FUGITIVE FOR 3 YEARS: THE 'BUTCHER' IS ARRESTED  

PHOTO: Retired Army Maj. Gen. Jovito Palparan sought refuge in a two-story house in Sta. Mesa district for four months until agents of the National Bureau of Investigation (NBI) and the Intelligence Service of the Armed Forces of the Philippines (ISAFP) cornered him at 3 a.m. The three-year hunt for the man described as “The Butcher” by left-wing militants ended early yesterday in a former safe house of communist New People’s Army (NPA) rebels in Manila. The dilapidated building on Teresita Street was not only near the Polytechnic University of the Philippines (PUP), but is also surrounded by NPA-infested slums, a source from the NBI said. “That’s why we initially had misgivings on the information provided to us,” the source added. Palparan knew his days were numbered.

The 64-year-old former Army general calmly faced the media and said he realized his world as a fugitive was getting smaller. “I am also human, we also fail,” a gaunt Palparan said. He had just gotten up from his makeshift bed when he was cornered. He said noises coming from the rusty galvanized roof above his bedroom window roused him from sleep.When he peeked out to check the source of the noise, an armed NBI agent immediately went in and frisked him. “General Palparan, NBI ito,” Palparan said, quoting the arresting agent. Palparan, clad in a T-shirt and knee-length walking shorts, said it was pointless to resist. “If there will be an arrest, I will not counter, I’ll give myself up,” he said. * CONTINUE READING...

ALSO: Palace to other high-profile fugitives: We’re coming after you too  

Following the arrest of retired Army general and kidnapping suspect Jovito Palparan, Malacañang on Tuesday assured the public that other high-profile fugitives are also being pursued. At a press briefing, Communications Secretary Herminio Coloma Jr. said the government is determined to bring to justice high-profile suspects who remain at large. "Ang pagkadakip kay dating Heneral Jovito Palparan ay magbibigay daan upang siya ay sumailalim sa mga proseso ng katarungan sa ilalim ng batas. Patuloy na sinisikap ng ating mga alagad ng batas na tugisin at mahuli ang iba pang pinaghahanap ng batas—‘yung mga high-profile suspect," Coloma told reporters. "Patuloy din ‘yung pagkilos ng ating mga alagad ng batas para sila ay matunton at mapanagot," he added.

Palparan, one of the country's so-called "Big 5" fugitives, was nabbed in Manila earlier in the day by agents of the National Bureau of Investigation (NBI) and the Armed Forces. The retired general is facing two counts of kidnapping and serious illegal detention before a Bulacan court for the alleged abduction of University of the Philippines students Sherlyn Cadapan and Karen Empeño. Among the so-called "Big 5" fugitives, former Palawan Gov. Joel Reyes and his brother Mario Reyes and Dinagat Rep. Ruben Ecleo are the only ones who remain at large. Already arrested earlier this year are businessman Delfin Lee, who is facing a P6.6-billion syndicated estafa case, and suspected communist leader Benito Tiamzon and his wife, Wilma. The Reyes brothers and the Tiamzon couple are both treated as single entities. Human rights violations At the same press briefing, Coloma stressed that President Aquino remains committed to addressing human rights violations in the country. "Matibay ang determinasyon ng ating Pangulo na iharap sa hukuman at panagutin ang mga mayroong usapin sa paglabag ng mga karapatang pantao at sa paglabag ng batas," the Palace official said. * CONTINUE READING...

ALSO: Palparan’s flight means guilt–DOJ; ‘Butcher’ of Arroyo admin falls 

Flight means guilt and retired Army Maj. Gen. Jovito Palparan’s lamming it for three years means he has responsibility for the disappearance of University of the Philippines students Karen Empeño and Sherlyn Cadapan, a state prosecutor said on Tuesday after the capture of one of the Philippines’ most-wanted fugitives. Military and National Bureau of Investigation agents captured Palparan, 64, in his hideout in a neighborhood known to be a lair of communist New People’s Army (NPA) rebels in Manila’s Sta. Mesa district early Tuesday. Palparan sent surrender feelers to President Aquino last year, but Aquino rejected his offer to surrender and ordered Defense Secretary Voltaire Gazmin to form a task force dedicated to the capture of the fugitive.

The end of the hunt for Palparan, former commander of the Philippine Army’s 7th Infantry Division, brought the government’s “Big Five” list down to three, and Malacañang said law enforcers would not stop until all of them were brought in. The others on that list are Delfin Lee, alleged brains behind the P7-billion housing scam in Pampanga province, who was captured at Hyatt Regency Hotel and Casino in Manila on March 6; former Palawan Gov. Joel Reyes and his brother, former Coron Mayor Mario Reyes, who are wanted for the Jan. 24, 2011, murder of environmentalist and broadcaster Gerardo Ortega; and former Dinagat Rep. Ruben Ecleo, who is wanted for the 2002 murder of his wife, Alona, and running from a 31-year jail term for graft handed down by the Sandiganbayan in 2006. Palparan has a P5-million price on his head. Lee had P2 million, and each of the others also P2 million. “They continue to be on the list of high-profile and at-large suspects and our law enforcers continue to work to find them and make them accountable [for their crimes],” Communications Secretary Herminio Coloma told a news briefing in Malacañang.
Promise fulfilled --* READ MORE...

ALSO: No justice until Palparan confesses, says mother of abducted UP student  

PHOTO: Concepcion Empeño (center) and Erlinda Cadapan, mothers of missing UP students Karen Empeño and Sherlyn Cadapan hold pictures of their daughters during a meeting with Sen. Mar Roxas. The mothers are seeking help from Roxas to find their missing children who were believed abducted by the military in Bulacan.  “There’s no justice until he admits he abducted my daughter and killed her,” said Erlinda Cadapan, mother of University of the Philippines student Sherlyn Cadapan who was allegedly kidnapped by soldiers under the command of Army Maj. Gen. Jovito Palparan, who was captured in Manila early Tuesday. “We laud the arrest of the butcher, but there is no justice until he confesses to his crimes,” Cadapan said, using the moniker used by human rights activists for Palparan, former commander of the Philippine Army 7th Infantry Division. Erlinda Cadapan joined a rally staged by rights activists at the entrance to the National Bureau of Investigation office in Manila following the announcement of Palparan’s arrest. She said she hoped Palparan would tell the truth about the disappearance of her daughter, who was seized by armed men in Hagonoy town, Bulacan province, together with another UP student, Karen Empeño and farmer Manuel Merino on June 26, 2006. The three were never seen again. * CONTINUE READING...

ALSO: 5 things you need to know about Jovito Palparan 

PHOTO: Philippine Army Brigadier General Jovito Palparan (R), commander of the Filipino-Iraq contingent, congratulates policemen who were part of the small Philippine military contingent in Iraq during ceremony at the military headquarters in Manila 04 August 2004. Here are five things you need to know about retired Major General Jovito S. Palparan Jr., who was arrested by National Bureau of Investigation agents on Tuesday morning after three years in hiding:

1. Palparan is a decorated soldier and led various military units. Palparan was born on September 11, 1950 in Cagayan De Oro City. He has a wife and father of five children. He graduated with a degree of BS Business Administration in the University of the East and was commissioned to the Armed Forces of the Philippines in 1973.
He first served as a lieutenant in Basilan and Sulu and he later served as the Commanding Officer of the 24th Infantry Battalion, 8th Infantry Division in Eastern Samar and in the 7th Infantry Division in Mindoro.
He was awarded with the Gold Cross medal and the Gawad sa Kanluran medal, along with other military distinctions.*CONTINUE READING...

ALSO: ‘I don’t want to be killed by communists’ 

The “butcher” whom leftist activists feared the most and suspect of being the military brass behind many human rights violations perpetrated by security forces, including extrajudicial killings and disappearances, seeks to be protected from communists.
“I don’t want special treatment,” said captured fugitive Maj. Gen. (ret.) Jovito Palparan on Tuesday, “but the government must give me adequate security because I don’t want to be killed by ‘the enemy.’ “  By “the enemy” he meant the communist New People’s Army operatives whom he hunted down as an AFP officer until he retired. He then entered politics, became a congressman, and fled when he was going to be arrested to face charges on two counts of kidnapping, serious illegal detention in connection with the disappearance of University of the Philippines students Sherlyn Cadapan and Karen Empeño. Palparan became one of the most publicized wanted fugitives since he went into hiding in 2011. Shortly after his arrest early on Tuesday, Palparan repeatedly said — to print, radio-TV reporters and news anchors interviewing him — that he did not wish to die in the hands of “the enemy.” Palparan, gaunt, long haired and wearing a beard, did not resist arrest when agents of the National Bureau of Investigation (NBI) and intelligence agents of the Philippine Navy swooped down on the house in Barangay 626, Old Sta. Mesa, Manila, where he had been hiding since May.* READ MORE...

ALSO: ‘Butcher’ left trail of disappearances  

PHOTO: Palparan hid at the second floor of this old wooden house along Teresa Street in Sta Mesa, Manila. Retired Maj. Gen. Jovito Palparan, the “Berdugo” (butcher), as he is known among activist groups, is blamed for hundreds of enforced disappearances and extrajudicial killings across the country. Based on the fact sheet by human rights group Karapatan (Rights), the following incidents are blamed on Palparan: • In 1991, 100 townspeople in Sta. Cruz, Zambales were arrested, interrogated, and forced to sign “affidavits of surrender” by soldiers of the 24th Infantry Division. Within six days, 10 families were forced to evacuate due to shelling operations. Palparan claimed that they were “rebel surrenderees.”
• The torture of Marcelo Fakila, a leader of the Cordillera Peoples’ Alliance in Mountain Province and village elder in Sagada, was said to have been committed by Palparan during his deployment to the Cordillera Administrative Region. In 1992 alone, six cases of illegal arrest, five cases of harassment, one case of disappearance, one summary execution, a case of wounding, and two cases of evacuations, were recorded during his assignment in the region.
• While Palparan was commander of Task Force Banahaw, which has jurisdiction over Rizal and Laguna, seven civilian killings were listed in 2001, including the death of a five-year-old. * CONTINUE READING...

ALSO: EDITORIAL - ‘The Butcher’ falls   

Militant groups and relatives of two desaparecidos from the University of the Philippines are rejoicing over the arrest yesterday of retired Army Maj. Gen. Jovito Palparan. The man dubbed “The Butcher” for the numerous human rights violations in the areas where he served as military commander had been in hiding for three years. Palparan was ordered arrested by the Bulacan Regional Trial Court for the kidnapping and serious illegal detention of UP students Sherilyn Cadapan and Karen Empeño in Bulacan in 2006. The two students, now among the Philippines’ “disappeared,” were reportedly taken and tortured by members of the Army’s 7th Infantry Division based in Central Luzon. With Palparan’s arrest, three things are expected from the government. One is to prevent his escape. While on the run, Palparan was believed to have been harbored by sympathetic elements in the military. Those elements can still spring him from detention and save him from a possible life term. * CONTINUE READING...


READ FULL REPORT HERE:

‘The Butcher’ arrested


Retired Army Maj. Gen. Jovito Palparan sought refuge in a two-story house in Sta. Mesa district for four months until agents of the National Bureau of Investigation (NBI) and the Intelligence Service of the Armed Forces of the Philippines (ISAFP) cornered him at 3 a.m. Photo by EDD GUMBAN

MANILA, AUGUST 18, 2014 (PHILSTAR) By Aie Balagtas See - The three-year hunt for the man described as “The Butcher” by left-wing militants ended early yesterday in a former safe house of communist New People’s Army (NPA) rebels in Manila.

Retired Army Maj. Gen. Jovito Palparan sought refuge in a two-story house in Sta. Mesa district for four months until agents of the National Bureau of Investigation (NBI) and the Intelligence Service of the Armed Forces of the Philippines (ISAFP) cornered him at 3 a.m.

The dilapidated building on Teresita Street was not only near the Polytechnic University of the Philippines (PUP), but is also surrounded by NPA-infested slums, a source from the NBI said.

“That’s why we initially had misgivings on the information provided to us,” the source added.

Palparan knew his days were numbered. The 64-year-old former Army general calmly faced the media and said he realized his world as a fugitive was getting smaller.

“I am also human, we also fail,” a gaunt Palparan said.

He had just gotten up from his makeshift bed when he was cornered. He said noises coming from the rusty galvanized roof above his bedroom window roused him from sleep.

When he peeked out to check the source of the noise, an armed NBI agent immediately went in and frisked him.

“General Palparan, NBI ito,” Palparan said, quoting the arresting agent.

Palparan, clad in a T-shirt and knee-length walking shorts, said it was pointless to resist.

“If there will be an arrest, I will not counter, I’ll give myself up,” he said.

* When he gave up, the bearded and frail-looking former general was asked to change into more appropriate clothes.

Then they brought him to the NBI main office in Manila, where he shaved off his speckled beard before facing the press.

Palparan was booked and examined by government doctors. He weighed less than a hundred pounds, had sore feet and blood pressure of 130/80.

During his stay at the safe house, Palparan said he even witnessed anti-Palparan protest rallies being held near his hideout.

“It is not my intention to stay there. I know that it is very near PUP. In fact, I pass them by whenever they hold a rally. There were even anti-Palparan placards. It was just a choice of my convenience, another consideration,” Palparan said.

Spotted

ISAFP chief Maj. Gen. Eduardo Año said Palparan has been staying in the house of his friend Grace Roa for three months.

The fugitive ex-general was spotted withdrawing money from a nearby automated teller machine before he was arrested.

“They served the warrant of arrest in the house of a certain Grace Roa. The warrant was served and General Palparan really did not resist arrest,” Año said.

“In fact, he was joking with our operatives and he was saying ‘you were good. You got one on me because I was very lax’,” he added.

Año said the arrest would provide Palparan an opportunity to face the allegations against him and to defend himself in court.

“At the same time, this will allow him to attend to some of his health concerns because he has been suffering from various illnesses, so this is the time for him to be able to have a proper medical checkup,” he added.

Año said Palparan has been suffering from heart problems, diabetes and high blood pressure.

Palparan, for his part, said life as a fugitive was very difficult.

Palparan said he would not encourage those hiding from the law. He said he had fears and apprehensions everyday during his life on the run.

“Very difficult. I don’t encourage those who want to hide from justice. It’s not a very easy thing to do. I would rather be in jail than living in constant threat everyday… there is always that fear and apprehension. You cannot do things you used to do,” he said.

Palparan said he wanted to surrender but could not because of the threat on his life. What further discouraged him from surfacing was the pronouncement by the NPA that he was a “dead man walking.”

Palparan, who had a P2-million bounty for his arrest, claimed he did not go into hiding because he was guilty but rather because he feared for his safety.

Palparan, called “The Butcher” by militant groups, had been in hiding for more than two years. A Bulacan court issued an arrest warrant against Palparan in 2011.

The former Army general is charged with two counts of kidnapping and serious illegal detention in the alleged abduction of UP students Karen Empeño and Sherilyn Cadapan in Hagonoy, Bulacan on June 26, 2006.

Admission of guilt

Justice Secretary Leila de Lima said Palparan’s hiding for almost three years could be an aggravating circumstance in proving his guilt on the charges against him.

“If you hide for so long, these are points against you because instead of justifying circumstance, what will be credited will be exempting or aggravating circumstances because flight is an admission of guilt. That is basic,” De Lima said.

De Lima said the case against Palparan pending with Malolos, Bulacan Regional Trial Court Branch 14, which has not moved since it was filed in December 2011, may now finally proceed.

Assistant State Prosecutor Juan Pedro Navera, who is handling the cases, agreed with De Lima’s position.

“Flight is an indication of guilt. That’s well established,” he said.

Navera further explained that since Palparan appeared during the earlier preliminary investigation in the Department of Justice, his flight after the filing of the case in court would show “aggravating circumstance applied to him.”

Now that Palparan is arrested, Navera said the case against the retired general would proceed.

Despite the delay in his arrest, Malacañang lauded the efforts of authorities in capturing Palparan.

“With his arrest, he may now be brought before the bar of justice and go through the process of accountability,” Presidential Communications Operations Office Secretary Herminio Coloma Jr. said.

Presidential spokesman Edwin Lacierda commended the Armed Forces of the Philippines and the NBI for their “steadfast doggedness in pursuing all leads to find and capture” Palparan.

“This resolute determination has paid off, the long arm of the law has finally reached Mr. Palparan. President Aquino promised that those who evade the law will be found. That promise to capture General Palparan has been fulfilled,” Lacierda said.

Officials admitted that bringing in the high profile personality such as Palparan was not an easy task.

“We are soldiers and we were taught that we should not be captured. Perhaps he was able to use the tactics and techniques on escape and evasion,” Defense Secretary Voltaire Gazmin said.

“Perhaps it is destiny that General Palparan is arrested,” he added.

Prior to his arrest, Palparan was said to have sought refuge in Bataan, Pampanga, Nueva Ecija and Cagayan de Oro.

“There were many attempts that were made in the past together with the NBI but we failed and finally, there was a breakthrough with the splendid effort of our NISF (Naval Intelligence and Security Force),” Año added.

With the arrest of Palparan, the Philippine National Police (PNP) is now poised to locate other fugitives.

National police spokesman Chief Superintendent Reuben Theodore Sindac said the PNP would try to locate other fugitives, particularly former Palawan governor Joel Reyes and his brother, Coron ex-mayor Mario Reyes, and former Dinagat Island Rep. Ruben Ecleo Jr.. each with a P2-million bounty. – Alexis Romero, Aurea Calica, Edu Punay, Cecille Suerte Felipe

FROM GMA NEWS NETWORK

Palace to other high-profile fugitives: We’re coming after you too By ANDREO CALONZO,GMA NewsAugust 12, 2014 2:48pm 118 1 0 120

Following the arrest of retired Army general and kidnapping suspect Jovito Palparan, Malacañang on Tuesday assured the public that other high-profile fugitives are also being pursued.

At a press briefing, Communications Secretary Herminio Coloma Jr. said the government is determined to bring to justice high-profile suspects who remain at large.

"Ang pagkadakip kay dating Heneral Jovito Palparan ay magbibigay daan upang siya ay sumailalim sa mga proseso ng katarungan sa ilalim ng batas. Patuloy na sinisikap ng ating mga alagad ng batas na tugisin at mahuli ang iba pang pinaghahanap ng batas—‘yung mga high-profile suspect," Coloma told reporters.

"Patuloy din ‘yung pagkilos ng ating mga alagad ng batas para sila ay matunton at mapanagot," he added.

Palparan, one of the country's so-called "Big 5" fugitives, was nabbed in Manila earlier in the day by agents of the National Bureau of Investigation (NBI) and the Armed Forces.

The retired general is facing two counts of kidnapping and serious illegal detention before a Bulacan court for the alleged abduction of University of the Philippines students Sherlyn Cadapan and Karen Empeño.

Among the so-called "Big 5" fugitives, former Palawan Gov. Joel Reyes and his brother Mario Reyes and Dinagat Rep. Ruben Ecleo are the only ones who remain at large.

Already arrested earlier this year are businessman Delfin Lee, who is facing a P6.6-billion syndicated estafa case, and suspected communist leader Benito Tiamzon and his wife, Wilma. The Reyes brothers and the Tiamzon couple are both treated as single entities.

Human rights violations

At the same press briefing, Coloma stressed that President Aquino remains committed to addressing human rights violations in the country.

"Matibay ang determinasyon ng ating Pangulo na iharap sa hukuman at panagutin ang mga mayroong usapin sa paglabag ng mga karapatang pantao at sa paglabag ng batas," the Palace official said.

* He added that more than just going after fugitives, the administration wants a stronger law enforcement system.

"Sa kabuuan, ang pinaka-layunin ng ating pamahalaan ay palakasin ang buong criminal justice system, pahusayin ang kapasidad ng kapulisan at ng iba pang mga law enforcement agencies, unang-una, para mapigilan mismo ‘yung pagganap ng krimen," he said.

"Dahil kapag naganap na ay meron nang buhay na nakuha, meron nang krimen na naganap laban sa kaligtasan ng mga mamamayan, kaya ‘yung buong sistema ang tinitingnan diyan, hindi lang naman ‘yung paghuli sa mga so-called high-profile suspects," Coloma added.

Progressive human rights group Karapatan earlier said that it has recorded at least 192 cases of extrajudicial killings under the Aquino administration.

During US President Barack Obama's visit to the Philippines last April, Aquino defended his administration's human rights record.

He said the government has been taking steps to address incidents of extrajudicial killings and forced disappearances in the Philippines, including the creation of an inter-agency committee to look into these cases.

The President also earlier said that out of the 62 suspected cases of extralegal killings reported to the committee, only 10 met the criteria of what constitutes an extrajudicial killing, and only one happened under his watch. — RSJ/YA, GMA News

FROM THE INQUIRER

Palparan’s flight means guilt–DOJ; ‘Butcher’ of Arroyo admin falls By Nancy C. Carvajal, Tarra Quismundo |Philippine Daily Inquirer1:14 am | Wednesday, August 13th, 2014


FUGITIVE GENERAL Retired Maj. Gen. Jovito Palparan, wanted for the disappearance of two University of the Philippines students, at the height of his power (left) commanded forces believed to have abducted and summarily executed activists. After three years in hiding, he was caught on Tuesday in Sta. Mesa, Manila, sporting long hair and a goatee. A clean-cut Palparan (right) was presented to the media at the National Bureau of Investigation. INQUIRER FILE PHOTO/NBI PHOTO/JOAN BONDOC

MANILA, Philippines–Flight means guilt and retired Army Maj. Gen. Jovito Palparan’s lamming it for three years means he has responsibility for the disappearance of University of the Philippines students Karen Empeño and Sherlyn Cadapan, a state prosecutor said on Tuesday after the capture of one of the Philippines’ most-wanted fugitives.

Military and National Bureau of Investigation agents captured Palparan, 64, in his hideout in a neighborhood known to be a lair of communist New People’s Army (NPA) rebels in Manila’s Sta. Mesa district early Tuesday.

Palparan sent surrender feelers to President Aquino last year, but Aquino rejected his offer to surrender and ordered Defense Secretary Voltaire Gazmin to form a task force dedicated to the capture of the fugitive.

The end of the hunt for Palparan, former commander of the Philippine Army’s 7th Infantry Division, brought the government’s “Big Five” list down to three, and Malacañang said law enforcers would not stop until all of them were brought in.

The others on that list are Delfin Lee, alleged brains behind the P7-billion housing scam in Pampanga province, who was captured at Hyatt Regency Hotel and Casino in Manila on March 6; former Palawan Gov. Joel Reyes and his brother, former Coron Mayor Mario Reyes, who are wanted for the Jan. 24, 2011, murder of environmentalist and broadcaster Gerardo Ortega; and former Dinagat Rep. Ruben Ecleo, who is wanted for the 2002 murder of his wife, Alona, and running from a 31-year jail term for graft handed down by the Sandiganbayan in 2006.

Palparan has a P5-million price on his head. Lee had P2 million, and each of the others also P2 million.

“They continue to be on the list of high-profile and at-large suspects and our law enforcers continue to work to find them and make them accountable [for their crimes],” Communications Secretary Herminio Coloma told a news briefing in Malacañang.

Promise fulfilled

* The Palace commended the military and the NBI for capturing Palparan, fulfilling President Aquino’s promise to bring high-profile criminal suspects to justice.

“President Aquino promised that those who evade the law will be found. The promise to capture General Palparan has been fulfilled today,” presidential spokesman Edwin Lacierda said in a statement.

Justice Secretary Leila de Lima met with President Aquino in Malacañang just before noon, presumably to report Palparan’s arrest.

Later she said the NBI had submitted a report to the President, but “some of its contents could not be shared with the public.”
The report includes the names of the informants who will be given the P5-million reward for Palparan’s capture, according to NBI Director Virgilio Mendez.

“We have submitted two reports and included are the names of the informants,” Mendez said.

Strong case

Assistant State Prosecutor Juan Pedro Navera, the lead prosecutor in the kidnapping and serious illegal detention case against Palparan and other military officers, said Palparan’s flight from justice for nearly three years had strengthened the government’s case involving the abduction and disappearance of Cadapan and Empeño.

“Flight is an indication of guilt. That’s well established. Remember that he appeared initially during the preliminary investigation of this case. He only went into hiding after we indicted him. So the aggravating circumstance already applies to him,” Navera told reporters on Tuesday.

Palparan, Army Lt. Col. Felipe Anotado, Staff Sgt. Edgardo Osorio and M/Sgt. Rizal Hilario are undergoing trial for the abduction of Cadapan, Empeño and farmer Manuel Merino in Hagonoy town, Bulacan province, in 2006.

Anotado and Osorio surrendered in December 2011 while Hilario remains at large.

The prosecution rested its case in the Malolos Regional Trial Court against Anotado and Osorio last year while the defense was given until Aug. 18 to present witnesses.

Back to square one

As for Palparan, Navera said the prosecution would start from square one in presenting evidence.

“We will have to repeat the same procedure all over again. We will present all the relevant witnesses, some of whom we have already presented against the other accused. There’s no choice but to present them again,” Navera said in an interview at the Department of Justice (DOJ) Tuesday afternoon.

Palparan, also a former party-list congressman, was captured at 3:30 a.m. in his hideout above a 24-hour bakery and coffee shop at Teresa and Old Sta. Mesa streets in Manila, just meters away from Polytechnic University of the Philippines and a police station.

He is temporarily held at NBI headquarters in Manila.

Gazmin and Armed Forces of the Philippines Chief of Staff Lt. Gen. Gregorio Pio Catapang announced Palparan’s capture, which coincided with the observance of International Humanitarian Law Day.

“It was a joint operation by the AFP and the NBI. General Palparan should be turned over to the NBI because he is already a civilian. As such, he is no longer under the jurisdiction of the AFP,” Gazmin said.

Difficult to find

Gazmin and Catapang acknowledged the difficulty the authorities had in finding Palparan, which they attributed to his knowledge of intelligence and combat operations.

“You know that he was a soldier, and he knows military tactics, techniques of escape and evasion, so he was able to apply those skills, plus he has friends who helped him hide,” Gazmin said, adding he was sure no one in the military aided Palparan in running from the law.

Catapang said Palparan offered no resistance when confronted by the law enforcers.

“In fact, when he was arrested, he said it was good that he had been caught, as he had ailments and he needed medical attention. He said he was a diabetic,” Catapang said.

Catapang said a Naval Intelligence and Security Force (NISF) informant tipped off the government to Palparan’s whereabouts after spotting the fugitive withdrawing money from an automated teller machine in Sta. Mesa.

Asked where Palparan would be held, Navera said the prosecution panel would comment after the former general’s side had made a manifestation.

“Normally, he would be detained [in a jail] nearest the court trying the case, which means ideally, he should be detained at the Bulacan Provincial Jail … We have to await the manifestation of Palparan before we can address whether we can object or argue as to where he should be properly detained. But I heard he will not invoke hospital arrest,” Navera said.

Sta. Mesa hideout

NBI sources said informants had traced Palparan to the Sta. Mesa house, the entrance to which was about 3 meters away from the road and had a steel door that was always closed.


POKING FUN AT ‘BERDUGO’ In a rally at the NBI headquarters in Manila where Palparan is held, activists use spears to poke [fun] at an effigy of the man they call “berdugo” (butcher). RICHARD A. REYES

“Palparan could see the school and the activities below from the window of his safe house,” said Rommel Vallejo, head of the NBI Anti-Organized Crime Division.

In a news conference at NBI headquarters, Palparan denied he chose that place because it was the last place where the authorities would look for him.

“I did not think of it that way. It’s just now that I realized its irony,” he said.

He said he knew who ratted on him, but added he had no ill feelings toward them.

Palparan praised the NBI for finding him, saying he never sensed the authorities were closing in on him.

“I do not feel I was betrayed, because I barely knew the informants. I slipped and the NBI was good. My failure was their success. This is the first time that my intelligence failed me. I did not get advanced information,” Palparan said.

He said he had been hiding in many places, all in Metro Manila.

“I do not have money to leave the country and could not afford to live abroad so I stayed in Metro Manila where I am familiar with the terrain,” he said.

No support from military

Palparan denied he had been hiding in Army headquarters at Camp Aguinaldo, receiving support from officers in active service. But he acknowledged getting support from former followers in the service and in his party-list circle.

He also denied receiving support from former President and now Pampanga Rep. Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo, who praised him in her State of the Nation Address to a joint session of Congress in 2006.

Vallejo said Palparan was sleeping when his men and the Naval Intelligence Group swooped on his safe house at around 3:30 a.m. on Tuesday.

Palparan, who sported a goatee and long hair, “looked despondent and far different from a proud man when we arrested him,” Vallejo said.

He added that two people were arrested with Palparan.

Palparan in an interview at NBI headquarters after his arrest confirmed that he sent surrender feelers to President Aquino, but was turned down.

He said the President told his classmates who contacted the Palace that he should coordinate his surrender with Gazmin.
“I continued to hide after President Aquino declined that I [surrender] to him, I wanted to personally surrender to the President for security reasons,” he said.

Breakthrough

Vallejo said NBI agents had close calls with Palparan in other locations, but the breakthrough came on Sunday when an informant spotted him outside the safe house.

“We were watching the house since Sunday and we decided to enter the safe house after an agent who peeped through a hole in one of the closed windows confirmed the presence of the fugitive,” Vallejo said.

He added that Palparan was unarmed and quickly identified himself when he saw the arresting officers.

“He did not resist and immediately identified himself and even showed us identification cards to show that he was General Palparan,” Vallejo said.

Mendez said the NBI’s priority was to ensure Palparan’s safety but he would not be given special treatment.

“He had no request but his security,” Mendez told reporters.

He said Palparan would be temporarily detained in the NBI pending a commitment order from the court.–With reports from Nikko Dizon, Cynthia D. Balana and Julie M. Aurelio

No justice until Palparan confesses, says mother of abducted UP student  By Nancy C. Carvajal, Tarra Quismundo |Philippine Daily Inquirer2:16 am | Wednesday, August 13th, 2014


Concepcion Empeño (center) and Erlinda Cadapan, mothers of missing UP students Karen Empeño and Sherlyn Cadapan hold pictures of their daughters during a meeting with Sen. Mar Roxas. The mothers are seeking help from Roxas to find their missing children who were believed abducted by the military in Bulacan. RODEL ROTONI

MANILA, Philippines–“There’s no justice until he admits he abducted my daughter and killed her,” said Erlinda Cadapan, mother of University of the Philippines student Sherlyn Cadapan who was allegedly kidnapped by soldiers under the command of Army Maj. Gen. Jovito Palparan, who was captured in Manila early Tuesday.

“We laud the arrest of the butcher, but there is no justice until he confesses to his crimes,” Cadapan said, using the moniker used by human rights activists for Palparan, former commander of the Philippine Army 7th Infantry Division.

Erlinda Cadapan joined a rally staged by rights activists at the entrance to the National Bureau of Investigation office in Manila following the announcement of Palparan’s arrest.

She said she hoped Palparan would tell the truth about the disappearance of her daughter, who was seized by armed men in Hagonoy town, Bulacan province, together with another UP student, Karen Empeño and farmer Manuel Merino on June 26, 2006.

The three were never seen again.

* Meeting with Palparan

Erlinda Cadapan, who lives in Laguna province but was in a relative’s home in Manila when she received news of Palparan’s capture, said she wanted to meet the former Army officer but she was not sure whether the authorities would allow the meeting.

“They finally caught the culprit. I was a little dizzy but that did not stop me from shrieking and crying,” she said.

“I want to ask him to tell us the truth about where our daughters are. I will be very calm when I see him,” she said, referring to Empeño’s mother.

“I know Sherlyn is alive,” she said, adding she was holding on to the words of Palparan’s lawyer, Jose Santos, who told a Bulacan court handling the abduction case that the two UP students were still alive.

“That only meant they knew something and were just keeping [Sherlyn] somewhere,” she said.

Gov’t cover-up

The labor group Kilusang Mayo Uno (KMU) said the arrest of Palparan was a cover-up for the Aquino administration’s coddling of criminal suspects.

“We have always believed that the Aquino administration coddled Palparan. Faced with [its] worst political crisis, it was forced to surface Palparan to score some brownie points from the people,” KMU said in a statement.

The group reiterated its call for justice for Cadapan, Empeño and the other “victims of Palparan,” including Jonas Burgos, Eden Marcellana and Eddie Gumanoy.

Edita Burgos, mother of Jonas Burgos, immediately called the mothers of Cadapan and Empeño after hearing the news of Palparan’s capture.

“I got a very early text from a friend about the arrest. The first thing I did was to call the mothers,” she said.

Hope for Burgos

“It was mixed emotions. We were cheering and we were all crying,” she said, recounting her phone conversations with Linda Cadapan and Concepcion Empeño.

Burgos said Palparan’s capture gave her fresh hope that her son’s abductors, suspected to be from the military, would likewise be brought to justice.

Jonas Burgos was abducted by armed men at a restaurant inside a shopping mall in Quezon City on April 27, 2007.

“I had doubted the sincerity of the authorities in finding him because it was a case of uniformed men looking for a fellow uniformed man. But this completely changes the picture,” Edita Burgos said, referring to Palparan’s capture.

She said the families of the disappeared took the news with both optimism and caution, explaining that their “measure of success” is the return of the two missing UP students.

“I am hopeful that they are still alive. Of course, as mothers, it would be hard to raise their hopes only to be dashed [if nothing happens]. We’re saying we should remain cautious and vigilant, continue praying. Let us not let our guard down,” she said.

Light on disappearances

The Asian Federation against Involuntary Disappearances (Afad) was as guarded even as it welcomed the news of Palparan’s capture.

“The much-awaited arrest of the notorious human rights violator Jovito Palparan is an initial triumph of the struggle of justice against impunity. Let this be a major step to ferreting out the truth about the enforced disappearances of Jonas Burgos, Sherlyn Cadapan, Karen Empeño and many others,” said Aileen Diez-Bacalso, Afad secretary general in a statement.

She said Palparan’s capture “should result in bringing light on the fate of those who disappeared under his command, the immediate surfacing of the victims and in ensuring that this crime would never be repeated.”

Bayan Muna Rep. Carlos Isagani Zarate said Palparan must be immediately prosecuted and the “full extent of the law” should be applied to him.

“His arrest should not be used mainly to score political points at the expense of the victims’ relatives who have been waiting for nearly four years to see Palparan behind bars,” Zarate said.–With reports from Maricar Cinco, Inquirer Southern Luzon; Carmela Reyes-Estrope and Tonette Orejas, Inquirer Central Luzon; and Karlos Manlupig, Inquirer Mindanao

5 things you need to know about Jovito Palparan   By Aries Joseph Hegina |INQUIRER.net2:37 pm | Tuesday, August 12th, 2014


Philippine Army Brigadier General Jovito Palparan (R), commander of the Filipino-Iraq contingent, congratulates policemen who were part of the small Philippine military contingent in Iraq during ceremony at the military headquarters in Manila 04 August 2004. AFP FILE PHOTO

MANILA, Philippines—Here are five things you need to know about retired Major General Jovito S. Palparan Jr., who was arrested by National Bureau of Investigation agents on Tuesday morning after three years in hiding:

1. Palparan is a decorated soldier and led various military units

Palparan was born on September 11, 1950 in Cagayan De Oro City. He has a wife and father of five children. He graduated with a degree of BS Business Administration in the University of the East and was commissioned to the Armed Forces of the Philippines in 1973.

He first served as a lieutenant in Basilan and Sulu and he later served as the Commanding Officer of the 24th Infantry Battalion, 8th Infantry Division in Eastern Samar and in the 7th Infantry Division in Mindoro.

He was awarded with the Gold Cross medal and the Gawad sa Kanluran medal, along with other military distinctions.


Retired Philippine Army general Jovito Palparan, swears in before he testify during a probe on political killings in Manila, 26 September 2006. AFP FILE PHOTO

2. He was labelled as “The Butcher” by human rights groups and political activists

Palparan was tagged as “The Butcher” because he was accused of being the chief architect of alleged torture and killing of political activists during his term in the military. According to human rights group Karapatan, during his stint as the Commanding Officer of the 7th ID in Mindoro, Karapatan listed 71 victims of extrajudicial killings, 14 victims of frustrated killing, and five incidents of massacre.

As early as 1991, he was implicated in various cases of torture and extrajudicial killings when he led the 24th Infantry Battalion (IB) in Central Luzon, according to Karapatan. In September 1991, about 100 townspeople from Sta. Cruz, Zambales were arrested, interrogated and forced to sign “affidavits of surrender” by elements of the 24th IB.

Karapatan also said that Palparan allegedly orchestrated the killing of human rights defenders Eden Marcellana and peasant leader Eddie Gumanoy in Southern Tagalog; UCCP Pastor Edison Lapuz, Leyte; Atty. Fedelito Dacut, Leyte; and Supreme Bishop Alberto Ramento of the Iglesia Filipina Independiente.

3. Palparan served as a congressman in the House of Representatives

Three years after he retired from the service on September 11, 2006, Palparan ran and won a seat in the 14th Congress as the representative of the party-list group The True Marcos Loyalist (For God, Country and People) Association of the Philippines, or Bantay in short. Bantay party-list, according to its Facebook page, is “a group of pro-democracy advocates committed to save Philippine Republic against communist terrorism.”

4. He was promoted and recognized by former President and now Pampanga Representative Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo

Palparan was said to be favored by the Arroyo administration as he was promoted twice during Arroyo’s term: in 2003, from colonel to brigadier general, and in 2004 from brigadier general to major general. He was also mentioned in Arroyo’s State of the Nation Address speech in 2006 when she praised Palparan for his efforts in the counter-insurgency campaign of the Arroyo administration.


Retired Major General Jovito Palparan. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

5. Palparan was credited for his “effective” counter-insurgency campaign in Samar in 2005

From February to September 2005, Palparan was the Commanding General of the 8th Infantry Division stationed in Eastern Samar. He claimed that he reduced rebel presence in the area by 80 percent.

However, Karapatan-Eastern Visayas documented 40 cases of evacuations in this island which affected 2,433 individuals or 1,786 families due to the alleged bombing of Palparan’s forces in an attempt to flush out suspected rebels in the area.

With this claim, former president Arroyo awarded Palparan a Distinguished Service Star medal in March 2006.
Sources: karapatan.org, bulatlat.com

FROM THE MANILA TIMES

‘I don’t want to be killed by communists’ August 12, 2014 11:33 pm
by JIM PILAPIL REPORTER AND JOEL SY EGCO SENIOR REPORTER


Retired general Jovito Palparan (center), listens to one of his lawyers during a press conference shortly after his arrest, at the National Bureau of Investigation (NBI) headquarters in Manila. AFP PHOTO

The “butcher” whom leftist activists feared the most and suspect of being the military brass behind many human rights violations perpetrated by security forces, including extrajudicial killings and disappearances, seeks to be protected from communists.

“I don’t want special treatment,” said captured fugitive Maj. Gen. (ret.) Jovito Palparan on Tuesday, “but the government must give me adequate security because I don’t want to be killed by ‘the enemy.’ “

By “the enemy” he meant the communist New People’s Army operatives whom he hunted down as an AFP officer until he retired.

He then entered politics, became a congressman, and fled when he was going to be arrested to face charges on two counts of kidnapping, serious illegal detention in connection with the disappearance of University of the Philippines students Sherlyn Cadapan and Karen Empeño.

Palparan became one of the most publicized wanted fugitives since he went into hiding in 2011.

Shortly after his arrest early on Tuesday, Palparan repeatedly said — to print, radio-TV reporters and news anchors interviewing him — that he did not wish to die in the hands of “the enemy.”

Palparan, gaunt, long haired and wearing a beard, did not resist arrest when agents of the National Bureau of Investigation (NBI) and intelligence agents of the Philippine Navy swooped down on the house in Barangay 626, Old Sta. Mesa, Manila, where he had been hiding since May.

* The retired general turned lawmaker was taken to the NBI headquarters for temporary detention while authorities waited for his commitment order from the courts.

Treated professionally

He said the arresting team had treated him professionally and that he was grateful his arrest had no untoward incidents.

“I feel secure here [at the NBI]. I don’t want special treatment. Or hospital arrest. I just don’t want to be killed by ‘the enemy’,” he said, explaining that he wanted to be kept secure because he did not want his family to be constantly worried about his safety.

He had already been given a shave when the NBI allowed him to face the media.

Although he had lost a lot of weight, Palparan, who spoke mostly in Tagalog to the reporters, claimed to be physically fit.

He admitted “having a heart problem that’s really nothing that I can’t deal with.” He spoke in English when he said, “my weight loss should be addressed.”

“He is just asking for security assurance,” Justice Secretary Leila de Lima said when asked if Palparan would be given special treatment.

“I should have surrendered a long time ago. But my family relayed a message that they were against it. They were afraid for my security. I know that if only the court would be impartial, I could win this case,” the former general said.

Palparan said he had tried and failed several times to reach former President, now Pampanga Rep., Gloria Arroyo.
“I had no contact with the outside world,” he said.

Palparan denied any involvement in the abduction of Cadapan and Empeño, saying the military was not in any way involved in their alleged kidnapping.

“Wala namang na-involve o nag-move na military at that time (there were no military movements at that time),” he said.

“Marami rin silang kalaban, nasagasaan . . . Basta, I’m sure walang na-involve na mga tao ko dun [they also had enemies, people they crossed.

I’m sure my men were not involved],” he added.

Palparan maintained that Cadapan and Empeño were not students but members of the NPA.

The former general was also implicated in the disappearance of activist Jonas Burgos, who was abducted on April 28, 2007 in an eatery in Quezon City.

Unlikely hiding place

Two other persons were arrested with Palparan yesterday— Reynaldo Ladao and Grace Roa. Ladao, believed to be a security guard of the Bantay Security Agency owned by the Palparan family, owns the house where the former general hid for months.

Justice Secretary de Lima said the NBI is readying charges against Ladao and Roa for harboring a fugitive.

Palparan said he never left Metro Manila since he went into hiding in 2011. He did not say where he stayed before moving to Ladao’s house, which is just two blocks away from the Polytechnic University of the Philippines (PUP), a university known to be the home ground of militant youth groups.

“I even saw [students] marching in front of the house where I was hiding,” he said.

He said he did not really disguise himself while he was moving around, even after the government offered a P2 million bounty for his head. His hair and beard grew because he could not afford to go to a barbershop for a trim.

Rommel Vallejo, head of the NBI’s Anti-Organized Crime Division, said his men scoured the provinces of Zambales, Pampanga and Bataan in their hunt for Palparan.

6 Responses to ‘I don’t want to be killed by communists’
E. Subijano says:
August 13, 2014 at 12:31 pm
Jovito Palparan has been a long embarrassment for the Philippine government – especially for the US-Aquino regime. During his heyday he was praised by Gloria Arroyo and also by his military peers during a Congressional session. That was before all the evidence against him and his criminal activities surfaced. Now he is a lowly criminal fugitive who is finally caught but still claiming innocence. He claims that his enemies (i.e., the communists) wants him dead. That may be true but his real enemy is the Filipino people – it is a true case of the People of the Philippines vs. Jovito Palparan. The US-Aquino regime has discarded him as an expandable asset and is now trying to wash its hands clean of him. But there are still a lot of Jovito Palparans in the AFP. It will remain so until we get rid of US imperialism.
Reply

Butch says:
August 13, 2014 at 10:06 am
What a pity, here is a soldier fighting a clandestine enemy, now you say his head is on the chopping block. What about those soldiers and innocent people killed by the enemy, are their heads going on the chopping board too? Human rights! Phewww. Who maimed and killed the politicians at plaza Mranda? never caught and the leader is living it up in the Netherlands. Poor soldiers and policemen, they have to follow rules of engagement, does the enemy do the same??? it’s always human against the law enforcer. It’s war a tooth for a tooth. political righteousness deserves the wastebasket.
Reply

arbi says:
August 13, 2014 at 10:01 am
Sorry Gen, you were not as clever and smart and as well connected as that other high profile fugitive Czar Sen Ping
Reply

Tobe says:
August 13, 2014 at 9:34 am
He said he did not really disguise himself while he was moving around, even after the government offered a P2 million bounty for his head…
This show how this man really know his craft, to think that “HIS ENEMY” for sure has a lot of bullet reserve for him.
But he is no doubt a lot better public servant than some corrupt government officials, both the elected ones and those in uniforms.
Reply

dustin says:
August 13, 2014 at 7:49 am
& already he is claiming his innocence yet he ran from the law. Its so strange in this country how all of the top people who commit crimes are never guilty. None have the courage or integrity to admit their crimes. I hope there is enough evidence to get this guy to trial, & i would tell him tell us the whole truth & if we find you are lying in anyway at all we will just put you in open jail where the left will have access to you. I for one dont care if they torture him before they kill him. In my eyes he is just pure scum. The sympathy i have is for those 2 young women who went missing, what about their families who mourn them did he ever for one second think of them, no never. I would also look for ways of punnishing his family who have been hiding him.
Now from what ive written i hope people dont think im a leftist as im not im a right winger. But i believe in treating people fairly. I believe in the right to free speech even if i dont like what they say. They still have the right to say it as long as it isnt harmful to others. Now palparan believes in free speech just so long as its what he wants to say.
Reply

Nestor Baylan says:
August 13, 2014 at 4:29 am
You can run but you can’t hide. The long arm of the finally caught up with him. The butcher will now put his head in the chopping block.The families of his victims will now have a sigh of relief.Let us give closure to those who died mercilessly in his bloody hands.

‘Butcher’ left trail of disappearances August 12, 2014 11:18 pm


Palparan hid at the second floor of this old wooden house along Teresa Street in Sta Mesa, Manila. PHOTO BY EDWIN MULI

Retired Maj. Gen. Jovito Palparan, the “Berdugo” (butcher), as he is known among activist groups, is blamed for hundreds of enforced disappearances and extrajudicial killings across the country.

Based on the fact sheet by human rights group Karapatan (Rights), the following incidents are blamed on Palparan:

• In 1991, 100 townspeople in Sta. Cruz, Zambales were arrested, interrogated, and forced to sign “affidavits of surrender” by soldiers of the 24th Infantry Division. Within six days, 10 families were forced to evacuate due to shelling operations. Palparan claimed that they were “rebel surrenderees.”

• The torture of Marcelo Fakila, a leader of the Cordillera Peoples’ Alliance in Mountain Province and village elder in Sagada, was said to have been committed by Palparan during his deployment to the Cordillera Administrative Region. In 1992 alone, six cases of illegal arrest, five cases of harassment, one case of disappearance, one summary execution, a case of wounding, and two cases of evacuations, were recorded during his assignment in the region.

• While Palparan was commander of Task Force Banahaw, which has jurisdiction over Rizal and Laguna, seven civilian killings were listed in 2001, including the death of a five-year-old.

* • In April 2002, Bayan Muna coordinator Expedito Albarillo was tied and dragged out of his hut in San Teodoro, Oriental Mindoro by nearly 10 soldiers. His wife Manuela begged the soldiers for mercy. Relatives heard guns fired from 200 meters away and rushed to the scene. They found the couple lying face down in a pool of blood.

• The following month, Bayan Muna leaders in the same town were also gunned down by soldiers. The victims were Ruben Apolinar, his wife Rodriga, and their adopted daughter, Niña Angela.

• On 28 May 2002, activist Edilberto Napoles Jr. was shot near the Bayan Muna office in Calapan City.

• A fact-finding mission was formed to look into the cases of Albarillo, Apolinar, and Napoles. This was led by Karapatan \o “Southern Tagalog” Southern Tagalog secretary general Eden Marcellana and peasant leader Eddie Gumanoy. They were reported to have been tortured and killed as well by the soldiers of the 204th Infantry Division. The killings in Oriental Mindoro recorded 326 human rights violations involving 1,219 individual victims.

• Within six months of Palparan’s assignment in Eastern Visayas, Karapatan had recorded 570 human rights violations involving 7,561 individuals, 1,773 families, 110 communities, and 10 organizations.

• 136 cases of human rights violations were recorded under Palparan’s command in Central Luzon from September 2005 to August 2006, including 71 summary executions, five massacres, 14 frustrated killings, and 46 enforced disappearances. (from WikiPilipinas

PHILSTAR EDITORIAL

EDITORIAL - ‘The Butcher’ falls (The Philippine Star) | Updated August 13, 2014 - 12:00am 2 3 googleplus0 0

Militant groups and relatives of two desaparecidos from the University of the Philippines are rejoicing over the arrest yesterday of retired Army Maj. Gen. Jovito Palparan. The man dubbed “The Butcher” for the numerous human rights violations in the areas where he served as military commander had been in hiding for three years.

Palparan was ordered arrested by the Bulacan Regional Trial Court for the kidnapping and serious illegal detention of UP students Sherilyn Cadapan and Karen Empeño in Bulacan in 2006. The two students, now among the Philippines’ “disappeared,” were reportedly taken and tortured by members of the Army’s 7th Infantry Division based in Central Luzon.

With Palparan’s arrest, three things are expected from the government. One is to prevent his escape. While on the run, Palparan was believed to have been harbored by sympathetic elements in the military. Those elements can still spring him from detention and save him from a possible life term.

* Second is to bring to justice other military personnel who carried out Palparan’s orders and violated human rights, particularly in the case of Cadapan and Empeño. Impunity arises from the failure to bring lawbreakers to justice.

Third is to intensify efforts to discourage members of the Armed Forces of the Philippines from resorting to extrajudicial methods of carrying out their tasks. Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo, who praised Palparan in one of her State of the Nation Addresses, was not alone in thinking that he deserved public praise for his brand of service to the nation. There are military officers who believe their organization needs men like Palparan in battling enemies of the state. Before becoming a fugitive, Palparan also became a member of the House of Representatives after his Bantay party-list group, with him as first nominee, won a seat in Congress.

Considering the number of like-minded men elected to public office, it is clear that there are Filipinos who approve of Palparan’s methods, in both the military and police. Such people change their attitude only when someone dear to them becomes a victim of officers who think like Palparan. That possibility is always present as long as no change is introduced into the culture that allowed The Butcher to thrive.


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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