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FLOYD DANCES TO VICTORY
[Unanimous decision booed by pro-Pacquiao Las Vegas crowd]


Pushed to a corner Manny Pacquiao drives Floyd Mayweather Jr. to the ropes during their “Fight of the Century” in Las Vegas on Saturday (Sunday, Philippine time). Mayweather won via unanimous decision, a verdict that broke the hearts not only of Filipinos but also of Pacquiao’s millions of fans around the world. No rematch has been talked about. AFP PHOTO
 Floyd Mayweather turned the ring into a dance floor on his way to a unanimous decision over a frustrated Manny Pacquiao here on Saturday (Sunday, Philippine time) to win the richest fight in history and cement his place in the pantheon of boxing greats. Boos rang out from a pro-Pacquiao Las Vegas crowd as Mayweather’s emphatic victory was confirmed by all three scorecards after 12 rounds of cat-and-mouse action. Mayweather comfortably outboxed his Filipino rival to snuff out any chance of the full-blooded slugfest that the more aggressive Pacquiao was hoping to ignite. He seemed to have just settled for going through the motions for the victory, according to The Manila Times columnist Conrad Cariño, writing his piece for today’s issue just minutes after the Las Vegas bout ended. “While the match was won by Mayweather based on the cards and punch stats, much of the talk years on would be possibly on how the fight failed to live up to its hype, mainly because one of the fighters looked like he was just interested in winning and collecting his huge paycheck,” he said. “Definitely, it wasn’t Pacquiao,” Carino added. The win extended Mayweather’s remarkable 19-year unbeaten record to 48-0, putting him within one fight of equalling Rocky Marciano’s legendary milestone of 49-0. READ MORE...

NO MEGABOUT: Fight won’t be remembered decades later


Floyd Mayweather Jr., hugs Manny Pacquiao after defeating Pacquiao in their welterweight unification bout at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada. AFP PHOTO 
A fight can be described as a megabout if it still creates a buzz or debate even after it was staged 20 or more years ago. This is still the case of the marquee fight between Sugar Ray Leonard and Marvin Hagler on April 1987, which Leonard won via split decision. Like the bout between Floyd Mayweather Jr. and Manny Pacquiao on Sunday, many boxing fans felt the Hagler-Leonard fight was long overdue because both fighters were no longer in their prime when they fought.  But the similarity ends there. In the Hagler-Leonard fight, the punches thrown was 792 and 629, respectively. On Sunday’s much-publicized fight, Mayweather threw 435 punches and Pacquiao 429. Although Hagler criticized Leonard for “not fighting like a man,” at least Leonard clearly landed more punches, or 306 for a 49-percent accuracy rate, while Hagler landed 291 or 37 percent. By today’s standards, the punch output of the Leonard-Hagler fight made it a real war. The fight was seen as close one, and as to who was the real winner is still being debated up to this day. While Sunday’s match was won by Mayweather based on the cards and punch stats, much of the talk years on would be possibly on how the fight failed to live up to its hype, mainly because one of the fighters looked like he was just interested in winning and collecting his huge paycheck. Definitely, it wasn’t Pacquiao. When the dust settled, Mayweather got the nod of all the three judges, with two scoring it 116-112 and one had it 118-110. When the Compubox figures came in, it was very clear Mayweather proved he was the more accurate puncher. READ MORE...

ALSO Pacquiao: ‘Still the people’s champ’


AFTER THE FALL, THE LIGHT STILL SHINES ON PACQUIAO “I thought I won,” he says as he leaves the presscon after his losing fight with Floyd Mayweather Jr. REM ZAMORA
The scorecards were read the way they should be read. And the quick-jabbing Floyd Mayweather Jr. walked off the ring the same way he got on it—still undefeated, except this time, he added a third welterweight crown to his name. But where the fight could not be quantified by numbers, where heroes are measured by heart and the blazing gusto by which they pursue their mission, a hurting Manny Pacquiao didn’t get off the ring a loser. Even the crowd agreed, giving him a stamp of roaring approval inside the MGM Grand that was supposedly the home of his pound-for-pound rival. “I thank God for this victory and appreciate everyone who came out to support us,” said the 38-year-old Mayweather, who added Pacquiao’s World Boxing Organization (WBO) crown to his World Boxing Council (WBC) and World Boxing Association (WBA) collections, his voice nearly drowned out by boos from the sellout crowd of 16,507 that thought the wrong man had won the fight. The judges, however, saw enough to settle the debate on which fighter was the greatest of his era. Dave Moretti scored it 118-110, while Glenn Feldman and Burt Clements saw it 116-112, all for the Michigan-born Mayweather, who has made this Nevada gambling oasis his home. ‘This is my era’ Mayweather’s victory allowed the brash champion to validate his claim to greatness. READ MORE...

ALSO: ‘I thought I won’ – Pacquiao


Floyd Mayweather Jr. (R), gestures after his fight against Manny Pacquiao in a welterweight unification bout on May 2, 2015 at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada. AFP PHOTO / FREDERIC J. BROWN MANILA BULLETIN PHOTO FILE. 
 A devastated Manny Pacquiao insisted he believed he had beaten Floyd Mayweather Jr. despite judges awarding a unanimous points win to his opponent in the richest fight in history on Saturday (Sunday, Philippine time) .
Pacquiao, 36, said after the Las Vegas superfight he felt he had done enough to be awarded the decision against Mayweather, who cemented his place in the pantheon of boxing greats with a defensive master class. “It was a good fight. I thought I won the fight. He didn’t do nothing. He was always moving outside. I got him many times. I saw his punches,” the Filipino boxing superstar said. But Pacquiao admitted that he had struggled to connect with the elusive Mayweather. “He was moving around too much, it wasn’t easy throwing punches at him. If he would’ve stayed in one place, then I could have thrown punches,” he said. “I was cutting him [off] and countering. I wanted to fight.”  Despite inferior height, reach and weight, Pacquiao was adamant that Mayweather’s raw power had not troubled him. “I was able to handle his power, he’s not strong like previous opponents like [Antonio] Margarito,” he said. “He’s not bigger than me. It’s not about the size. The size doesn’t matter. I’ve fought guys bigger than him and had no problem,” added Pacquiao, insisting he had not rallied late on because of a mistaken belief he was ahead. “I thought I was up in the fight, so that’s why I didn’t attack harder in the 11th and 12th rounds,” he said. AFP  THIS IS THE FULL REPORT

ALSO: Ref Bayless says fans got their money’s worth; not excited about rematch 'because of fighters' styles
[All three judges scored the last two rounds for Mayweather even if Pacquiao was clearly the aggressor.]


Referee Kenny Bayless, center, separates Floyd Mayweather Jr., left, and Manny Pacquiao, during their welterweight title fight in Las Vegas. AP
 Referee Kenny Bayless said yesterday he agreed with the judges in scoring the Fight of the Century for Floyd Mayweather Jr. over Manny Pacquiao at the MGM Grand Garden Arena here and congratulated both fighters for a competitive match that gave the fans their money’s worth. It was the eighth Pacquiao and sixth Mayweather fight that Bayless has worked. He was also the third man in the ring when Mayweather faced Oscar de la Hoya to register 2.4 million pay-per-view hits in 2007 and when Mayweather took on Saul Alvarez to record P150 Million pay-per-view revenues in 2013. Bayless said it was an honor to work a fight of this magnitude. “I’m grateful for the assignment,” he said. “I thought it was a good decision. I actually didn’t expect Mayweather to stand his ground and exchange as much as he did. I don’t think he ran that much. It was a battle between two great fighters.” As for a rematch, Bayless didn’t appear excited about the possibility. He insinuated that the outcome would likely be the same because of the fighters’ styles. That was because of the wide margin in the judges scorecards. Dave Moretti had it 118-110, Burt Clements 116-112 and Glenn Feldman 116-112, all for Mayweather. Moretti, 70, gave Pacquiao only two rounds, the fourth and sixth. Clements, 62, awarded the fourth, sixth, ninth and 10th rounds to Pacquiao while Feldman, 60, scored the same rounds for the Filipino. All three judges scored the last two rounds for Mayweather even if Pacquiao was clearly the aggressor. READ MORE...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

Floyd dances to victory


Pushed to a corner Manny Pacquiao drives Floyd Mayweather Jr. to the ropes during their “Fight of the Century” in Las Vegas on Saturday (Sunday, Philippine time). Mayweather won via unanimous decision, a verdict that broke the hearts not only of Filipinos but also of Pacquiao’s millions of fans around the world. No rematch has been talked about. AFP PHOTO

LAS VEGAS, MAY 4, 2015 (MANILA STANDARD)  Floyd Mayweather turned the ring into a dance floor on his way to a unanimous decision over a frustrated Manny Pacquiao here on Saturday (Sunday, Philippine time) to win the richest fight in history and cement his place in the pantheon of boxing greats.

Boos rang out from a pro-Pacquiao Las Vegas crowd as Mayweather’s emphatic victory was confirmed by all three scorecards after 12 rounds of cat-and-mouse action.

Mayweather comfortably outboxed his Filipino rival to snuff out any chance of the full-blooded slugfest that the more aggressive Pacquiao was hoping to ignite.

He seemed to have just settled for going through the motions for the victory, according to The Manila Times columnist Conrad Cariño, writing his piece for today’s issue just minutes after the Las Vegas bout ended.

“While the match was won by Mayweather based on the cards and punch stats, much of the talk years on would be possibly on how the fight failed to live up to its hype, mainly because one of the fighters looked like he was just interested in winning and collecting his huge paycheck,” he said.

“Definitely, it wasn’t Pacquiao,” Carino added.

The win extended Mayweather’s remarkable 19-year unbeaten record to 48-0, putting him within one fight of equalling Rocky Marciano’s legendary milestone of 49-0.

READ MORE...
The 38-year-old Mayweather retained his World Boxing Council and World Boxing Association welterweight titles and seized Pacquiao’s World Boxing Organization belt by winning the fight on all three of the judges’ scorecards.

“He’s a very awkward fighter, so I had to take my time and watch him close,” Mayweather said. “All 47 fights before I got to this fight played a major role in my career.

“Manny Pacquiao is a true champion and we both did our best tonight. When the history books are written, this fight will have been worth the wait.”

The fight is widely believed to be the most lucrative in boxing history with revenues of $400 million.

Judges emphatic Ringside judge Dave Moretti scored the bout 118-110 for Mayweather, while judges Glenn Feldman and Bert Clements both scored it 116-112 for the American.

But when the results were announced the pro-Pacquiao crowd booed lustily and tried to drown out Mayweather’s post-fight comments over the public address system.

Their Filipino star Pacquiao suffered the sixth loss of his career to go with 57 victories and two draws.

There is no denying that the 36-year-old Pacquiao made Mayweather work for the victory and hit the American with some thundering lefts.

He was the aggressor, pressing the action from the first round and was able to land some right-left combinations on Mayweather’s head, especially on the ropes and in the final seconds of the early rounds.

But ultimately Pacquiao wasn’t able to keep up his frenzied early pace for all 12 rounds and Mayweather, who was the bigger of the two fighters, managed to slip in counterpunches and hard right hands that kept the Filipino southpaw at bay.

Even so, Pacquiao said he thought he did enough to earn the victory. “I thought I won the fight,” he said. “He didn’t do nothing.” -September finale?

Mayweather reiterated afterward that he plans to retire after his next fight in September that will fulfill his six-fight contract to Showtime Sports.

“My last fight is in September. I’ll do that and I will hang it up,” said the American, who is estimated to have earned $200 million for one night’s work.

Pacquiao will receive well over $100 million in a 60-40 purse split the fighters agreed to beforehand.

The entrance of the fighters to the ring was delayed about 45 minutes because of problems with the heavy demand for pay-per-view telecast and the providers’ ability to distribute it.

Some of the biggest names in Hollywood, entertainment and sports were in attendance, including director Clint Eastwood, actors Robert De Niro, Jon Voight, Denzel Washington, Bradley Cooper, musician Sting, former NBA star Magic Johnson and talk show host Jimmy Kimmel, who visited Pacquiao in his dressing room before the fight.

Only a lucky few had tickets to the bout but thousands more milled around the outside of the Grand Garden arena and in the hotel’s casino.

Mayweather made a grand entrance befitting of his superstar status.

He was accompanied by his “The Money Team,” which includes his father/trainer Floyd Mayweather Sr.

But Pacquiao arrived first to the ring, smiling relentlessly and even taking a selfie with long-time trainer Freddie Roach during his entrance.

The atmosphere was electric inside the Grand Garden Arena as the crowd got into the fight, cheering every early exchange and urging the boxers to throw more punches.

The tension in the ring was also intense as the fighters exchanged words and even traded low blows in the third round.

Mayweather hit Pacquiao first, prompting Pacquiao to look at referee Kenny Bayless as if to say, “did you see that.”

The Filipino returned the favor when they got together on the ropes moments later.

In the fourth round Pacquiao landed his best punch of the fight so far, hitting Mayweather with an overhand right that knocked him back to the ropes.

He then added a flurry of punches for good measure as the crowd screamed like crazy for him to end the fight.

A couple of times Pacquiao had Mayweather on the ropes but the superbly-fit American took everything he could dish out and still had enough energy in the later rounds to jab, connect with some overhand rights.

He deftly moved out of harm’s way each time Pacquiao came in close for the knockout punch.

Mayweather was so confident of winning by the 12-round that he raised one arm in triumph while the two were still trading punches.

“He is a hell of a fighter. I take my hat off to him,” Mayweather said.

Mayweather threw 435 total punches compared to 429 for Pacquiao and he connected on 34 percent of those to Pacquiao’s 19 percent.

Mayweather also had his jab working in precision fashion as he landed 48 percent to Pacquiao’s 27 percent ratio. AFP


MANILA TIMES

NO MEGABOUT: Fight won’t be remembered decades later May 3, 2015 9:59 pm

A fight can be described as a megabout if it still creates a buzz or debate even after it was staged 20 or more years ago. This is still the case of the marquee fight between Sugar Ray Leonard and Marvin Hagler on April 1987, which Leonard won via split decision.

Like the bout between Floyd Mayweather Jr. and Manny Pacquiao on Sunday, many boxing fans felt the Hagler-Leonard fight was long overdue because both fighters were no longer in their prime when they fought.

But the similarity ends there.

In the Hagler-Leonard fight, the punches thrown was 792 and 629, respectively. On Sunday’s much-publicized fight, Mayweather threw 435 punches and Pacquiao 429.

Although Hagler criticized Leonard for “not fighting like a man,” at least Leonard clearly landed more punches, or 306 for a 49-percent accuracy rate, while Hagler landed 291 or 37 percent. By today’s standards, the punch output of the Leonard-Hagler fight made it a real war. The fight was seen as close one, and as to who was the real winner is still being debated up to this day.

While Sunday’s match was won by Mayweather based on the cards and punch stats, much of the talk years on would be possibly on how the fight failed to live up to its hype, mainly because one of the fighters looked like he was just interested in winning and collecting his huge paycheck. Definitely, it wasn’t Pacquiao.

When the dust settled, Mayweather got the nod of all the three judges, with two scoring it 116-112 and one had it 118-110.

When the Compubox figures came in, it was very clear Mayweather proved he was the more accurate puncher.

READ MORE...
The American connected 48 percent of his punches or 148 out of 435, while Pacquiao’s connection rate was 19 percent, or 81 of 420 punches connected. It was in the jab department that the American outclassed the Filipino, or 67 of 267 jabs landed or 25 percent. Meanwhile, Pacquiao landed 18 of his 193 jabs thrown, for a 9-percent connection rate.

In the power punches department, the American landed 81 of 168 punches for an accuracy rate of 48 percent, while Pacquiao landed 63 of 236 power punches landed or 27 percent.

Fight outcome Pacquiao tried to press the attack many times, but Mayweather found it more convenient to run away occasionally, or many times.

Pacquiao’s best moments were in round 4, where he nailed the American with two left crosses that rocked the American. And the crowd went wild when Pacquiao rocked Mayweather with his patented lefts, because a knockout or knockdown would have been possible. That never happened.

On round five, Mayweather landed at least two good counters and seemed to have regained footing.

And when Mayweather started landing his jabs, hook and right cross on Pacquiao, albeit not on big volumes from the eighth round, it was very clear the American had established control of the fight.

Pacquiao would later disclose in the post-fight press conference that he sustained a right shoulder injury, which was unfortunate.

In the post-fight interview, he said he thought he won, adding Mayweather did “nothing.”

But Mayweather at the post-fight conference also claimed he injured both of his hands, which can be viewed as realistic because as early as four weeks before the fight, rumors were circulating of him treating his hands with antiseptic.

While Mayweather’s cleverness and smarts won him Sunday’s fight, it was obvious that fans were crying for a return of fistic brutality in the ring by rooting largely for Pacquiao, whose primal and aggressive style inside the ring has endeared him to fight fans.

It just so happened that in a number of marquee bouts, the counterpuncher is willing to play the part of the spoiler not exactly to please fight fans. One good example is how counterpuncher Gene Tunney beat fan favorite Jack Dempsey twice in the early part of the 20th century.

But when it comes to making fights generate a buzz decades later, two warriors must get into the ring and trade leather like there is no tomorrow even if they are past their prime. Clearly, Hagler and Leonard showed how to do it more than 25 years ago. But Mayweather seemed to have never thought of wanting to make last Sunday’s bout much talked about decades later. That’s not good for boxing.


MANILA STANDARD

Pacquiao: ‘Still the people’s champ’ Francis T. J. Ochoa; Assistant Sports Editor @inquirerdotnet Philippine Daily Inquirer 12:45 AM| May 4th, 2015


AFTER THE FALL, THE LIGHT STILL SHINES ON PACQUIAO “I thought I won,” he says as he leaves the presscon after his losing fight with Floyd Mayweather Jr. REM ZAMORA

LAS VEGAS—The scorecards were read the way they should be read. And the quick-jabbing Floyd Mayweather Jr. walked off the ring the same way he got on it—still undefeated, except this time, he added a third welterweight crown to his name.

But where the fight could not be quantified by numbers, where heroes are measured by heart and the blazing gusto by which they pursue their mission, a hurting Manny Pacquiao didn’t get off the ring a loser.

Even the crowd agreed, giving him a stamp of roaring approval inside the MGM Grand that was supposedly the home of his pound-for-pound rival.

“I thank God for this victory and appreciate everyone who came out to support us,” said the 38-year-old Mayweather, who added Pacquiao’s World Boxing Organization (WBO) crown to his World Boxing Council (WBC) and World Boxing Association (WBA) collections, his voice nearly drowned out by boos from the sellout crowd of 16,507 that thought the wrong man had won the fight.

READ: ‘I take my hat off to Manny’ says Mayweather

The judges, however, saw enough to settle the debate on which fighter was the greatest of his era. Dave Moretti scored it 118-110, while Glenn Feldman and Burt Clements saw it 116-112, all for the Michigan-born Mayweather, who has made this Nevada gambling oasis his home.

‘This is my era’

Mayweather’s victory allowed the brash champion to validate his claim to greatness.

READ MORE...
“It’s no different with (Muhammad) Ali. He called himself the greatest,” said Mayweather (48-0), who said he got a check worth $100 million inside his locker room after the fight.

“But this is my era,” he added. “And in my era, I am TBE (the best ever).”

Crowd saw different fight

The celebrity-filled crowd, however, had Pacquiao winning all 12 rounds. Every punch thrown by the Filipino ring icon, even if it whiffed past its target, was met with a loud crescendo of cheers. The crowd egged him on and Pacquiao continued winning their hearts by doggedly chasing after an opponent too slippery to corner.

“I thought I won the fight,” Pacquiao said, and the crowd roared in agreement. “He didn’t do anything.”

From an entertainment point of view, true, Mayweather did score. Any purist would have to admire the way he methodically used his jabs to create space when Pacquiao tried to cut the ring into tight claustrophobic pockets, and launch counters when the eight-division champion missed.

And Pacquiao missed a lot.

Staying on the outside

Mayweather threw more shots, according to Compubox, 435-429, but the glaring difference was in the percentages:

Mayweather landed 148 for 34 percent while Pacquiao landed 81 for 19 percent. Pacquiao threw a lot of power punches, 236-168, but what mattered was how many connected and Mayweather struck 81 times (48 percent) to the Filipino’s 63 (27 percent).

READ: #PacMay by the numbers: Compubox stats show Floyd Mayweather threw more punches

“I did what I had to do to win this fight,” said Mayweather. “As long as I stayed on the outside, I was able to stay away (from his punches).”

And he was able to hit back at critics, who placed all the blame on him for only agreeing to this fight five years after the world had demanded it.

Injured shoulder

“You all said before that this was the guy who was going to beat me,” said Mayweather. “You all said Floyd was a coward, Floyd was scared and Floyd’s a chicken.”

“I made you eat your words.”

As it turned out, though, it wasn’t that much of a fair fight.

Pacquiao had been nursing a shoulder injury for weeks and about an hour-and-a-half before the match started, his team requested that he be allowed to take pain-numbing shots.

“No excuses, no alibis,” said the 36-year-old Pacquiao, however. “There were things that we wanted to do that we could not do because of the (pain in my) shoulder. That’s why you saw me when I tried combinations, I would back off because my shoulder hurt.”

Artful dodger

Still, there were times when Pacquiao managed to put together a semblance of an attack against the elusive Mayweather.

“(Pacquiao) had him on the ropes, we kept (Mayweather) guessing,” trainer Freddie Roach said. “But we just didn’t do enough. It was difficult to get certain punches off during the fight because his shoulder hurt.”

And, of course, there was the fact that the opponent was an artful dodger.

“I fought smart,” Mayweather said.

Little damage

Mayweather clinched, ducked and swerved away from trouble many times, especially when Pacquiao landed clean shots and looked to be setting up combinations.

At one point in the fourth round, Pacquiao drilled Mayweather with a left that backed Pretty Boy to the ropes. Pacquiao opened up with a series of power shots but Mayweather shelled-up a la Joshua Clottey, and there was little damage created. Except maybe to his reputation.

Fans inside MGM Grand’s Garden Arena booed loudly each time Mayweather turned every Pacquiao attack into a clinch and jeered in a collective amusement every time Mayweather backed out of trouble.

It sure wasn’t an awe-inspiring performance, especially from an athlete that drove the price of this superfight beyond a skyscraper’s roof.

But it effectively neutralized Pacquiao. The jabs held off Pacquiao’s vaunted combination of speed and power and his slick movement negated Pacquiao’s footwork and ability to hit from side-to-side angles.

“It was only when I stayed in the pocket that he was able to do what he wanted,” Mayweather said.

And even then, Roach, who was confident they had the game plan to hand Mayweather his first loss, admitted they could not squeeze enough out of Pacquiao’s shoulder to build on those pocket exchanges.


Manny Pacquiao and Floyd Mayweather Jr. fight night at the MGM Grand Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada. Mayweather wins by unanimous decision. PHOTO BY REM ZAMORA/INQUIRER/

Mayweather’s jabs

“We fought flat-footed too many times,” said Roach. “I asked (Pacquiao) in between rounds to throw a little more combinations.”

Pacquiao tried. But Mayweather’s jabs—and the fact that Pacman was basically overly relying on his left arm—deflated every momentum Pacquiao tried to build after landing a clean shot.

Mayweather landed 67 of 267 jabs for 25 percent, and all of them served their purpose: Keep Pacquiao from forcing Mayweather into a tight, phone-booth brawl.

Still, the rare times that Pacquiao managed to set up exchanges caught Mayweather’s attention.

“He’s a great champion and a helluva fighter,” Mayweather said. “Now I see why he’s so successful. He’s a tough competitor. He definitely had his moments in this fight.”

READ: ‘I take my hat off to Manny’ says Mayweather

Praise for Filipinos

Mayweather acknowledged this anew in the post-game press conference, saying: “I understand now why he’s so successful in boxing. To all Philippine fans, continue supporting Manny Pacquiao. He’s a tremendous warrior, he’s a great competitor and he represents the Philippines very well.”

The fight looked close through 10 rounds that it almost seemed like Pacquiao could drill a knockdown somewhere in the last two and turn the tide. Mayweather’s corner seemed to have the same impression as the American looked to press the action early in the 11th.

“My dad wanted me to do more but (Pacquiao’s) style was awkward and I had to watch out for him,” Mayweather said.

Rain of boos

After the fight, Mayweather climbed the ring corner, thumped his chest and screamed: “I knew I won, I knew I won!”

The rain of boos, though, said otherwise. Pacquiao was cheered all the way until he walked out of the ring.

The pro-Pacquiao crowd even crept into the corner strategy of the Mayweathers.

“My dad was on my ass the whole time because every time (Pacquiao) threw a punch, even when he missed, the crowd would cheer,” said Mayweather. “It had an effect on him mentally and he thought the fight was close.”

“But I knew I was ahead,” he said. “I knew in my heart that, based on the experience I have in fighting in this level, the judges weren’t going to buy the crowd screaming.”

Not good enough

Later, Pretty Boy added that he knew he had the match under control “right in the first round.”

Pacquiao was in good spirits after the match, even borrowing lines from a famous ballad to open his part of the press conference.

“I did my best,” he said. “But my best wasn’t good enough.”

And now he will be left to wonder how much more he could have given had he not dived into the fight with a painful shoulder, which he injured several weeks before the fight.

Celebrities galore

Top Rank chief Bob Arum was questioned during the presser as to why he let people pony up a huge amount of cash knowing that he was fielding an injured fighter. He said “athletes get hurt and over time, they get better and better.”

Pacquiao (57-6-2) is still guaranteed $80 million for the fight while Mayweather, despite being issued a $100-million check after the fight, is actually taking home $120 million.

Both figures are expected to jack up when the pay-per-view numbers come in. The fighters are expected to split a total purse of $300 million, with Mayweather taking a 60 percent slice of the pie.

The sellout crowd inside the arena was lined with celebrities, just as Arum had said it would be.

Jordan, other legends

Michael Jordan, the greatest basketball player of all time, was the most famous athlete that showed up.

Also present were hoop legends Magic Johnson, Charles Barkley and Reggie Miller, current Oklahoma City Thunder standout Russell Westbrook, boxing greats Mike Tyson and Evander Holyfield and tennis legend Andre Agassi.

Tinseltown’s biggest names also showed up, led by Academy Award winner Robert DeNiro, Bradley Cooper, Mark Wahlberg, Jake Gyllenhall, Claire Danes, Ben Affleck, Denzel Washington and Jamie Foxx, who sang the American national anthem before the fight.


MANILA TIMES

‘I thought I won’ – Pacquiao May 3, 2015 10:10 pm


Floyd Mayweather Jr. (R), gestures after his fight against Manny Pacquiao in a welterweight unification bout on May 2, 2015 at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada. AFP PHOTO / FREDERIC J. BROWN MANILA BULLETIN PHOTO FILE.

LAS VEGAS: A devastated Manny Pacquiao insisted he believed he had beaten Floyd Mayweather Jr. despite judges awarding a unanimous points win to his opponent in the richest fight in history on Saturday (Sunday, Philippine time) .

Pacquiao, 36, said after the Las Vegas superfight he felt he had done enough to be awarded the decision against Mayweather, who cemented his place in the pantheon of boxing greats with a defensive master class.

“It was a good fight. I thought I won the fight. He didn’t do nothing. He was always moving outside. I got him many times. I saw his punches,” the Filipino boxing superstar said.

But Pacquiao admitted that he had struggled to connect with the elusive Mayweather.

“He was moving around too much, it wasn’t easy throwing punches at him. If he would’ve stayed in one place, then I could have thrown punches,” he said.

“I was cutting him [off] and countering. I wanted to fight.”

Despite inferior height, reach and weight, Pacquiao was adamant that Mayweather’s raw power had not troubled him.

“I was able to handle his power, he’s not strong like previous opponents like [Antonio] Margarito,” he said.

“He’s not bigger than me. It’s not about the size. The size doesn’t matter.

I’ve fought guys bigger than him and had no problem,” added Pacquiao, insisting he had not rallied late on because of a mistaken belief he was ahead.

“I thought I was up in the fight, so that’s why I didn’t attack harder in the 11th and 12th rounds,” he said. AFP


PHILSTAR

Bayless says fans got their money’s worth; not excited about rematch 'because of fighters' styles By Joaquin Henson (The Philippine Star) | Updated May 4, 2015 - 12:00am


Referee Kenny Bayless, center, separates Floyd Mayweather Jr., left, and Manny Pacquiao, during their welterweight title fight in Las Vegas. AP

LAS VEGAS – Referee Kenny Bayless said yesterday he agreed with the judges in scoring the Fight of the Century for Floyd Mayweather Jr. over Manny Pacquiao at the MGM Grand Garden Arena here and congratulated both fighters for a competitive match that gave the fans their money’s worth.

It was the eighth Pacquiao and sixth Mayweather fight that Bayless has worked. He was also the third man in the ring when Mayweather faced Oscar de la Hoya to register 2.4 million pay-per-view hits in 2007 and when Mayweather took on Saul Alvarez to record P150 Million pay-per-view revenues in 2013.

Bayless said it was an honor to work a fight of this magnitude. “I’m grateful for the assignment,” he said. “I thought it was a good decision. I actually didn’t expect Mayweather to stand his ground and exchange as much as he did. I don’t think he ran that much. It was a battle between two great fighters.”

As for a rematch, Bayless didn’t appear excited about the possibility. He insinuated that the outcome would likely be the same because of the fighters’ styles. That was because of the wide margin in the judges scorecards.

Dave Moretti had it 118-110, Burt Clements 116-112 and Glenn Feldman 116-112, all for Mayweather. Moretti, 70, gave Pacquiao only two rounds, the fourth and sixth. Clements, 62, awarded the fourth, sixth, ninth and 10th rounds to Pacquiao while Feldman, 60, scored the same rounds for the Filipino. All three judges scored the last two rounds for Mayweather even if Pacquiao was clearly the aggressor.

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Although Pacquiao is supposed to be the volume puncher, he averaged only 35 blows a round, a drop of 20 from when he fought Chris Algieri last November. The startling statistic was Pacquiao connected only six punches a round on the average. Pacquiao, however, threw more power punches, 236 to 168 but Mayweather’s accuracy was higher, 48 percent to 27 percent. In terms of total punches thrown, Mayweather had the edge, 435 to 429, with a higher landing rate of 34 percent to 19 percent.

The fight stats were provided by CompuBox which tallied cumulative punches, not on a round-to-round basis. In pro boxing, the scoring is done per round and blows are not counted on a cumulative basis. CompuBox had no breakdown per round although it had averages.

It was later revealed that Pacquiao fought with an injured right shoulder that could’ve hampered his offense. He had requested to take an anti-inflammatory medicine to numb the pain before the fight but the Nevada State Athletic Commission ruled it out. Pacquiao said he injured the shoulder over two months ago and considered asking to postpone the fight. But two weeks ago, the shoulder felt better and Pacquiao said he didn’t want to disappoint the fans.

“No alibis, no excuses,” said Pacquiao. “I did my best. I thought I won. But I’ll have to review the tape to find out what exactly happened.”


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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