PHNO HEADLINE NEWS THIS PAST WEEK

WHAT 'YOLANDA LESSONS' ARE BEING DONE FOR 'RUBY' 

DEC 6 ---BRACING FOR SUPERTYPHOON President Aquino presides over a meeting of top Cabinet and government officials in Quezon City to evaluate the country’s preparedness in anticipation of Typhoon “Ruby,” which is expected to make landfall on Saturday. MALACAÑANG PHOTO BUREAU “Let’s prepare for everything,” President Benigno Aquino III told a nationally televised meeting of disaster agency chiefs on Thursday as the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) in Hawaii upgraded Typhoon “Ruby” (international name: Hagupit) into a supertyphoon. MANILA --The government is doing its best to prepare for Typhoon 'Ruby' (International name: 'Hagupit') to avoid repeating what happened when Typhoon 'Yolanda' hit the country in 2013, a Cabinet official said Friday. In an interview on radio DZMM, Interior and Local Government Secretary Mar Roxas said they have implemented changes and improvement in disaster risk reduction and management based on lessons learned from Yolanda.  READ FULL REPORT...

ALSO: Typhoon Ruby makes first landfall in Dolores, Eastern Samar—Pagasa 

DEC 6 --Typhoon Ruby (international name: Hagupit), packing winds of 175 kilometers per hour near the center and gusts of up to 210 kph, made its first landfall in the town of Dolores in Eastern Samar province on Saturday evening, the state weather bureau said. Weather forecaster Jori Loiz confirmed in a radio interview that Ruby made its landfall at 9:15 p.m. The Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (Pagasa) said that Ruby is expected to bring strong winds, storm surge of up to 4.5 meters and torrential rains. On Saturday afternoon, Pagasa raised public storm warning signal number 3 in Catanduanes, Albay including Burias Island, Sorsogon, Masbate, Ticao Island, Northern Samar, Eastern Samar, Samar, and Biliran. READ FULL REPORT...

ALSO: 500,000 evacuated as Ruby’s path widens 

DEC 6 --PHOTO: Hundreds of residents take shelter inside the provincial capitol of Surigao City on Friday in anticipation of Typhoon Ruby which is expected to hit land Saturday afternoon. AP --MANILA, Philippines—Half a million Filipinos fled their homes as differing forecasts about the path of a dangerously erratic typhoon — one predicting it will graze the capital, Manila — prompted a wide swath of the country to prepare for a weekend of destructive winds and rain. Typhoon Ruby (international name: Hagupit, which means “smash” in Filipino) was expected to hit the central Philippines late Saturday, lashing parts of a region that was devastated by last year’s Typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan) and left more than 7,300 people dead and missing. The typhoon regained strength Saturday but forecasters said it will begin rapidly weakening as it approaches land. “I’m scared,” said Yolanda survivor Jojo Moro. “I’m praying to God not to let another disaster strike us again. We haven’t recovered from the first.”  READ FULL REPORT...

(ALSO) UN: More than 30 M at risk from typhoon

DEC 5 ---PHOTO: Strong waves batter Legazpi Boulevard in Barangay Puro, Legazpi, Albay. EDD GUMBAN MANILA, Philippines - Typhoon Ruby could affect more than 30 million people in the Philippines, the United Nations has said.Denis McClean, a spokesperson for the UN Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR), said during a press briefing in Geneva on Dec. 5 that the category 5 typhoon has triggered one of the largest peacetime evacuations in Philippine history that “appeared to rival” the evacuation of one million people when Cyclone Phailin threatened India’s coastline last year. “While around 10 million residents of the Philippines are at risk of flooding, storm surges and strong winds, more than 30 million people could feel the impact,” McClean said. Typhoon Ruby (international name Hagupit) has stirred unease among many Filipinos following the devastation wrought by Super Typhoon Yolanda (international name Haiyan) in November last year. McClean said the lessons from Yolanda were being applied as local governments take the lead in disseminating early warnings. Corinne Momal-Vanian, a spokesperson for the World Food Program (WFP), said the agency was closely monitoring the typhoon’s trajectory and had food stocks available and staff on standby. READ FULL REPORT...

ALSO: Storm alert up over Metro Manila as 'Ruby' hits land  

DEC 7 ---Rainfall amount from Typhoon Ruby (international name Hagupit) from 10 p.m. to 11 p.m. MANILA, Philippines - State weather bureau PAGASA on Saturday night placed Metro Manila under public storm warning signal number one after Typhoon "Ruby" made landfall in Eastern Samar. PAGASA said that as of 10 p.m., the typhoon was heading toward Masbate. It is expected to make its second landfall in the province by Sunday afternoon. "It will be associated with strong winds, storm surge (up to 4.5 meters or 14.7 feet) and heavy to torrential rainfall," PAGASA said in its bulletin initially posted on its Facebook account. The weather bureau said the typhoon's strong wind will "bring rough to very rough sea conditions over the seaboards of Northern Luzon, eastern seaboard of Central and Southern Luzon, seaboards of Visayas and over northern and eastern seaboards of Mindanao. Fisherfolks and those using small seacraft are advised not to venture out over the said seaboards." READ FULL REPORT...

ALSO: Capiz province’s Pilar town in state of calamity 

DEC 7 --Capiz , Ruby A town in Capiz province has been placed under a state of calamity, a development that may unlock its calamity funds to help residents affected by Typhoon Ruby (Hagupit). State-run Philippine Information Agency reported Pilar town was placed under a state of calamity as of 3 p.m. Sunday. It quoted Pilar mayor Gideon Patricio as saying his town has been declared under the state of calamity Sunday afternoon. Earlier, the Department of National Defense said Masbate is now in a state of calamity. On Saturday, Camarines Sur and Albay were also placed under a state of calamity. The Office of Civil Defense in Bicol had also sought the declaration of a state of calamity for all provinces in the region due to the threat of Typhoon Ruby. OCD Region 5 head Bernardo Rafaelito Alejandro IV said this should unlock calamity funds to address the needs of residents affected by the typhoon. — Joel Locsin/LBG, GMA News THIS IS THE FULL REPORT...
Masbate now also in state of calamity due to Typhoon Ruby --- Eastern Samar starts to feel Ruby's rain, winds; evacuations continue . Masbate is now in a state of calamity, the Department of National Defense said Sunday. The DND did not give further details other than the announcement on its Twitter account. Masbate is the third Bicol province to be under a state of calamity after Camarines Sur and Albay on Saturday. The state of calamity allows access to calamity funds so they can address the needs of residents affected by Typhoon Ruby (Hagupit). On Saturday, the Office of Civil Defense in Bicol sought the declaration of a state of calamity for all provinces in the region due to the threat of Typhoon Ruby. OCD Region 5 head Bernardo Rafaelito Alejandro IV said this should unlock calamity funds to address the needs of residents affected by the typhoon. He explained that while the provinces have calamity funds, they cannot use them until there is a declaration of a state of calamity. — Joel Locsin/LBG, GMA News CONTINUE READING

Ruby crossing central PH, hits Masbate  

DEC 7 --Typhoon Ruby is expected to make its 3rd landfall over Sibuyan Island between 8 and 10pm Sunday night. Typhoon Ruby (Hagupit) made its second landfall over Cataingan, Masbate on Sunday, December 7, the state weather bureau said. In its 11am bulletin, weather agency PAGASA said the typhoon is packing maximum sustained winds of 140 km/h and gusts of up to 170 km/h. The typhoon, which is expected to move west northwest at 15 km/h, is currently located at 20 km east of Cataingan, Masbate. Ruby first hit land at Dolores, Eastern Samar on Saturday night. It is expected to make its third landfall over Sibuyan Island between 8 and 10 pm Sunday night. It will be associated with "strong winds, storm surge and heavy to torrential rainfall," the bureau said. It is expected to exit the Philippine Area of Responsibility by Wednesday, December 10.
In a briefing, National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC) chief Alexander Pama said the agency does not have validated reports on casualties either in deaths or injuries. Below is the list of areas placed under storm warning signals. READ FULL REPORT...


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS HERE:

What 'Yolanda lessons' are being done for 'Ruby'


BRACING FOR SUPERTYPHOON President Aquino presides over a meeting of top Cabinet and government officials in Quezon City to evaluate the country’s preparedness in anticipation of Typhoon “Ruby,” which is expected to make landfall on Saturday. MALACAÑANG PHOTO BUREAU “Let’s prepare for everything,” President Benigno Aquino III told a nationally televised meeting of disaster agency chiefs on Thursday as the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) in Hawaii upgraded Typhoon “Ruby” (international name: Hagupit) into a supertyphoon.

MANILA, DECEMBER 8, 2014 (ABS-CBN) By Rose Carmelle Lacuata -- The government is doing its best to prepare for Typhoon 'Ruby' (International name: 'Hagupit') to avoid repeating what happened when Typhoon 'Yolanda' hit the country in 2013, a Cabinet official said Friday.

In an interview on radio DZMM, Interior and Local Government Secretary Mar Roxas said they have implemented changes and improvement in disaster risk reduction and management based on lessons learned from Yolanda.

"Marami tayong mga leksyon na natutunan last year, at naiimplement na ngayon. Halimbawa, dito sa pulis at Bureau of Fire, last Wednesday pa lang, two days ang nakalipas, na sinabi natin, 'yung kanilang mga pamilya ay dapat ilikas na nila, ilayo na nila sa kapahamakan, dalhin na nila sa interior, nang sa ganon, ang atensyon nila, ang kaisipan nila, ay naroon sa tungkulin nila, hindi 'yung nagwo-worry sila sa pamilya nila pagdating ni Ruby. So 'yun ang isa sa malaking hakbang nang pagbabago na ginawa nila sa PNP at Bureau of Fire," Roxas added.

Together with Presidential Spokesperson Secretary Edwin Lacierda, Roxas is in Borongan, Eastern Samar, where they were tasked to send information back to Manila for immediate response and assistance.

"Ang assignment natin dito ay parang tayo ang nasa frontline na magbabato ng impormasyon sa central, para malaman kung ano ang naoobserbahan natin dito," Roxas explained.

Roxas also said the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) has also implemented some changes in terms of prepositioning of relief goods.

"Yung mga relief goods, isa ito sa mga leksyon na natutunan natin sa Yolanda, 'yung mga relief goods na naandito na, 'yung mga bigas, de lata, noodles, 'yun ay nakahanda na sa abot ng kaya ng mga lokal. Ang relief goods ng DSWD, medyo inatras ng konti sa kanilang mga safe areas. Kasi noong Yolanda, nilagay kaagad sa preposition, doon sa baybayin, eh aba'y pagdating ni Yolanda, kasama sa nasalanta, inanod. So na-wastage lahat ng libo-libong food packs na 'yun," he said.

"So isa sa mga protocol na ginagawa nina [DSWD] Sec. Dinky [Soliman] ngayon, ay kung ano ang kakayahan sa lokal, i-o-augment nila, pero yung talagang sa DSWD, ay nasa safe area, nang sa ganon, pagka lampas na ni Ruby, doon papasok, kung saan talaga kakailanganin," he added.

Borongan is one of the areas expected to get hit first by Typhoon Ruby.

As of 3 p.m. Friday, Ruby was spotted 380 kilometers east of Borongan, Eastern Samar.

It was also expected to stay on track, moving west northwest at 13 kph. It was expected to make landfall in Eastern Samar-Northern Samar area by Saturday evening.


FROM THE INQUIRER

Typhoon Ruby makes first landfall in Dolores, Eastern Samar—Pagasa Ivan Angelo de Lara
@inquirerdotnet INQUIRER.net 9:34 PM | Saturday, December 6th, 2014

MANILA, Philippines—Typhoon Ruby (international name: Hagupit), packing winds of 175 kilometers per hour near the center and gusts of up to 210 kph, made its first landfall in the town of Dolores in Eastern Samar province on Saturday evening, the state weather bureau said.

Weather forecaster Jori Loiz confirmed in a radio interview that Ruby made its landfall at 9:15 p.m.

The Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (Pagasa) said that Ruby is expected to bring strong winds, storm surge of up to 4.5 meters and torrential rains.

On Saturday afternoon, Pagasa raised public storm warning signal number 3 in Catanduanes, Albay including Burias Island, Sorsogon, Masbate, Ticao Island, Northern Samar, Eastern Samar, Samar, and Biliran.

Camarines Sur, Romblon, Aklan, Capiz, Northern Cebu including Cebu City, Bantayan Island, Leyte and Southern Leyte were placed under public storm warning signal no. 2.

Southern Quezon, Camarines Norte, Batangas, Marinduque, Oriental Mindoro, Occidental Mindoro, Antique, Iloilo, Guimaras, Northern Negros, rest of Cebu, Bohol, Surigao del Norte including Siargao Island and Dinagat Province were placed under public storm warning signal no. 1.

According to Pagasa, Ruby is expected to make landfall in the following areas between Saturday to Monday: Dolores (evening of Dec. 6), Masbate (morning of Dec. 7), Sibuyan Island (afternoon of Dec. 7), Romblon (afternoon of Dec. 7), Tablas Island (evening of Dec. 7) and Oriental Mindoro (morning of Dec. 8).


FROM THE INQUIRER

500,000 evacuated as Ruby’s path widens Associated Press 2:33 PM | Saturday, December 6th, 2014


Hundreds of residents take shelter inside the provincial capitol of Surigao City on Friday in anticipation of Typhoon Ruby which is expected to hit land Saturday afternoon. AP

MANILA, Philippines—Half a million Filipinos fled their homes as differing forecasts about the path of a dangerously erratic typhoon — one predicting it will graze the capital, Manila — prompted a wide swath of the country to prepare for a weekend of destructive winds and rain.

Typhoon Ruby (international name: Hagupit, which means “smash” in Filipino) was expected to hit the central Philippines late Saturday, lashing parts of a region that was devastated by last year’s Typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan) and left more than 7,300 people dead and missing. The typhoon regained strength Saturday but forecasters said it will begin rapidly weakening as it approaches land.

“I’m scared,” said Yolanda survivor Jojo Moro. “I’m praying to God not to let another disaster strike us again. We haven’t recovered from the first.”

The 42-year-old businessman, who lost his wife, daughter and mother last year in Tacloban City, said he stocked up on sardines, instant noodles, eggs and water.

Flights cancelled, villagers evacuated

Dozens of domestic flights were canceled and inter-island ferry services were suspended. About half a million people have been evacuated in Leyte and Samar provinces, including Tacloban, this time with little prompting from the government, said Social Welfare Secretary Dinky Soliman.

“We’ve not heard of villagers resisting to be evacuated,” regional disaster-response director Blanche Gobenciong said. “Their trauma is still so fresh.”

Television footage showed residents in Tacloban stacking sandbags to block floodwaters. One McDonald’s store also was closed and boarded up. During last year’s typhoon onslaught, most stores and supermarkets in the city were looted by residents as food ran out.

High risk

At least 47 of the country’s 81 provinces are considered potentially at high risk from Ruby, officials said. The first one in its path is Eastern Samar province, where it is expected to make landfall late Saturday. It is then expected to cut across central islands along a route northwest. But its path thereafter is debatable.

The computer models of the two agencies tracking the typhoon closely — the US military’s Joint Typhoon Warning Center in Hawaii and the Philippine weather agency — predicted different directions for the typhoon.

The US agency said Ruby may veer northwest after coming inland and sweep past the southern edge of Manila, a city of more than 12 million people. The Philippine Atmospheric Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (Pagasa) projected a more southern path. But both tracks appeared to be coming closer together as it approached land.

The typhoon strengthened again early Saturday but both agencies said it would weaken as it hits land. Pagasa said it was packing winds of 185 kilometers per hour (from 195 kph earlier) and gusts of 220 kph (from 230 kph). The US center, using one-minute average wind speed with higher readings than Pagasa’s 10-minute, said Ruby was again a super typhoon with maximum sustained winds of 240 kph and gusts of 296 kph.

Unpredictable

Gobenciong said the unpredictable path of the typhoon made it harder to ascertain which areas would be hit.

“We have a zero-casualty target,” she said. “Just one loss of life will really sadden us all and make us wonder what went wrong.”

Ruby’s erratic behavior prompted the government to call an emergency meeting of mayors of metropolitan Manila. Defense Secretary Voltaire Gazmin said he’d rather “over-prepare than under-prepare.”

Manila Mayor Joseph Estrada said that authorities have alerted residents. “We are ready,” he said, but pointed out that “these typhoons change direction all the time.”

Yolanda demolished about one million houses and displaced some four million people in the central Philippines. Hundreds of residents still living in tents in Tacloban have been prioritized in the ongoing evacuation.

Dr. Steven Godby, an expert in natural hazards at Nottingham Trent University in Nottingham, said the Philippines experiences five to 10 cyclones a year on an average, the most hitting any country.

He said the right oceanic conditions to create deadly typhoons “come together in the western Pacific and put the Philippines in the firing line as a result.”

“Isolated island groups like the Philippines are particularly vulnerable to tropical cyclones and the threats come from the high winds, storm surge and heavy rains these storms bring,” he said.


FROM PHILSTAR

UN: More than 30 M at risk from typhoon By Pia Lee-Brago (The Philippine Star) | Updated December 7, 2014 - 12:00am 1 18 googleplus0 0


Strong waves batter Legazpi Boulevard in Barangay Puro, Legazpi, Albay. EDD GUMBAN

MANILA, Philippines - Typhoon Ruby could affect more than 30 million people in the Philippines, the United Nations has said.Denis McClean, a spokesperson for the UN Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR), said during a press briefing in Geneva on Dec. 5 that the category 5 typhoon has triggered one of the largest peacetime evacuations in Philippine history that “appeared to rival” the evacuation of one million people when Cyclone Phailin threatened India’s coastline last year.

“While around 10 million residents of the Philippines are at risk of flooding, storm surges and strong winds, more than 30 million people could feel the impact,” McClean said.

Typhoon Ruby (international name Hagupit) has stirred unease among many Filipinos following the devastation wrought by Super Typhoon Yolanda (international name Haiyan) in November last year.

McClean said the lessons from Yolanda were being applied as local governments take the lead in disseminating early warnings.

Corinne Momal-Vanian, a spokesperson for the World Food Program (WFP), said the agency was closely monitoring the typhoon’s trajectory and had food stocks available and staff on standby.

The WFP, she said, has a supply of 260 metric tons of high-energy biscuits, almost 4,000 metric tons of rice and over 130 metric tons of ready-to-use supplementary food – enough to provide emergency assistance to 1.8 million people during an initial two-week period.

Christiane Berthiaume of the International Organization for Migration, said a worst-case disaster scenario would see up to 32 million people affected by the storm. She said the IOM had been assisting authorities with evacuation – particularly in areas where those displaced by Yolanda continue to live in tents.

IOM

The International Organization for Migration (IOM) in the Philippines said up to 32 million people could be affected in a worst-case scenario.

IOM has been supporting the government, particularly the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD), during evacuation across the potentially affected area, notably in regions hit by Typhoon Yolanda, where many communities are still living in tents.

“This is a worrying situation for millions of people,” said Marco Boasso, IOM’s chief of mission in the Philippines. “But we are doing all we can to prepare, getting information and emergency shelter materials to the areas most likely to be affected. We are already present on the ground and our staff will be responding from the moment the storm has passed. We have vast experience here, not just from Haiyan, but going back over 30 years.”

IOM teams in Roxas will cover the areas of Panay, Negros and Palawan; teams in Ormoc will cover Cebu, Bohol and South and Western Leyte; teams in Tacloban are focusing on Eastern Leyte and Western Samar; and teams in Guiuan on Eastern Samar. Coordination efforts are taking place in the capital, Manila.

UNICEF

The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) is in full preparedness mode to assist children and their families. Pre-positioned supplies are ready to be deployed from the UNICEF’s global warehouse in Copenhagen and local warehouses in Manila, Leyte and Cotabato. These emergency supplies include water kits, hygiene kits, water purification units, school tents, student and teacher materials, child friendly space tents, medical supplies, nutritional therapeutic food items to combat malnutrition, oral rehydration salts, tarpaulins and generators enough for at least 10,000 families.

“UNICEF is working with national and local government and partners to safeguard children and families, and ensure that they are prepared and supported. We are closely monitoring the situation and teams are in place in Tacloban City ready to respond to this new emergency,” said Lotta Sylwander, UNICEF Philippines representative.

“It is unfortunate that some of the communities recovering from last year’s massive disaster are faced again with yet another Super Typhoon. UNICEF will continue to be there by children and communities to assist them through this impending calamity.”

Oxfam aid workers

Aid workers of international humanitarian group Oxfam are on high alert, activating contingency plans and preparing stocks of emergency assistance.“Rapid assessment teams throughout the country are currently on standby, and ready to go to affected areas to determine the scale of response needed,” said Oxfam country director Justin Morgan.Morgan said they are preparing water and hygiene kits and mother-and-newborn kits that include items such as baby blankets and mats, baby clothing items and maternity napkins.He said aid workers are aware of the importance of ensuring the protection of women and girls, who are most vulnerable to the impacts of disasters.He said Oxfam is also committed to working with government and other humanitarian partners to ensure the rights of women are upheld through any emergency response, and that their needs are taken care of. –With Jose Rodel Clapano


FROM PHILSTAR

Storm alert up over Metro Manila as 'Ruby' hits land (philstar.com) | Updated December 7, 2014 - 12:00am 14 587 googleplus1 0


Rainfall amount from Typhoon Ruby (international name Hagupit) from 10 p.m. to 11 p.m.

MANILA, Philippines - State weather bureau PAGASA on Saturday night placed Metro Manila under public storm warning signal number one after Typhoon "Ruby" made landfall in Eastern Samar.

PAGASA said that as of 10 p.m., the typhoon was heading toward Masbate. It is expected to make its second landfall in the province by Sunday afternoon.

"It will be associated with strong winds, storm surge (up to 4.5 meters or 14.7 feet) and heavy to torrential rainfall," PAGASA said in its bulletin initially posted on its Facebook account.

The weather bureau said the typhoon's strong wind will "bring rough to very rough sea conditions over the seaboards of Northern Luzon, eastern seaboard of Central and Southern Luzon, seaboards of Visayas and over northern and eastern seaboards of Mindanao. Fisherfolks and those using small seacraft are advised not to venture out over the said seaboards."

It was moving west northwest at 15 kph. It is expected to exit the Philippine Area of Responsibility by Tuesday night.

More areas have been placed by PAGASA under storm warning signals.

Signal Number 3

Romblon Catanduanes Camarines Sur Albay Sorsogon Masbate including Burias and Ticao Island Northern Samar Eastern Samar Samar Leyte Biliran

PAGASA said these areas should expect:

•Heavy damage to agricultural plantation, medium and large trees maybe uprooted •Considerable damage to structure of light to medium construction, while, majority of nipa and cogon houses unroofed or destroyed •Severe damage to billboards and signages •Evacuation to a safer shelters is highly recommended •Electrical power distribution and communication services maybe severely disrupted

Residents in the mentioned provinces should also prepare for big waves associated with storm surge that may reach up to more than 14 feet, the weather bureau added.

Signal Number 2

Camarines Norte Southern Quezon Marinduque Oriental Mindoro Occidental Mindoro. Northern Antique Aklan Semirara Group of Islands Capiz Northern Iloilo, Northern Cebu including Cebu City, Bantayan and Camotes Island Southern Leyte

Signal Number 1

Pampanga Bulacan Rest of Quezon Rizal Cavite Laguna Batangas Lubang Island Calamian Group of Islands Cuyo Metro Manila Rest of Antique Rest of Iloilo Guimaras Negros Occidental Negros Oriental Rest of Cebu Bohol Surigao del Norte including Siargao Island and Dinagat Province


FROM GMA NEWS NETWORK

Capiz province’s Pilar town in state of calamity December 7, 2014 4:11pm 0 0 0 New Tags:


A satellite photo taken and released by EUMETSAT on Friday, December 5, shows Typhoon Ruby (Hagupit) closing in on Samar Island. Eastern Samar started to experience heavy rains and strong winds from Ruby Saturday morning, even as the government continued evacuation efforts for thousands of people. Many also sought shelter in churches, schools and makeshift facilities. AFP/EUMETSAT 2014

A town in Capiz province has been placed under a state of calamity, a development that may unlock its calamity funds to help residents affected by Typhoon Ruby (Hagupit).

State-run Philippine Information Agency reported Pilar town was placed under a state of calamity as of 3 p.m. Sunday.

It quoted Pilar mayor Gideon Patricio as saying his town has been declared under the state of calamity Sunday afternoon.

Earlier, the Department of National Defense said Masbate is now in a state of calamity.

On Saturday, Camarines Sur and Albay were also placed under a state of calamity.

The Office of Civil Defense in Bicol had also sought the declaration of a state of calamity for all provinces in the region due to the threat of Typhoon Ruby.

OCD Region 5 head Bernardo Rafaelito Alejandro IV said this should unlock calamity funds to address the needs of residents affected by the typhoon. — Joel Locsin/LBG, GMA News

Masbate in state of calamity due to Typhoon Ruby December 7, 2014 3:36pm 272 17 0 348 Tags: Ruby , Masbate City Eastern Samar starts to feel Rubys rain, winds; evacuations continue

Eastern Samar starts to feel Ruby's rain, winds; evacuations continue .

Masbate is now in a state of calamity, the Department of National Defense said Sunday.

The DND did not give further details other than the announcement on its Twitter account.

Masbate is the third Bicol province to be under a state of calamity after Camarines Sur and Albay on Saturday.

The state of calamity allows access to calamity funds so they can address the needs of residents affected by Typhoon Ruby (Hagupit).

On Saturday, the Office of Civil Defense in Bicol sought the declaration of a state of calamity for all provinces in the region due to the threat of Typhoon Ruby.

OCD Region 5 head Bernardo Rafaelito Alejandro IV said this should unlock calamity funds to address the needs of residents affected by the typhoon.

He explained that while the provinces have calamity funds, they cannot use them until there is a declaration of a state of calamity. — Joel Locsin/LBG, GMA News


FROM RAPPLER.COM

Ruby crossing central PH, hits Masbate (UPDATED) Published 11:54 AM, Dec 07, 2014
Updated 3:20 PM, Dec 07, 2014

Typhoon Ruby is expected to make its 3rd landfall over Sibuyan Island between 8 and 10pm Sunday night

 

Photo from NOAA Satellite and Information Service

MANILA, Philippines (UPDATED) – Typhoon Ruby (Hagupit) made its second landfall over Cataingan, Masbate on Sunday, December 7, the state weather bureau said.

In its 11am bulletin, weather agency PAGASA said the typhoon is packing maximum sustained winds of 140 km/h and gusts of up to 170 km/h.

The typhoon, which is expected to move west northwest at 15 km/h, is currently located at 20 km east of Cataingan, Masbate.

Ruby first hit land at Dolores, Eastern Samar on Saturday night. It is expected to make its third landfall over Sibuyan Island between 8 and 10 pm Sunday night.

It will be associated with "strong winds, storm surge and heavy to torrential rainfall," the bureau said.

Below is the list of areas placed under storm warning signals.

Signal Number 3

(Winds of 100-185 km/h expected in at least 18 hours)

Masbate (including Ticao and Burias Islands)
Sorsogon
Albay
Romblon
Northern Samar
Samar
Signal Number 2

(Winds of 61-100 km/h expected in at least 24 hours)

Catanduanes
Camarines Sur
Camarines Norte
Southern Quezon
Batangas including Lubang Island
Cavite
Laguna
Oriental Mindoro
Occidental Mindoro
Aklan
Capiz
Northern Cebu including Cebu City
Bantayan Island
Eastern Samar
Biliran
Leyte
Southern Leyte
Signal Number 1

(Winds of at least 30-60 km/h expected in at least 36 hours)

Rest of Quezon
Rizal
Pampanga
Bulacan
Nueva Ecija
Zambales
Bataan
Northern Palawan
Metro Manila
Antique
Iloilo
Rest of Cebu
Bohol
Dinagat Province
Siargao Island

Areas within Ruby's 500-kilometer diameter can expect heavy to torrential rain (10 to greater than 30 mm/h), the bureau said.

By Monday morning, December 8, the storm is forecast to be 20 km southwest of Calapan City, or 150 km south of Science Garden, Quezon City.

It is expected to exit the Philippine Area of Responsibility by Wednesday, December 10.

In a briefing, National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC) chief Alexander Pama said the agency does not have validated reports on casualties either in deaths or injuries.

A total of 146,875 families or 716,639 persons from Regions IV-A, IV-B, 5, 6, 7, 8, and CARAGA have been evacuated, Pama added.

Ruby is expected to exit the Philippine area of responsibility on Wednesday morning, December 10.

PAGASA will release its next bulletin at 5 pm on Sunday.

More misery

Typhoon Ruby tore apart homes and sent waves crashing through coastal communities across the eastern and central Philippines, creating more misery for millions following a barrage of deadly disasters.

The wind strength at landfall made Ruby the most powerful storm to hit the Philippines this year, exceeding a typhoon in July that killed more than 100 people.

"Many houses, especially in the coastal areas, were blown away by strong winds," Stephanie Uy-Tan, the mayor of Catbalogan City, told Agence France-Presse by phone on Sunday morning.

"Trees and power lines were toppled, tin roofs were blown off and there is flooding."

Fearful of a repeat of last year when Super Typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan) claimed more than 7,350 lives, the government undertook a massive evacuation effort ahead of Ruby that saw millions of people seek shelter.

However Ruby is forecast to take 3 days to cut across the Philippines, passing over mostly poor central regions, and authorities were still bracing for worst-case scenarios.

The government warned of storm surges up to 5 meters (16 feet) high in some areas, flash flooding, landslides and winds strong enough to tear apart even sturdy homes.

Tens of millions of people live in the typhoon's path, including those in the central Philippines who are still struggling to recover from the devastation of Yolanda, which hit 13 months ago.

In Tacloban, one of the cities worst-hit by Yolanda, palm-thatch temporary houses built by aid agencies for survivors of last year's typhoon had been torn apart, Vice Mayor Jerry Yaokasin told Agence France-Presse.

'Better prepared'

However there was no repeat of the storm surges that did the most damage during Yolanda.

"There is a collective sigh of relief. The initial assessment is that there are no casualties. We were better prepared after Yolanda, up to 50,000 people were packed in evacuation centres," Yaokasin said.

"But the transitional shelters made of nipa (palm thatch) were blown away. Our biggest challenge is how to provide for those who were displaced because of that," he said.

In Bicol, hundreds of thousands of people were huddling in schools, churches and other official evacuation centers.

In Legazpi City, ocean sprays more than one meter high crashed above the city’s seawall and fierce winds roared on Sunday morning, ahead of the main typhoon front. – With reports from Agence France-Presse/Rappler.com


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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