NOY TO CONGRESS: GIVE ME EMERGENCY POWERS

SEPT 17 --PHOTO: President Aquino is greeted by European Council President
Herman Van Rompuy
- President Aquino has formally asked Congress for emergency powers that would enable him to address the projected electricity shortage next year. Aquino made the request in a letter to Speaker Feliciano Belmonte Jr., a copy of which was furnished Senate President Franklin Drilon. However, Drilon said it was impossible for the Senate to come up with the joint resolution by the end of September since Congress has only four plenary sessions left before it adjourns for a three-week break. “We don’t even have the draft joint resolution. We don’t know the parameters of the authority being requested. We know the urgency, but we can’t rush into this,” he said.

The letter-request, dated Sept. 12, was included in the House order of business yesterday and sent to the rules committee chaired by Majority Leader Neptali Gonzales II. “In accordance with Section 71 of Republic Act 9136, otherwise known as the Electric Power Industry Reform Act of 2001, I hereby seek the immediate enactment of a joint resolution authorizing the President to establish additional generating capacity,” Aquino said in his request. He informed Belmonte and Drilon that the Department of Energy predicts a “critical electricity situation” in the summer of 2015 due to, among other factors, the expected effects of the El Niño phenomenon and delays in the start of operation of “committed power projects.” “There is no gainsaying that the imminent electric power shortage during these months is a real threat to the country’s growing economy and the general welfare of the people.

“The speedy enactment of the joint resolution will ensure the energy requirements of the country for this critical period – through a specific, focused and targeted acquisition of additional generating capacities for use during the limited periods of time of very tight energy supply,” the President said. “This authority is needed in order to address the imminent shortage of electric power for the summer of 2015 in Luzon. I look forward to a favorable response from both houses (of Congress),” he added. Gonzales said they are reviewing the draft bill before referring it to the committee on energy. “We will attend to the President’s request with dispatch,” he said. Cannot be rushed --Drilon said the Senate would work on the measure “as fast as we can,” but could not be rushed to approve it. “I think the committee on energy chaired by Senator (Sergio) Osmeña will meet on Wednesday next week.

Given all the complicated issues, we cannot rush into this but we know the urgency. We will work on this,” he said. During the hearing on the proposed 2015 budget of the DOE yesterday, Drilon said the President’s letter was too “broad” and did not contain the parameters for the authority being requested from Congress. Osmeña also echoed Drilon’s statement that the authority could not be granted to the President by the end of the month. “I’ve been telling them we’ll have a shortage since 2011 and then now this is going to be my fault? It’s not accurate for them to depend on Senate approval before the end of September,” he said. He said the Senate has a duty to protect the people from the possible adverse impacts of the grant of emergency powers to the President. *READ MORE...

ALSO: ‘Extra powers will not solve energy shortage’ -House Leaders 

SEPT 19 --GRANTING emergency powers to President Benigno Aquino 3rd will not solve a looming energy
shortage, House leaders said on Wednesday as convenors of a consumer group warned that granting the President extra powers is “dangerous.” House Majority Leader Neptali Gonzales 2nd of Mandaluyong City (Metro Manila) and Rep. Reynaldo Umali of Oriental Mindoro noted that there are other ways to address the power crisis that could hit the country next year.
The President on Monday asked Congress to grant him emergency powers to act on power problems that officials said could be felt by March or April next year.

“Aside from emergency powers, there are other provisions of the Epira law that can address this. provisions of the Epira law that can address this. Has the Department of Energy [DoE] conducted inspections of power plants and told its owners that at no point in the three-month period next year should they conduct maintenance work because there is a greater demand for power supply? As for the ERC [Energy Regulatory Commission], are they doing their job which is to look if there is cartel of power supply and impose penalty on those liable if there [is] such [cartel]?” Gonzales said. “There are a lot of provisions under the Epira that should have been done but unfortunately, were not done. That is their mandate. The grant of emergency powers is not the solution. It could be a part of the solution, but even without it, the DOE and ERC have the capacity to address the situation,” he added.

Epira is the Electric Power Industry Reform Act. The President wants Congress to grant him emergency powers through a joint resolution so that the government can enter into contract agreements with power generators.
Under Epira, the government is banned from entering into contracts with power producers unless both Houses of
Congress grant the President emergency powers to do so. “The mandate of the DOE is to plan for five to 10 years. What has been the plan of the DOE since Secretary [Jericho] Petilla took over? Why is it that the emergency was only discovered right now when it could have been anticipated two years ago?” Gonzales asked.  *READ FURTHER...

ALSO: House cool to emergency powers for Noy  

President Aquino’s request for emergency powers to deal with a projected electricity shortage in Luzon in mid-2015 faces rough sailing in the House of Representatives, Majority Leader Neptali Gonzales II said yesterday. “We will subject this proposal to a fine-tooth-comb scrutiny. We have to make sure that there is really credible basis for the grant of the special authority that the President is seeking,” he told reporters. He said the administration is in a no-win situation in addressing the projected shortfall in power supply. “If we are making people pay for additional electricity and the alleged shortage does not happen, we in Congress and the President will be blamed. If it happens, just the same, the President will be blamed,” he said.

Gonzales pointed out that instead of making people pay billions for additional power, the Department of Energy (DOE) should explore other options to deal with the projected shortage. He said he and Speaker Feliciano Belmonte Jr. have been informed that requiring malls and other big business establishments to use their generators in exchange for some incentives would free up about 1,000 megawatts (MW) that would be available to household users during next year’s summer months. “Aside from this, we were told that there is an additional 125 MW that Petron Corp. can provide, plus 100 MW more from a natural gas plant that is scheduled to start operating before yearend. We can also resort to energy conservation measures,” he said. “Clearly, there are alternatives other than making consumers pay billions,” he said. *READ MORE...

ALSO: EU, PH back peaceful resolution of sea row 

SEPT 17 --Dispute should be settled by int’l arbitration. PHOTO: European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso, right, and Philippine President Benigno Aquino III address the media at the European Commission headquarters in Brussels, Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. They discussed the Mindanao Peace negotiations, trade and investment, bilateral development cooperation and maritime issues. --BRUSSELS—The Philippines and the European Union (EU) agree that territorial disputes in the South China Sea should be resolved through international arbitration.

This was made clear when President Aquino sat down on Monday with European Commission President José Manuel Barroso at the EC headquarters in the Berlaymont building here, as both leaders emphasized the need to settle differences between China and its neighbors peacefully. With both the Philippines and the EU seeking the same route, Aquino said “China will have to listen,” noting that the EU is its “biggest trading partner.” Beijing, which is claiming around 90 percent of the South China Sea, has rejected international arbitration, insisting that disputes should be resolved bilaterally with individual claimants like the Philippines. “Let me stress that the European Union encourages all parties to seek peaceful solutions, through dialogue and cooperation, in accordance with international law—in particular with the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea [Unclos],” Barroso said in a joint press conference with Aquino at the EC headquarters.

The European Union, he said, is a “proud” party to the 1976 Treaty of Amity and Cooperation in Southeast Asia, which seeks to “promote perpetual peace, everlasting amity and cooperation” in the region. Triple Action Plan --“We recall its fundamental principles, namely to settle differences by peaceful means, to renounce the threat or use of force and to effectively cooperate among partners,” Barroso said. The Triple Action Plan being pushed by Manila was not mentioned in the press conference. But the EU position expressed by Barroso is apparently aligned with the Philippine proposal. *READ MORE...

ALSO: Settle sea row peacefully – EU  

SEPT 17 --European Commission President José Manuel Barroso issued the call following a meeting with President Aquino last Monday. PHOTO: ROYAL WELCOME – King Philippe of Belgium (right) welcomes President Aquino at the Royal Palace in Brussels Monday. Aquino is on an official visit to Belgium. (AFP) “Let me stress that the European Union encourages all parties to seek peaceful solutions, through dialogue and cooperation, in accordance with international law – in particular with the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea,” Barroso said in a joint press conference with Aquino at the EC headquarters in Brussels. Belgium echoed EU’s call for a peaceful resolution to the territorial conflict. President Aquino thanked Belgian Prime Minister Elio Di Rupo for the support during their meeting at the Prime Minister’s office-residence in Brussels.

In his meeting with the Belgian prime minister, President Aquino shared the country’s Triple Action Plan in addressing the concerns in the South China Sea; the Philippines’ calls for the full and effective implementation of the ASEAN-China Declaration on the Conduct of Parties in the South China Sea (DOC); the expeditious conclusion of a legally-binding Code of Conduct (COC); and for the implementation of a settlement mechanism that will bring the disputes to a final solution grounded on international law, particularly the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS). RENOUNCE USE OF FORCE --“The European Union is proud to be a party of the Treaty of Amity and Cooperation, and we recall its fundamental principles, namely to settle differences by peaceful means, to renounce the threat or use of force and to effectively cooperate among partners,” Barroso added.

Aquino, who arrived in Brussels last Monday for a two-day working visit, earlier lobbied for EU support to the country’s position to resolve the territorial conflict with China through the arbitration process. With the latest EU pronouncement on the maritime dispute, President Aquino is crossing his fingers that China, which has been criticized for its aggressive claims in the disputed territory, would heed to the appeal of the European bloc. “China’s growth is dependent on trade. And the European Union in particular is very conscious of so many parameters with regards to who they will trade with,” the President said in a media interview on board his flight from Madrid to Brussels last Monday. “China will have to listen because the European Union is, I think, the biggest trading partner of China,” he added. *READ MORE...

FROM THE TRIBUNE

ALSO: RP ‘quasi-rogue’ state — Chinese media 

SEPT 18 --China’s state-controlled media have turned up the heat on President Aquino, branding the Philippines in an editorial as a “quasi-rogue” state even as it demanded a public apology from Malacañang over “the serial attacks on Chinese citizens” in the country.
The Tuesday opinion in the English-language newspaper The Global Times which usually serves as the voice of the regime, is one of a series of attacks against Manila following the abductions of three Chinese citizens in the Philippines in a span of five days and the alleged plan to attack the Chinese Embassy in Manila by a self-styled anti-China group.

It also recalled the 2010 Luneta hostage crisis when eight Hong Kong citizens died. “Poor social governance, an anti-China sentiment, and a Western-style democratic system where nationalism can foment wantonly make the Philippines a quasi-rogue state,” it noted. Beijing has warned its citizens not to travel to the Philippines and reminded Chinese citizens in the country to take precautions. “We demand that Philippine President Benigno Aquino III makes a public apology for the serial attacks on Chinese citizens and severely reprimands the criminals, which may add to our confidence in the Philippine government ensuring the safety of Chinese citizens.”

Also, the editorial called on the government to take action to crack down on provocations emanating from the extreme anti-China sentiment. Global Times cited the recent incident where a Chinese citizen sustained life-threatening injuries after being shot in Bulacan province and the abduction of two Chinese on Sept. 8 and 11.
“Although the Philippines is suffering from a deteriorating security situation, the spate of incidents targeting the Chinese over the past week inevitably prompts the public to connect them to the escalation in tension between Beijing and Manila,” it said. *READ MORE...

(ALSO) Marcos: Philippines must sit down with China to end sea dispute  

SEPT 17 --PHOTO: Sen. Ferdinand Marcos Jr. gestures during the Kapihan sa Senado forum in June. Senate PRIB/Cesar Tomambo. MANILA, Philippines - The Philippines should pursue the bilateral negotiations proposed by China to solve the West Philippine Sea dispute, Sen. Ferdinand Marcos Jr. said. In an interview with ANC's Beyond Politics, Marcos said the maritime row will not be settled with finality if the two countries do not sign an agreement on the issue. "Hindi magkakaroon ng agreement na iyan kung hindi natin kinakausap ang China. China has already made very clear that this adjudication process that's being undertaken right now is not one that they will honor," Marcos told program host Lynda Jumilla.

Marcos said it is time for the Philippines to sit down with China. "In the end of the day, it will have to be China and the Philippines sitting down at the table signing an agreement to put an end to all these tensions and all of these difficulties that we are having over the conflicting claims in the West Philippine Sea," the senator said. Lawyer Harry Roque Jr., an international law expert, also believes that the Philippines should consider bilateral talks since the country is obliged to resort to all peaceful means as a signatory of the United Nations charter. "If I were him (President Aquino), I will still do it behind closed doors," Roque said in a past interview. "We should be exhausting all means for peaceful resolution of this dispute." Presidential Spokesperson Edwin Lacierda has said that the country cannot have bilateral discussions with China because the sea dispute involves more than two parties. The Philippines is pursuing a Triple Action Plan (TAP) aimed to reduce and manage maritime tensions. *READ MORE...

ALSO: Aquino confronted on human rights record in Belgium forum  

SEPT 17 --President Benigno Aquino III was put on the spot over his administration’s human rights
record shortly after he delivered a wide-ranging policy speech organized by an independent think tank here. Shortly after four protesters from Migrante Europe greeted his convoy at the entrance of Château of Val-Duchesse on Tuesday (Wednesday, Manila time), Aquino rejected what he called “blanket statements” detailing how “human rights violations had not stopped” since he took office four years ago.

During the open forum that followed Aquino’s speech, one participant also mentioned the government’s revised counterinsurgency program, Oplan Bayanihan, saying it appeared to “endanger” the lives of some of his own people. “Well, those are blanket statements and we don’t necessarily agree with them,” he told his audience in a forum organized by the Egmont Institute. “It is not our policy to encourage or even abet any transgressions of the law. And towards that end, we have been investigating all of these allegations,” he added, citing also the arrest of former Major Gen. Jovito Palparan, who is facing criminal charges over the disappearance of two student activists. “We have adopted a policy that their only deterrence to crime is the certainty of punishment.”

*READ MORE


READ FULL REPORT HERE:

Noy to Congress: Give me emergency powers


President Aquino is greeted by European Council President Herman Van Rompuy

MANILA
, SEPTEMBER 22, 2014 (PHILSTAR) By Jess Diaz (The Philippine Star) | Updated September 17, 2014 - 1:00am 1 1 googleplus0 0 - President Aquino has formally asked Congress for emergency powers that would enable him to address the projected electricity shortage next year.

Aquino made the request in a letter to Speaker Feliciano Belmonte Jr., a copy of which was furnished Senate President Franklin Drilon.

However, Drilon said it was impossible for the Senate to come up with the joint resolution by the end of September since Congress has only four plenary sessions left before it adjourns for a three-week break.

“We don’t even have the draft joint resolution. We don’t know the parameters of the authority being requested. We know the urgency, but we can’t rush into this,” he said.

The letter-request, dated Sept. 12, was included in the House order of business yesterday and sent to the rules committee chaired by Majority Leader Neptali Gonzales II.

“In accordance with Section 71 of Republic Act 9136, otherwise known as the Electric Power Industry Reform Act of 2001, I hereby seek the immediate enactment of a joint resolution authorizing the President to establish additional generating capacity,” Aquino said in his request.

He informed Belmonte and Drilon that the Department of Energy predicts a “critical electricity situation” in the summer of 2015 due to, among other factors, the expected effects of the El Niño phenomenon and delays in the start of operation of “committed power projects.”

“There is no gainsaying that the imminent electric power shortage during these months is a real threat to the country’s growing economy and the general welfare of the people.

“The speedy enactment of the joint resolution will ensure the energy requirements of the country for this critical period – through a specific, focused and targeted acquisition of additional generating capacities for use during the limited periods of time of very tight energy supply,” the President said.

“This authority is needed in order to address the imminent shortage of electric power for the summer of 2015 in Luzon. I look forward to a favorable response from both houses (of Congress),” he added.

Gonzales said they are reviewing the draft bill before referring it to the committee on energy. “We will attend to the President’s request with dispatch,” he said.

Cannot be rushed

Drilon said the Senate would work on the measure “as fast as we can,” but could not be rushed to approve it.

“I think the committee on energy chaired by Senator (Sergio) Osmeña will meet on Wednesday next week. Given all the complicated issues, we cannot rush into this but we know the urgency. We will work on this,” he said.

During the hearing on the proposed 2015 budget of the DOE yesterday, Drilon said the President’s letter was too “broad” and did not contain the parameters for the authority being requested from Congress.

Osmeña also echoed Drilon’s statement that the authority could not be granted to the President by the end of the month.

“I’ve been telling them we’ll have a shortage since 2011 and then now this is going to be my fault? It’s not accurate for them to depend on Senate approval before the end of September,” he said.

He said the Senate has a duty to protect the people from the possible adverse impacts of the grant of emergency powers to the President.

* He cited the experience during the Ramos administration when several independent power producers were contracted to address the power crisis with a take or pay guarantee. This led to an overcapacity and the National Power Corp. accumulating a massive debt.

Cost to taxpayers

Sen. Francis Escudero said he wants to find out how much the government would incur and its cost to taxpayers.

“What’s the cost to taxpayers of this measure? Even if power contracted by the government will eventually be sold to distributors, and thus the acquisition cost will be recouped, we still would like to know the costs involved,” said Escudero, chairman of the Senate finance committee.

“How will it be financed? Even if it’s an off-budget transaction, the government has the duty to publicly disclose the details,” he added.

Only solution

Energy Secretary Carlos Jericho Petilla said he had raised the issue since July and would continue to push for the establishment of additional generation capacity as “the only solution… at this point.”

While there are other solutions for the expected power shortage next summer, he said there are no guarantees that these would materialize, and might even be more expensive.

Among the options is the Interruptible Load Program (ILP), which involves distribution utilities such as the Manila Electric Co. and electric cooperatives asking their big load customers to address their power requirements by using their own generator sets.

Petilla said private sector response to the ILP has been “dismal” and there is no guarantee it would materialize and address the power shortage.

He said the old Malaya geothermal power plant in Rizal, also among the options, has to be rehabilitated to be utilized.

Given the uncertainties with the other options, Petilla said contracting with power suppliers is presently the only real solution.

Suppliers’ requirement

He said the end-September deadline for the contracting of additional power was based on the requirement of the suppliers of a six-month period to be able to guarantee the necessary load.

“It’s absolute as far as the supplier is concerned,” he said.

With Congress saying that it cannot come out with the joint resolution this month, Petilla said he could settle for a supplier who could provide power requirements of the country in three months.

“But it will be expensive… I don’t think there is anybody who can supply in three months,” he said.

“There are alternatives but the question is, are we willing to pay for it. There are many alternatives, but our problem is time and cost constraints. What we have to consider is if we’re willing to have brownouts. It all depends on what we want,” he added.

Go slow

Militant party-list representatives and other members of the House minority bloc, however, cautioned Congress to go slow in the grant of emergency powers to avoid the anomalies that took place during the Ramos administration.

“We should not commit those mistakes again, like entering into a take-or-pay arrangement, which allows an investor to be fully paid for his generating capacity, whether that is used or not. We should pity the consumer, who will ultimately pay for our mistakes,” Isabela Rep. Rodolfo Albano III, a member of the minority, said.

He said Congress should impose strict parameters for the exercise of emergency powers.

He said Petilla should tell lawmakers his agency’s plans to increase generating capacity in Luzon for the middle of next year.

“Are they buying generators or are they renting? What do they exactly want to do? What are the details? Secretary Petilla should tell us because he will be the one who will be in charge of implementation. As of now, we are groping in the dark, we are guessing. ” he said.

Albano said Petilla should also verify his department’s data on “generating capacity, dependable capacity and demand” to clear up confusion.

“If his own figures for 2013 were to be believed, we even have excess electricity available in Luzon,” he said.

He cited the figures released by his minority colleague, Bayan Muna Rep. Neri Colmenares, and supplied by the DOE, that installed capacity for the Luzon grid is 12,790 megawatts, while dependable capacity is 11,469 MW.

The peak demand for the grid is just 8,700 MW, with Meralco using 6,121 MW.

“If these figures are correct, we will have enough electricity in Luzon next year, when a shortage is projected. Unless they are wrong,” Albano said.

TUCP backs bill

The Trade Union Congress of the Philippines (TUCP) expressed support for the grant of emergency powers for the President, but said he must also ensure that it will not lead to power rate hikes.

“We insist that the Department of Energy now present their tariff simulations and cost-impact scenarios to the public so we will know what to do,” TUCP executive director Luis Corral said.

The TUCP said the DOE’s proposals, such as gas turbines and diesel-powered generation sets, could lead to higher power rates.

“We have already advised DOE to do tariff simulations first because the power crisis cannot just be defined as a lack of power supply, it is also about uncompetitive power rates,” the DOE said in a statement.

“It is the consumers who are being punished for the failure to inspect defective meters in 125 distribution utilities by the ERC. And now the power industry wants to add to their profit by creating a power shortage which will allow them to charge more,” the TUCP statement added.

Doable plans

Militant labor group Partido ng Manggagawa (PM) called on Congress to ask the President to present doable plans to solve the looming power crisis before granting him emergency powers.

PM spokesman Wilson Fortaleza warned that palliative solutions to the power crisis would only bring more problems.

He said the Aquino government should be blamed for the power crisis for doing nothing since warnings were raised as early as 2010.

Fortaleza said lawmakers should also declare the EPIRA and privatization a failure and audit all the plants’ capacities before granting emergency powers to the President. – With Mayen Jaymalin, Marvin Sy, Artemio Dumlao

FROM THE MANILA TIMES

‘Extra powers will not solve energy shortage’ September 17, 2014 10:38 pm
by JOEL M. SY EGCO SENIOR REPORTER AND LLANESCA T. PANTI REPORTER

GRANTING emergency powers to President Benigno Aquino 3rd will not solve a looming energy shortage, House leaders said on Wednesday as convenors of a consumer group warned that granting the President extra powers is “dangerous.”

House Majority Leader Neptali Gonzales 2nd of Mandaluyong City (Metro Manila) and Rep. Reynaldo Umali of Oriental Mindoro noted that there are other ways to address the power crisis that could hit the country next year.

The President on Monday asked Congress to grant him emergency powers to act on power problems that officials said could be felt by March or April next year.

“Aside from emergency powers, there are other provisions of the Epira law that can address this. provisions of the Epira law that can address this. Has the Department of Energy [DoE] conducted inspections of power plants and told its owners that at no point in the three-month period next year should they conduct maintenance work because there is a greater demand for power supply? As for the ERC [Energy Regulatory Commission], are they doing their job which is to look if there is cartel of power supply and impose penalty on those liable if there [is] such [cartel]?” Gonzales said.

“There are a lot of provisions under the Epira that should have been done but unfortunately, were not done. That is their mandate. The grant of emergency powers is not the solution. It could be a part of the solution, but even without it, the DOE and ERC have the capacity to address the situation,” he added.

Epira is the Electric Power Industry Reform Act.

The President wants Congress to grant him emergency powers through a joint resolution so that the government can enter into contract agreements with power generators.

Under Epira, the government is banned from entering into contracts with power producers unless both Houses of Congress grant the President emergency powers to do so.

“The mandate of the DOE is to plan for five to 10 years. What has been the plan of the DOE since Secretary [Jericho] Petilla took over? Why is it that the emergency was only discovered right now when it could have been anticipated two years ago?” Gonzales asked.

* The lawmaker admitted that he was baffled by Petilla’s statement that P6 billion would be needed to contract power producers by the end of October this year to ensure that there will be no power outages from March to May next year.
“How do you justify a rental free of P6 billion that would only ensure power supply for three months next year? Is it right for us to pay P6 billion when we only need additional generating power in three months? That cost is quite high,” Gonzales said.

“I have talked to Congressman Umali and we have a common understanding that whatever that nature of that emergency power would be, it should not result as an additional burden of the consumers,” he added.

Umali heads the House energy committee.

He and Gonzales are members of the ruling Liberal Party.

Instead of pressing Congress for emergency powers, Gonzales noted that the Energy department should just focus on accessing the consolidated power supply of private generating power plants such as malls, which would already be good for 1,000 megawatts.

“We don’t want the government to hastily provide fund, even if it is coming from Malampaya fund, because there are other existing resources available,” he said.

Blanket powers

Former Bayan Muna Rep. Teodoro Casino, a convenor of the People Opposed to Unwarranted Electricity Rates (Power), said granting additional powers to the President is dangerous because such powers can be abused.

“Blanket powers for Aquino are dangerous. The emergency powers being requested by President Aquino from Congress to solve the projected energy shortfall appears vague, all-encompassing and therefore prone to abuse and corruption,” Casino warned.

Bagong Alyansang Makabayan (Bayan) secretary general Renato Reyes Jr. agreed, noting that the request sent by Aquino to leaders of Congress lacked details, particularly how the emergency powers will be dispensed with.

“We are perplexed why the President did not even indicate the amount of additional capacity to be contracted out, how it will be acquired, the expected cost to taxpayers and consumers, nor the period involved. Without these things, there can be no intelligent debate on their proposal,” Casiño said.

“It’s as if the President wants blanket powers even more than what Congress gave then-President Fidel V. Ramos before,” he added.

Once given, Aquino’s emergency powers may authorize him to negotiate with private contractors and enter into onerous supply contracts.

This, Casino explained, may push up electricity rates to extreme levels.

But Palace spokesman Edwin Lacierda said parameters of the requested emergency powers will be given by Energy Secretary Jericho Petilla when he meets with leaders of the Senate and House of Representatives.

“The details will have to be filled up by Secretary Petilla. In fact, Sen. Franklin Drilon was asking [what are the parameters] of these emergency powers. So that will have to be discussed by the Department of Energy with both the House and the Senate,” Lacierda told a news briefing also on Wednesday.

He explained that it is Petilla’s job to determine contents of the joint resolution that will authorize the grant of additional powers for the President.

As the point man in dealing with problems pertaining to power, Petilla will weigh the “slew of options available,” Lacierda said.

He allayed fears that the situation may cause a repeat of the power crisis during Ramos’ time, when the government lost huge amounts of money to pay for exorbitant electric fees from various producers.

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6 Responses to ‘Extra powers will not solve energy shortage’
nido says:
September 18, 2014 at 8:49 am
some sitting commissioners & top level positions in DOE are might working behind those who appointed them; Plague by past 3 regimes is not easy task to cleanse; some key solutions might be blocked by civil service regulations. These bylaws program for good intention will go bad once penetrated by virus thieves…as we upgrade virus protection program bylaws, some are embedded be difficult to remove.
Reply

vg says:
September 18, 2014 at 8:37 am
My analysis of giving emergency powers to Aquino is dangerous and not needed. It would be the same as giving your 6 year old a gun to play with because he is having a tantrum. Nothing good will happen and many bad things could happen.
Reply

revitor says:
September 18, 2014 at 7:13 am
I believe, EPIRA should be thoroughly reviewed and strategic amendments should be made. Cyclical power supply deficits signify that the law is ineffective on its purpose. Power generation should not be solely treated as profitable business endeavor where private entities surely will exploit at the expense of the consumers. Primarily, its a social responsibily of any government, much more a poor country like the Philippines, to address. As observed, EPIRA is being used by the country’s oligarchs to make more money through putting up power plants instead of industrial plants to generate more employment. Operating a high-tech and modern power plant needs only few technicians and engineers. Naturally, these oligarchs are more interested on this type of business since the margin of profit is much more big. Profit per employee is therefore very big compared to an ordinary business endeavor. With the country’s few capitalists diverting their investable money to power generation, no wonder our employment woe has worsened. In effect, our economic development will forever be a pipe dream.
Reply

Bobski Natividad says:
September 18, 2014 at 6:12 am
This guy Patilla was appointed by Pnoy to do wonders on energy issues, how come he is throwing back his responsibilities to Pnoy? Is he not the right man for the job? Why is there in need for emergency powers to solve the problem? Another hidden agenda from one of the bright boys?
Reply

upnngrad says:
September 18, 2014 at 4:41 am
“Extra powers” enables Malakanyang (meaning Persi-Noy) to sign contracts (most likely to his KKK’s and the KKK-recommendations) with less oversight from Kongreso-Pilipinas.
Reply

Inocent says:
September 18, 2014 at 12:54 am
PNoy and his team have been sleeping on their jobs or simply lazy. They never addressed this problem other than blaming the Arroyo administration 4 years passing. Now that the mischievous one is backed in the corner, he does not fire his incompetent energy secretary and conveniently protect and spare him but low and behold, he now wants extra powers to address it. I agree, PNoy cannot and will not be able to solve the energy problem, firstly because he does not know how and secondly he will just allow purchase expensive energy cost from his oligarchs which will only make the cost of energy more expensive to the licking of his oligarch-financiers.

FROM PHILSTAR

House cool to emergency powers for Noy By Jess Diaz (The Philippine Star) | Updated September 19, 2014 - 12:00am 1 0 googleplus0 0


AQUINO

MANILA, Philippines - President Aquino’s request for emergency powers to deal with a projected electricity shortage in Luzon in mid-2015 faces rough sailing in the House of Representatives, Majority Leader Neptali Gonzales II said yesterday.

“We will subject this proposal to a fine-tooth-comb scrutiny. We have to make sure that there is really credible basis for the grant of the special authority that the President is seeking,” he told reporters.

He said the administration is in a no-win situation in addressing the projected shortfall in power supply.

“If we are making people pay for additional electricity and the alleged shortage does not happen, we in Congress and the President will be blamed. If it happens, just the same, the President will be blamed,” he said.

Gonzales pointed out that instead of making people pay billions for additional power, the Department of Energy (DOE) should explore other options to deal with the projected shortage.

He said he and Speaker Feliciano Belmonte Jr. have been informed that requiring malls and other big business establishments to use their generators in exchange for some incentives would free up about 1,000 megawatts (MW) that would be available to household users during next year’s summer months.

“Aside from this, we were told that there is an additional 125 MW that Petron Corp. can provide, plus 100 MW more from a natural gas plant that is scheduled to start operating before yearend. We can also resort to energy conservation measures,” he said.

“Clearly, there are alternatives other than making consumers pay billions,” he said.

* However, he lamented that Energy Secretary Jericho Petilla appears fixated on contracting additional power from foreign suppliers.

He said per DOE’s estimate, this option would cost consumers P6 billion for 300 megawatts of contracted electricity.

“That’s a huge amount for our people to pay. Contracting power for one year or two years when we need additional electricity only for three months should be our last option,” he said.

House

On Sept. 11, at the launch of a power plant project in Pagbilao, Quezon, Aquino said he was seeking special authority from Congress “to contract an additional generating capacity to address the 300-megawatt projected deficit, and… to have sufficient regulating reserves equivalent to four percent of peak demand, for another 300 megawatts.”

If all the 600 MW were contracted, the cost involved on the part of consumers would be P12 billion over two years, the envisioned minimum contract period.

In the same Pagbilao event, Petilla told reporters that his estimate of the cost involved was $20 million or about P8.8 billion per 100 MW.

Roadmap

Cagayan de Oro City Rep. Rufus Rodriguez, a member of the Joint Congressional Power Commission, said Petilla should present to Congress “a roadmap consisting of concrete viable actions that the President can do if he is given emergency powers.”

FROM THE INQUIRER

EU, PH back peaceful resolution of sea row By Christian V. Esguerra |Philippine Daily Inquirer1:07 am | Wednesday, September 17th, 2014

Dispute should be settled by int’l arbitration


European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso, right, and Philippine President Benigno Aquino III address the media at the European Commission headquarters in Brussels, Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. They discussed the Mindanao Peace negotiations, trade and investment, bilateral development cooperation and maritime issues. AP PHOTO/YVES LOGGHE

BRUSSELS—The Philippines and the European Union (EU) agree that territorial disputes in the South China Sea should be resolved through international arbitration.

This was made clear when President Aquino sat down on Monday with European Commission President José Manuel Barroso at the EC headquarters in the Berlaymont building here, as both leaders emphasized the need to settle differences between China and its neighbors peacefully.

With both the Philippines and the EU seeking the same route, Aquino said “China will have to listen,” noting that the EU is its “biggest trading partner.”

Beijing, which is claiming around 90 percent of the South China Sea, has rejected international arbitration, insisting that disputes should be resolved bilaterally with individual claimants like the Philippines.

“Let me stress that the European Union encourages all parties to seek peaceful solutions, through dialogue and cooperation, in accordance with international law—in particular with the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea [Unclos],” Barroso said in a joint press conference with Aquino at the EC headquarters.

The European Union, he said, is a “proud” party to the 1976 Treaty of Amity and Cooperation in Southeast Asia, which seeks to “promote perpetual peace, everlasting amity and cooperation” in the region.

Triple Action Plan

“We recall its fundamental principles, namely to settle differences by peaceful means, to renounce the threat or use of force and to effectively cooperate among partners,” Barroso said.

The Triple Action Plan being pushed by Manila was not mentioned in the press conference. But the EU position expressed by Barroso is apparently aligned with the Philippine proposal.

* Aquino assured Barroso that the Philippines “remains committed to advancing a peaceful, rules-based resolution to the disputes in the South China Sea, which is a sea known in our region by many names.”

“Like the European Union, we believe that the only viable and effective solution is one that is based on international law—in particular, under the [Unclos]. This is the basis for the arbitral proceedings we initiated last year.”

Code of conduct

Aquino said the Philippines continues to work with its Southeast Asian neighbors and China toward “the early conclusion of a Code of Conduct in the South China Sea.”

In an interview with reporters during his flight from Madrid to Brussels, the President noted that China, like the Philippines and other claimant countries, was “interested in prosperity for [its] people.”

“Prosperity cannot happen without stability and all of these claims and counterclaims, and also the simply heightened tensions of the same, are impacting on our ability to have a stable environment,” he said.

Barroso “congratulated” Aquino “on the remarkable economic performance of the Philippines.”

But he also reminded Aquino that “economic reforms need to continue to increase the competitiveness and productivity of the country.”

Illegal fishing

Aquino told Barroso that the Philippines was “actively undertaking measures to effectively combat and put a stop to illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing.”

He said Philippine agencies were in “close coordination” with the EC’s Directorate General for Maritime Affairs and Fisheries. He also cited his government’s “action plan” to “prevent, deter and eliminate” illegal fishing.

Aquino informed Barroso that the Philippines had “already laid the groundwork for an effective and sustainable regulatory system consistent with” the Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers Convention.

The President got Barroso’s assurance that the EU would continue supporting peace and development in Mindanao with projects amounting to 106 million euros.

Barroso commended the President for the peace efforts in Mindanao, particularly the signing of a peace agreement with the Moro Islamic Liberation Front in March.

“I congratulated President Aquino for his efforts to bring peace, stability and development to the Philippines,” he said.

In a separate meeting with European Council President Herman Van Rompuy on Tuesday, Aquino welcomed the EU’s new maritime strategy, noting that it was “anchored on the principles of international law.”

“This new maritime strategy, might I note, emphasizes the rules-based governance of the maritime domain, the respect for existing international instruments such as the [Unclos], as well as maritime multilateralism,” he said in a joint press conference with Van Rompuy.

Cooperative solutions

Van Rompuy added his voice to calls urging “peaceful and cooperative solutions” to disputes in the South China Sea, particularly through Unclos.

The EU strategy, which would be backed by a concrete action plan by yearend, apparently sits well for the Philippines.

“We indeed value the EU’s contributions to ensuring the peaceful and rules-based settlement of the conflicting claims in the South China Sea, an area which has served as a common domain for the many peoples of our region for centuries,” Aquino said.

“As President, I believe that the EU may contribute so much more in championing this meaningful cause—in particular, in helping convince other parties to refrain from activities that increase tensions, clarify their claims based on the Unclos, and thus submit the disputes to reasonable, rules-based, peaceful modes of resolution, such as arbitration.”

To address infra confab

Aquino said he was banking on the EU to “convince other parties to refrain from activities that increase tensions” and “clarify their claims based on the Unclos.”

The President on Tuesday also was to address an infrastructure conference and deliver a policy speech at the Egmont Institute in the Castle of Val Duchesse to mark the 50th anniversary of Philippine-EU relations.

FROM THE MANILA BULLETIN

Settle sea row peacefully – EU by Genalyn Kabiling September 17, 2014 (updated) MANILA DAILY BULLETIN

European head tells claimants that solution to conflict must be based on international law


ROYAL WELCOME – King Philippe of Belgium (right) welcomes President Aquino at the Royal Palace in Brussels Monday. Aquino is on an official visit to Belgium. (AFP)

Brussels, Belgium – The European Union (EU) has called anew on countries with competing claims in the South China Sea to resolve their conflict through the rule of law.

European Commission President José Manuel Barroso issued the call following a meeting with President Aquino last Monday.

“Let me stress that the European Union encourages all parties to seek peaceful solutions, through dialogue and cooperation, in accordance with international law – in particular with the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea,” Barroso said in a joint press conference with Aquino at the EC headquarters in Brussels.

Belgium echoed EU’s call for a peaceful resolution to the territorial conflict. President Aquino thanked Belgian Prime Minister Elio Di Rupo for the support during their meeting at the Prime Minister’s office-residence in Brussels.

In his meeting with the Belgian prime minister, President Aquino shared the country’s Triple Action Plan in addressing the concerns in the South China Sea; the Philippines’ calls for the full and effective implementation of the ASEAN-China Declaration on the Conduct of Parties in the South China Sea (DOC); the expeditious conclusion of a legally-binding Code of Conduct (COC); and for the implementation of a settlement mechanism that will bring the disputes to a final solution grounded on international law, particularly the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS).

RENOUNCE USE OF FORCE

“The European Union is proud to be a party of the Treaty of Amity and Cooperation, and we recall its fundamental principles, namely to settle differences by peaceful means, to renounce the threat or use of force and to effectively cooperate among partners,” Barroso added.

Aquino, who arrived in Brussels last Monday for a two-day working visit, earlier lobbied for EU support to the country’s position to resolve the territorial conflict with China through the arbitration process.

With the latest EU pronouncement on the maritime dispute, President Aquino is crossing his fingers that China, which has been criticized for its aggressive claims in the disputed territory, would heed to the appeal of the European bloc.

“China’s growth is dependent on trade. And the European Union in particular is very conscious of so many parameters with regards to who they will trade with,” the President said in a media interview on board his flight from Madrid to Brussels last Monday.

“China will have to listen because the European Union is, I think, the biggest trading partner of China,” he added.

* In his remarks at the EC headquarters, President Aquino said the Philippines remains committed “to advancing a peaceful, rules-based resolution to the disputes in the South China Sea, which is a sea known in our region by many names.”

VIABLE SOLUTION

“Like the European Union, we believe that the only viable and effective solution is one that is based on international law – and in particular, under the UNCLOS. This is the basis for the arbitral proceedings we initiated last year,” Aquino said.

He said the Philippines will also continue to work with the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) and with China toward the early conclusion of a legally binding Code of Conduct in the South China Sea.

Aquino also recognized that any increase of tension in the South China Sea might lead to “unmanageable situation which threatens everybody’s life blood and the economy.” He argued that prosperity in the region cannot happen without stability.

At the end of the day, Aquino said he still believes China, like the Philippines, is “interested in prosperity for our people.”

The President welcomed the new EU Maritime Security Strategy and its increased interest to be “more actively engaged in ensuring freedom of navigation in the seas of Asia” during a meeting with European Council President Herman Van Rompuy in Brussels on Tuesday.

“We indeed value the EU’s contributions to ensuring the peaceful and rules-based settlement of the conflicting claims in the South China Sea, an area which has served as a common domain for the many peoples of our region for centuries,” the President said.

AGGRESSIVE MOVES

China has been aggressively asserting its ownership over most of the South China Sea, triggering protests from other claimant nations. The Philippines, Brunei, Malaysia, Vietnam and Taiwan have also claimed parts of the sea, believed to be rich in oil and gas deposits.

The relations between the Philippines and China have been tested due to the reported increased presence of Chinese ships within its territory. Manila has already filed an arbitration complaint to defend its claim in the South China Sea (West Philippine Sea).

Earlier, the President announced that Spain has offered to be the “voice for the Philippines” in the EU on various issues, including the dispute with China in the West Philippine Sea.

Aquino secured such commitment when he sat down with Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy for a meeting in Madrid last Monday morning.

Aquino said Spain has expressed “concern” over the developments in the South China Sea, especially after seeing the photographs of alleged reclamation projects of China in the disputed territory.

Asked if Spain promised to endorse the Philippines’ Triple Action Plan (TAP), that includes a call for a cessation of provocative actions in the South China Sea, to the EU, Aquino said this was still premature. For now, he said, they have adopted “the soundness of the actions we have been taken.”

FROM THE TRIBUNE

RP ‘quasi-rogue’ state — Chinese media Written by Joshua L. Labonera Thursday, 18 September 2014 00:00

China’s state-controlled media have turned up the heat on President Aquino, branding the Philippines in an editorial as a “quasi-rogue” state even as it demanded a public apology from Malacañang over “the serial attacks on Chinese citizens” in the country.

The Tuesday opinion in the English-language newspaper The Global Times which usually serves as the voice of the regime, is one of a series of attacks against Manila following the abductions of three Chinese citizens in the Philippines in a span of five days and the alleged plan to attack the Chinese Embassy in Manila by a self-styled anti-China group.

It also recalled the 2010 Luneta hostage crisis when eight Hong Kong citizens died.

“Poor social governance, an anti-China sentiment, and a Western-style democratic system where nationalism can foment wantonly make the Philippines a quasi-rogue state,” it noted.

Beijing has warned its citizens not to travel to the Philippines and reminded Chinese citizens in the country to take precautions.

“We demand that Philippine President Benigno Aquino III makes a public apology for the serial attacks on Chinese citizens and severely reprimands the criminals, which may add to our confidence in the Philippine government ensuring the safety of Chinese citizens.”

Also, the editorial called on the government to take action to crack down on provocations emanating from the extreme anti-China sentiment.

Global Times cited the recent incident where a Chinese citizen sustained life-threatening injuries after being shot in Bulacan province and the abduction of two Chinese on Sept. 8 and 11.

“Although the Philippines is suffering from a deteriorating security situation, the spate of incidents targeting the Chinese over the past week inevitably prompts the public to connect them to the escalation in tension between Beijing and Manila,” it said.

* Diplomatic relations between China and the Philippines have been extremely tense in recent years due to a dispute over competing territorial claims in the South China Sea.

China’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs and National Tourism Administration have both advised Chinese tourists to avoid traveling to the Philippines. Many travel agencies have suspended services to the Philippines, which means its tourist industry is bound to suffer heavy losses.

Beijing has urged Manila to arrest the criminals and guarantee the safety of Chinese citizens in the Philippines.

“However, we can’t expect the warnings will yield instant results. In 2010 eight Hong Kong tourists died in a bus hijacking in Manila and in 2013 a fisherman from Taiwan was shot dead by the Philippine Coast Guard. The Philippine government failed to adopt immediate measures each time,” it lamented.

“To begin with, the Philippine authorities are a major agitator of a nationalist and anti-China sentiment among its population, which can easily turn into extremism.”

Global Times also accused the Philippines of lacking the ability to manage safety issues.

“Consequently, certain criminals may take advantage of this anti-China mood as a cover to increase the likelihood of escaping punishment for their crimes.”

The simple promise to “guarantee the safety of Chinese citizens in the Philippines” emanating from Manila came so easy, but lacks any particular sincerity from its authorities or support from its police, the editorial read.

China, however, said it will not sever its engagement with the Philippines “as it is our near neighbor.”

“Nevertheless, given what it has done recently, we are highly suspicious of whether it is capable of abiding by international laws,” it noted.

Meanwhile, Aquino refused to comment on editorials from Beijing-backed newspapers, reiterating the country’s stand in the territorial dispute before the European Union (EU).

According to him, the government is keen on resolving the issue diplomatically through international bodies.

“Our commitment to the rule of law is evident not only in our domestic dealings. Many will find it consistent with the stance we have taken on the international level, regarding the dispute on the sea known by many names in our part of the world — or what we call the West Philippine Sea,” Aquino said.

“We maintain that we must pursue a solution that adheres to the rule of law — and one that maintains peace and the freedom of navigation in the region. In fact, I would like to note that our emphasis on the rule of law has helped reinforce the principle of Asean Centrality,” he said.

Aquino has noted a unanimous statement from the 24th Asean Summit meeting months ago expressing serious concerns over ongoing developments in the South China Sea.

The President told EU leaders that the Philippines is citing the importance of fully implementing the 2002 Declaration on the Conduct of Parties in the South China Sea.

Aquino said “the country emphasizes the need for the expeditious conclusion of a binding Code of Conduct again, in the South China Sea.”

“Such developments redound to the benefit not only of the Asia-Pacific region, but of the international community as well, considering that one estimate puts 40 percent of world trade as traversing this particular sea,” he added.

Aquino said his administration has full respect for the rule of law, adding it is ready to contribute to the stability of all regions in promoting global order informed by fairness, equality, and a sustainable harmony.

“In my part of the world, Southeast Asians, too, are working closely to build a community of nations that work together to achieve security, peace, and prosperity for its peoples, and I am proud to say that my country, the Philippines, is playing an increasingly prominent role in this regard, due to our country’s resurgence,” he said.

FROM PHILSTAR

Marcos: Philippines must sit down with China to end sea dispute By Louis Bacani (philstar.com) | Updated September 17, 2014 - 3:24pm
8 628 googleplus4 0


Sen. Ferdinand Marcos Jr. gestures during the Kapihan sa Senado forum in June. Senate PRIB/Cesar Tomambo

MANILA, Philippines - The Philippines should pursue the bilateral negotiations proposed by China to solve the West Philippine Sea dispute, Sen. Ferdinand Marcos Jr. said.

In an interview with ANC's Beyond Politics, Marcos said the maritime row will not be settled with finality if the two countries do not sign an agreement on the issue.

"Hindi magkakaroon ng agreement na iyan kung hindi natin kinakausap ang China. China has already made very clear that this adjudication process that's being undertaken right now is not one that they will honor," Marcos told program host Lynda Jumilla.

Marcos said it is time for the Philippines to sit down with China.

"In the end of the day, it will have to be China and the Philippines sitting down at the table signing an agreement to put an end to all these tensions and all of these difficulties that we are having over the conflicting claims in the West Philippine Sea," the senator said.

Lawyer Harry Roque Jr., an international law expert, also believes that the Philippines should consider bilateral talks since the country is obliged to resort to all peaceful means as a signatory of the United Nations charter.

"If I were him (President Aquino), I will still do it behind closed doors," Roque said in a past interview. "We should be exhausting all means for peaceful resolution of this dispute."

Presidential Spokesperson Edwin Lacierda has said that the country cannot have bilateral discussions with China because the sea dispute involves more than two parties.

The Philippines is pursuing a Triple Action Plan (TAP) aimed to reduce and manage maritime tensions.

* On the immediate level, the Philippines is seeking a moratorium on construction efforts and other activities that may increase tensions in the contested territories.

For an intermediate approach, the country is pushing for the full and effective implementation of the Declaration on the Conduct of Parties in the South China Sea and the expeditious conclusion of the Code of Conduct.

As a final approach, the TAP stresses the need for a settlement mechanism anchored on international law. The Philippines has filed an arbitration case that would clarify the maritime entitlements of claimant countries.

FROM THE INQUIRER

Aquino confronted on human rights record in Belgium forum By Christian V. Esguerra |Philippine Daily Inquirer1:20 pm | Wednesday, September 17th, 2014


President Benigno Aquino III gives a statement after a meeting with the European Union President on September 16, 2014 at the EU headquarters in Brussels. AFP

BRUSSELS, Belgium—President Benigno Aquino III was put on the spot over his administration’s human rights record shortly after he delivered a wide-ranging policy speech organized by an independent think tank here.

Shortly after four protesters from Migrante Europe greeted his convoy at the entrance of Château of Val-Duchesse on Tuesday (Wednesday, Manila time), Aquino rejected what he called “blanket statements” detailing how “human rights violations had not stopped” since he took office four years ago.

During the open forum that followed Aquino’s speech, one participant also mentioned the government’s revised counterinsurgency program, Oplan Bayanihan, saying it appeared to “endanger” the lives of some of his own people.

“Well, those are blanket statements and we don’t necessarily agree with them,” he told his audience in a forum organized by the Egmont Institute.

“It is not our policy to encourage or even abet any transgressions of the law. And towards that end, we have been investigating all of these allegations,” he added, citing also the arrest of former Major Gen. Jovito Palparan, who is facing criminal charges over the disappearance of two student activists.

“We have adopted a policy that their only deterrence to crime is the certainty of punishment.”

* Aquino acknowledged that the Philippine justice system was slow, but vowed that the government was “trying to do our utmost to advance the solution of all of these crimes.”

“But we do have to work with the tools that we have on hand,” he said.

“We have an adversarial system of justice and it takes such a long time to be able to present the personal circumstances to accuse each one of a specific action and wheels of justice would hopefully move faster than what they are doing now.”

The President cited the task force created to go after those behind extrajudicial killings “with the end in view of arresting every culprit regardless of whether it was a media individual, an activist, or any other individual.”

“We have adopted a policy that their only deterrence to crime is the certainty of punishment,” he said.

Of 54 cases of media killings, some of which happened prior to his term, he said there had been 10 cases of conviction.
The President also maintained that not all cases of so-called “media killings” were related to the job.

“For instance, in the media killings, some who used to work in media died. Did they die because they were investigative journalists? Were they exercising their profession in a responsible manner, living up to journalistic ethics? Or did they perish because of other reasons?” he said.


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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