more, should have been doing more," he said.


Mulcair: "As a dad and a grandfather it's unbearable that we're doing nothing."3:10

Trudeau spoke from Brossard, Que., where he announced that a Grit government would reverse Conservative plans to implement a toll for drivers using Montreal's Champlain Bridge. The new bridge, currently under construction, is expected to cost $4.23 billion and is scheduled for completion in 2018.

Speaking during a campaign stop in Toronto, NDP Leader Tom Mulcair said the photos will "define an era." He added that while Alexander "has some questions to answer," assigning blame will not solve the problem.

"The international community has failed. Canada has failed. I just want us to start acting now, as do all Canadians," he said.

"As a dad and a grandfather, it is unbearable that we are doing nothing," he added, fighting back tears as he spoke.

When asked about how many people he would commit to resettling in Canada, Mulcair said the government should accept 10,000 right away and move forward from there.

"I don't want us to wait until Oct. 19," the date of the election, he said. "I want us to act immediately."

Mulcair was speaking at a downtown Toronto cafe, where he promised an NDP government would convene a first ministers' meeting within six months of taking office to come up with a plan and a timetable for expanding the Canada and Quebec pension plans.


Bloc Leader Gilles Duceppe.

Meanwhile on Thursday afternoon, the Bloc Québécois issued a statement calling for an "electoral truce" on the issue of accepting refugees from the Middle East.

"We must do our part immediately, providing logistical support and opening our doors to refugees immediately. This is a humanitarian duty," said Bloc Leader Gilles Duceppe.

Off the campaign trail, the deputy premier of Nova Scotia Diana Whalen told CBC News that the province was ready to work with Ottawa to accept more refugees.

Similarly, Ottawa Mayor Jim Watson said he would be working with Toronto Mayor John Tory and Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson to determine "what role the municipal sector can play," in assisting the federal government to resettle more refugees in the coming months.

Corrections

A previous version of this story said the family of Alan Kurdi had applied for refugee status in Canada. In fact, no formal application for refugee status was made. An application on behalf of Alan's uncle, Mohammed Kurdi, was received by the Department of Citizenship and Immigration Canada but was returned because, the department said, it was incomplete and did not meet the regulatory requirements for proof of refugee status recognition. Sep 03, 2015 3:21 PM ET

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RELATED FROM PHILSTAR

Drowned Syrian boys' aunt fights to bring family to Canada (Associated Press) | Updated September 5, 2015 - 2:12pm


FILE - In this Thursday, Sept. 3, 2015 file photo, Tima Kurdi is overcome with emotion as she looks at photos of her late nephews Alan and Galib Kurdi, at her home in Coquitlam, British Columbia, Canada. The body of 3-year-old Syrian, Alan, was found on a Turkish beach after the small rubber boat he, his 5-year old brother Galib and their mother, Rehan, were in capsized during a voyage from Turkey to Greece. The family said the spelling of the boys' names had been changed by Turkish authorities to "Aylan" and "Galip," but are actually spelled as "Alan" and "Galib." Canada has long prided itself for opening its doors wider than any nation to asylum seekers, but the number it welcomes has waned since the Conservative Prime Minister Stephen Harper took power almost 10 years ago. Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press via AP

COQUITLAM, British Columbia — The aunt of a drowned Syrian boy whose death has sparked global outrage about the plight of refugees in Europe says she still hopes to bring the rest of her family to Canada.

Tima Kurdi said through tears outside her home in Coquitlam, British Columbia, that she plans to help her brother, Abdullah, and her other siblings immigrate to the country she made home more than two decades ago.

Abdullah isn't ready to leave his Syrian hometown of Kobani, where his sons, 3-year-old Aylan and 5-year-old Ghalib, and wife Rehanna were buried on Friday, she said. They drowned earlier this week after piling into an overloaded boat in Bodrum, Turkey, headed for the Greek island of Kos. Her brother was among the few survivors.

"We're all emotionally affected by what happened right now," Kurdi said, surrounded by framed photos of her nephews. "I'm sure he (will) refuse and he doesn't want to leave Kobani."

She added: "But one day, I will bring him here. He cannot be by himself there."

Kurdi has previously said she wanted to bring both her brothers to Canada, but she applied first for her eldest sibling Mohammed, whose application was rejected because it was incomplete.

She said that Mohammed's failed application prompted Abdullah to embark on the risky journey with his family. She said she sent him $5,000 to pay smugglers to take them in a boat.

Asked whether her brother blames himself, Kurdi said no.

"I am the one who should be at blame," she said. "I blame myself because my brother does not have money. I sent him the money to pay the smuggler. If I didn't send him the money, those people still (would be) alive."

She said the trip was the "only option" left for the family to have a better life in a European country, possibly Germany or Sweden.

They were fleeing horrors in Syria, where militants from the Islamic State group had beheaded one of her sister-in-law's relatives. Kurdi said her brother had emailed her a photo of the killing but she deleted it because it was too horrific.

Abdullah knew of the dangers, including the risk of smugglers using fake life-jackets, she said, adding he had planned to pay 2,000 euros ($2,230) each for him and his wife to board a safer jet boat, compared to 1,200 euros ($1,338) for a rubber boat. There was no fee for the two boys.

Photos of Aylan's lifeless body on a beach in Turkey have put Canada's refugee policy in the spotlight, though Kurdi said she doesn't blame the Canadian government.

She said she hopes Citizenship and Immigration Canada stops requiring a document missing from Mohammed's application because it's impossible for people to secure the necessary paperwork amid a crisis in Syria.

Kurdi spoke to both her brothers by phone on Friday and watched emotional video on CNN of her two young nephews being buried in Kobani.

She said she desperately wished she could be there with her brother to say goodbye.

"Abdullah said to me, 'I don't want you to come. It's dangerous,'" she said, weeping. "I (could) stay there for the rest of my life, sitting beside their grave, feed them, give them water."

Her grieving brother is proud of his kids for becoming a symbol of the dire situation facing Syrian refugees, and hopes to see leaders step in to end human smuggling, Kurdi said.

"He said, 'I don't need anything from this world anymore. What I have is gone.' But my kids, and my wife, it's a wake-up call for the world. And hopefully they step in and help others."


PHILSTAR

#HumanityWashedAshore: Artists mourn Syrian boy's death through gut-wrenching artworks By Alixandra Caole Vila (philstar.com) | Updated September 4, 2015 - 2:36pm


One of illustrations about the drowned Syrian toddler named Aylan Kurdi. Photo from Twitter
 

On Thursday, graphic photos of a drowned Syrian toddler named Aylan Kurdi horrified the whole world.

The photo showing the toddler washed up on the beach swept across social media, sending a strong and heartbreaking message to the people around the borders.

According to reports, Aylan, alongside other war refugees died when a boat capsized while carrying them to the Greek island of Kos. He and his family were reportedly going to his aunt in Canada to seek refuge.

The hashtag  "KiyiyaVuranInsanlik," which means "humanity washed ashore" in English became a top trending topic on Twitter.


THIS ONE IS FROM https://twitter.com/AzzamDaaboul  (There are more...)

Artists from all over the world took their feelings on their hands and illustrated the sadness and frustration that they felt upon hearing the tragic news. Here are some of the most heart-wrenching artworks from social media:

CLICK HERE TO WATCH TWEETS >> #HumanityWashedAshore


REUTERS

Drowned refugee boys, mother buried in Syria; crackdown crumbles in Hungary KOBANI, SYRIA/ROSZKE, HUNGARY | BY RODI SAID AND KRISZTINA THAN


Three graves that were dug for the two Syrian toddlers and their mother, all of whom drowned as they were trying to reach Greece, are pictured during their funeral in the Syrian border town of Kobani September 4, 2015. REUTERS/RODI SAID

A Syrian father on Friday buried his wife and two little boys, drowned as they tried to flee to Europe, while hundreds of migrants fled from a detention camp and escaped a train stranded under police siege in Hungary.

Hungary's hardline leader said Europeans could end up a minority on their own continent as a crackdown appeared to crumble in his own country, the main entry point for tens of thousands of refugees and migrants reaching the EU by land over the Balkan peninsula.

Hungary has canceled all trains to western Europe to prevent migrants from traveling on and seeking sanctuary in richer countries north and west. Its prime minister, Viktor Orban, says he is enforcing EU rules by forcing all migrants into camps to register, rather than let them proceed on to other countries.


Hungarian policemen stand by the family of migrants as they wanted to run away at the railway station in the town of Bicske, Hungary, September 3, 2015. REUTERS/LASZLO BALOGH

But hundreds escaped on Friday from a camp near the southern border and later clashed with police there. Hundreds more fled from a train that had been halted west the capital Budapest. Others crossed police barricades to set off on foot from the capital's train station, heading west for the distant Austrian border led by a Syrian refugee with one leg.

Orban's chief of staff, Janos Lazar, said Hungary would lay on buses to transport the 1,200 migrants on foot and thousands more still at the station to the border in coming hours.

An Austrian Interior Ministry spokesman said Vienna had been informed and together with humanitarian organizations was preparing for their arrival.


A migrant holds a sign in front of Keleti railway station in Budapest, Hungary, September 4, 2015. REUTERS/BERNADETT SZABO

Austrian police said the driver of a truck found abandoned last week with the bodies of 71 migrants in the back was among a group of people arrested in Hungary, and gave new details about their deaths. Dozens more had narrowly avoided death by using a crowbar to escape from another truck owned by the same Bulgarian man, they said.

More than 300,000 people have crossed to Europe by sea so far this year and more than 2,600 have died doing so. Many of those making the voyage are refugees from the civil war in Syria, now in its fifth year.


A womanl holds a picture of German Chancellor Angela Merkel as migrants set off on foot for the border with Austria from Budapest, Hungary, September 4, 2015. REUTERS/BERNADETT SZABO

More deaths at sea were reported on Friday. About 30-40 people drowned in the Mediterranean off the coast of Libya after a dinghy carrying 120-140 Somalis, Sudanese and Nigerians deflated, causing panic on board, the International Organization for Migration said.

In the Syrian town of Kobani, 3-year-old Aylan Kurdi was laid to rest alongside his mother and 5-year-old brother at the "Martyr's Cemetery" in the predominantly Kurdish community near the Turkish border.

READ MORE...

Images of Aylan's tiny body washed up on a beach near the Turkish resort of Bodrum gave a human face to the casualties and prompted a global outpouring of sympathy this week. He drowned with his brother Galip, his mother and at least nine others while trying to cross in two small boats to the Greek island of Kos just a few kilometers away.


A close up shows Aylan Kurdi (L) and his brother Galip in an undated Kurdi family photograph placed outside the home of their aunt Tima Kurdi in Coquitlam, British Columbia September 3, 2015. REUTERS/KURDI FAMILY/HANDOUT

RELATED COVERAGE › Europe should have seen refugee crisis coming: U.N. official

While pressure is rising on European governments to tackle the crisis more effectively, the boys' weeping father, Abdullah Kurdi, called on countries closer to home to act.

"I want Arab governments - not European countries - to see (what happened to) my children, and because of them to help people," he said in footage posted online by a local radio station.

The head of the United Nations' refugee agency, Antonio Guterres, called on Friday for the European Union to mobilize its "full force" to help the migrants.

The crisis has divided the 28-member EU, with countries that have accepted large numbers of migrants, led by Germany, which is planning for 800,000 asylum seekers this year, accusing those who have accepted few of shirking their moral duty.


Abdullah Kurdi, little boy Aylan's father, mourns with his relative during the funeral of his toddlers, who drowned with their mother as they were trying to reach Greece, at the Syrian border town of Kobani September 4, 2015. REUTERS/RODI SAID

Countries that have kept their doors more tightly shut say too big a welcome would make the problem worse by encouraging more people to make the journey. But this week's scenes, especially the photos of Aylan on the beach, may prompt relative hardliners like Britain's David Cameron to give way.

Senior EU officials said European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, who failed earlier this year to persuade the bloc's leaders to agree to a system to share 40,000 Syrian refugees, would try next week to convince them to take 160,000.

U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton called for a global response: "The entire world has to come together. It should not be just one or two countries, or not just Europe and the United States," Clinton told MSNBC.

AIR FOR ONLY 90 MINUTES

In Austria, police said the 71 dead migrants found alongside a motorway near the Hungarian border last week were Syrians, Iraqis and Afghans, but none had been identified. They included a baby girl, her brother, two other children and eight women.

There was enough air inside the truck for no more than 90 minutes and the people appeared to have slowly lost consciousness, suffocating before they crossed from Hungary.

RELATED COVERAGE › Europe's answer to refugee crisis should not be nationalistic: Moscovici

In southern Hungary, police gave chase as about 300 migrants fled the crowded reception center in Roszke on the border with Serbia.

Another 2,300 migrants still inside were threatening to break out too. After the escapees were returned to the camp, migrants stormed barricades and clashed with police.


Migrants and refugees wait for a registration procedure after crossing the Macedonian-Greek border near Gevgelija, Macedonia, September 4, 2015. REUTERS/STOYAN NENOV

Hungary's MTI news agency said hundreds of others had escaped from a train that had been halted west of Budapest in the town of Bicske, where riot police had failed since Thursday to force them to go to a registration camp.

"No camp. No Hungary. Freedom train,” someone had written with shaving foam on the side of the train.

Hungary blames the chaos on Germany, which has said it will let Syrians register for asylum regardless of where they entered the EU, suspending normal EU rules.

Prime Minister Orban, emerging as one of the continent's most outspoken opponents of large-scale migration, took to the airwaves to warn of dire consequences if the influx was not checked.

"Now we talk about hundreds of thousands but next year we will talk about millions and there is no end to this," he said. "All of a sudden we will see that we are in a minority in our own continent."

Back in Turkey, only a few days after Aylan Kurdi and his family set off on their fatal voyage, more Syrian refugees were planning the same crossing to the Greek island of Kos.

"We saw the picture of the baby, (but) we have no other chance," said 36-year old Abdulmenem Alsatouf, a father of three who once ran a supermarket in the Syrian city of Idlib.

(Additional reporting by Axel Bugge, Ece Toksabay, Karin Strohecker, Caroline Copley, Marton Dunai, Ece Toksabay and Rodi Said, Writing by David Stamp and Peter Graff; Editing by Angus MacSwan)


BBC WORLD NEWS LONDON

Migrant crisis: Hungary migrants start walk to border
4 September 2015


Profile: Hungary PM Viktor Orban: The Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban has been much on display this week as he raged against the hordes who “are threatening Europe’s Christian culture”. His crude language is matched by even cruder policies, as the stand-offs between police and refugees in Budapest show.


SEPTEMBER 4 -Map showing Hungary, Austria and motorway between them. It is 240km (150 miles) from the Hungarian capital to Vienna

Large groups of refugees and migrants in Hungary are trying to walk to the Austrian border, after defying official efforts to stop them.

Hungary has announced it will send buses to transport them to the border.
As darkness fell, police advised around 1,000 walkers on the main motorway to Vienna to put on light-coloured clothing so that they could be seen.

Earlier on Friday another group escaped along railway tracks in Bicske, to the west, from a train stopped by police.

European Union states are struggling to agree on how to deal with the crisis.
The Hungarian, Czech, Slovakian and Polish prime ministers have rejected quotas for EU nations.

In a statement the leaders rejected "any proposal leading to introduction of mandatory and permanent quota for solidarity measures".

As it happened: 4 September


Hundreds of migrants walk along the motorway in Budapest (4 September)Image copyrightReuters

CONTINUE READING...

The chaotic scenes in Hungary - a main transit country for those seeking to claim asylum in Germany and other countries in northern and western Europe - have continued for another day, as authorities struggle to deal with many thousands of people desperate to reach western Europe.

A group of around 1,000 who had been waiting days at Budapest's Keleti station grew frustrated with the lack of international trains, and decided to walk to Austria - a distance of 180km (110 miles).

Hungarian police seemed to be escorting but not stopping them.

The BBC's Matthew Price, walking with the migrants, says large numbers of people, some pushing wheelchairs and buggies, are walking down the hard shoulder of the main motorway from the Hungarian capital to Vienna.

Most of those he spoke to were from Iraq or Syria.

As night fell, many continued to walk, but others - including a family with five children - appeared to stop for the night on the hard shoulder, or in adjacent fields.

One man told the BBC he would continue to the Austrian border:
"Then to Vienna, then to Germany.
"We won't stop. Our target is to Germany, to our mum, to Merkel."

Meanwhile the stand-off between Hungarian police and hundreds of migrants, who refused to leave a train in Bicske for over 24 hours, has ended.

A large number of people escaped from the train on Friday afternoon and are walking along the train tracks heading west.

Those migrants who did not escape - many of them families with children - have been escorted onto buses to be taken to a transit camp.

A Pakistani man in his fifties collapsed and died after leaving the train.

Elsewhere in Hungary on Friday:

There were clashes at Keleti station after far-right extremists threw two firecrackers towards migrants, sparking an angry response.

Hundreds of people have broken out of a refugee camp at Roszke near the Serbian border and are being pursued by police. Video from the camp showed clashes between migrants, trying to break out, and riot police, who used spray.

Hungarian MPs have approved tougher border controls and penalties for migrants trying to pass through to Germany.

More than 2,000 people have joined an Austrian Facebook campaign to organise a convoy to pick up migrants and take them out of Hungary - although the Austrian interior ministry warned that participants would be liable to prosecution

Under EU regulations, anyone wishing to seek asylum must do so in the first EU country they reach.

But many of those who have arrived in Hungary do not wish to be registered there because it is more likely to send migrants back, and has a relatively small population and economy.

They want to continue on to seek asylum in Germany and other richer countries.

Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban warned on Friday of "the end of Europe".

"Today we are talking about tens of thousands but next year we will be talking about millions and this has no end," Mr Orban said.


Migrants set off on foot for the border with Austria from Budapest, Hungary, September 4, 2015Image copyrightReuters


Large crowds of people could be seen walking through Budapest. Migrants waved an EU flag as they crossed the Budapest city limits.

Antonio Guterres, head of the UN refugee agency, the UNHCR, said the crisis was a defining moment for Europe.

In a statement, he said Europe needed to build "adequate reception capacities", especially in Greece, replacing a "piecemeal" approach with a "common strategy".

In other developments:

The UK government - under pressure over its response to the crisis - has agreed to provide settlement for "thousands more" Syrian refugees and an extra £100m in aid for Syrians in the Middle East

Members of the European Commission are in the Greek island of Kos to examine the difficulties caused by the large numbers of refugees and migrants landing there

EU foreign ministers are meeting in Brussels

Some 50 migrants are feared to have drowned after their boat sank off the coast of Libya, according to the International Organization for Migration

READ: European papers seek scapegoat over migrant crisis

READ: Germany seizes fake Syrian passports

Migrants hoping to reach the Austrian border disembark from a train in the Hungarian town of Bicske, 40km (25 miles) from Budapest (4 September)
Image caption

Some migrants disembarked from the train at Bicske and set off along the rail tracks

Others were escorted to a waiting bus.


A migrant flashes a victory sign from inside a bus at Bicske railway station, Hungary, September 4, 2015.Image copyrightReuters

Many of those taken to the bus were families with children. A group of around 300 migrants escaped from this camp at Roszke, near Hungary's border with Serbia.

Migrants or refugees?

The word migrant is defined in the Oxford English Dictionary as "one who moves, either temporarily or permanently, from one place, area, or country of residence to another".

A refugee is, according to the 1951 Refugee Convention, any person who "owing to a well-founded fear" of persecution is outside their country of nationality and "unable" or "unwilling" to seek the protection of that country. To gain the status, one has to go through the legal process of claiming asylum.

The word migrant has traditionally been considered a neutral term, but some criticise the BBC and other media for using a word they say implies something voluntary, and should not be applied to people fleeing danger.

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RELATED FROM BBC

Migrants arrive in Austria after Hungary provides buses
5 September 2015


BUDAPEST, Hungary – A fleet of Hungarian buses has delivered more than 1,000 migrants to the border of Austria, where charity workers have offered the surprised newcomers beds, hot tea and a warm welcome.

Thousands of migrants have crossed into Austria, after Hungary's surprise move to take them by bus to the border.

For days the government had blocked them from travelling by train, but it relented after many began walking towards the border on Friday.

About 4,000 people arrived in Austria, with many moving on to Germany.

Meanwhile a second group has set off on foot from Budapest towards the border.

Austria says the migrants can apply for asylum there or carry on to Germany.

The move comes as European Union countries are struggling to agree on how to deal with a surge of asylum seekers - many of whom have fled conflict in Syria.

Hungary's government eased restrictions on transit after many frustrated migrants overwhelmed police cordons.


After crossing the Austrian border, migrants were taken to Vienna.

Overnight, buses picked up migrants from Keleti station in Budapest where thousands had been camped.

Vehicles were also sent to take those who had decided to walk along a motorway to Austria.

On Saturday Hungarian government spokesman Zoltan Kovacs told the BBC there would be no more buses or trains to take the migrants on to Austria.

He said the transport had been arranged as a one-off, because of fears for the migrants' safety.

But the BBC's Ben Brown reports from Budapest that the government's move seems to have encouraged migrants who later streamed into the station.

As thousands crossed the border on foot, some Austrians displayed welcome signs.

Austrian Red Cross workers at a makeshift centre greeted the migrants with blankets and tea.

"I feel [at] home," said Ayaz Morad, one of the first to arrive. "This is a great land - nice people, nice government."

The migrants were being taken to Vienna by bus and rail. Special trains to the capital are leaving the Austrian border town of Nickelsdorf every half hour.

Many immediately boarded trains for Germany. Several hundred arrived at Munich station later on Saturday.

The German government has said anyone coming from Syria can apply for asylum. It expects about 6,000 people to arrive over the weekend.

They crossed into Austria on foot - the Hungarian buses stopped before reaching the border and they had to walk the final stretch.

There were children and at least one man in a wheelchair.

They were exhausted. Some of them were limping, but many were smiling broadly - relieved to have finally left Hungary.

"Where are we?" one man shouted. "Austria," I replied. "Good," he said.

Germany has said it expects to take in 800,000 asylum seekers this year.
Austria's Chancellor Werner Faymann said that after talks with his German counterpart Angela Merkel, they would allow in the migrants.

But he said he expected Hungary to respect any EU quotas for asylum seekers - something Hungary, along with the Czech Republic, Poland and Slovakia, has rejected.

Jenny Hill reports from Munich railway station where volunteers are waiting with supplies

Hungary, a major transit point for those fleeing the Middle East and Africa, has taken measures that have underlined divisions within the EU over ways to tackle the crisis.

The government of Prime Minister Viktor Orban is building a barbed-wire fence along the border with Serbia, where it also plans to deploy extras troops and police.

On Friday the Hungarian parliament approved tougher border controls and penalties for migrants.

On Saturday, EU foreign ministers discussed the crisis at a meeting in Luxembourg.

EU foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini said they had agreed to strengthen co-operation in five areas:

Protection of asylum seekers
Border controls
Fighting trafficking networks, particularly at sea
Helping transit countries outside the EU deal with the influx
Addressing the root causes of the crisis, notably instability in Libya and the Syria conflict.

SPECIAL REPORT ALSO AT SCIENCE AND InfoTECH SECTION (SI).....


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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