KRIS AQUINO TO PRESIDENT BENIGNO AQUINO III: THE SILENT MAJORITY STILL BELIEVES IN YOU  

PHOTO: IN LIFE OR DEATH FONDLY REMEMBERED In this composite photo, former President Corazon Aquino stands tall on the beach of Boracay in this 1992 shot (left). Cory, who died of colon cancer on Aug. 1, 2009, was fondly remembered on her fifth death anniversary yesterday during a Mass celebrated at her tomb at Manila Memorial Park in Sucat, Parañaque City. On the fifth death anniversary of former President Corazon Aquino on Friday, her youngest daughter Kris Aquino turned emotional as she asked for support and prayers for President Benigno Aquino III who, the celebrity host said, was “doing a good job” running the country. Mr. Aquino and sisters Kris, Ballsy Aquino-Cruz and Viel Aquino-Dee, joined family and friends in a Mass celebrating the life and legacy of the former President who lies interred at Manila Memorial Park in Parañaque City beside her husband, opposition leader Sen. Benigno “Ninoy” Aquino Jr. Cory Aquino died of colon cancer on Aug. 1, 2009. “All of us who love and support Noy should be there with him not only in those moments [when] he is being criticized but, more importantly, [also] in the moments [when] he is doing good,” Kris said to applause from her family, including son Josh, and other guests.
“I can tell Noy now that the great majority of people still believe in him; they know what a good job he is doing. But the problem is that his supporters and believers choose to remain silent about their observations,” said the youngest of President Aquino’s four sisters.* READ MORE...

ALSO: PNoy likens allies to ordinary Filipino workers during Sona 2014 

President Benigno Aquino III in his fifth State of the Nation Address likened his allies to ordinary Filipino workers for their help in the relief and reconstruction efforts after super typhoon “Yolanda” (international name: Haiyan). Aquino called Social Welfare Secretary Dinky Soliman as the country’s relief worker, Labor Secretary Rosalinda Baldoz as the call center agent, and trasportation secretary Jun Abaya as a dispatcher. He also thanked Interior Secretary Mar Roxas and Defense Secretary Voltaire Gazmin for giving the “marching orders.” “Yolanda” flattened coastal towns as the weather disturbance, said to be the world’s strongest typhoon to hit land, claimed over 6,000 lives. THIS IS THE FULL REPORT.

ALSO: Kris Aquino wears yellow to counter Noynoy’s bashers

IMAGE: Screengrab from Kris Aquino’s instagram account. Wonder why Kris Aquino consistently wears yellow on television lately? That’s to counter some media outfits’ biases against her brother, President Benigno Aquino III. After the first family went to a mass on Friday to remember their late matriarch Corazon “Cory” Cojuangco Aquino on her fifth death anniversary, the host-actress took a jab at the critics of the President, particularly those in the media. “Kitang-kita namin iyong bias. Kulay noong kabila (opposition) blatantly suot noong lahat ng mga nagre-report. So I told my ate, ‘ate mas marami naman akong airtime sa kanila, starting today magdidilaw talaga ako,” she said. Calls mount to impeach President Aquino over the Disbursement Acceleration Program, which was declared as unconstitutional by the Supreme Court. This also explains why it’s raining yellow posts on Kris Aquino’s Instagram account (@lovekrisaquino). And for each of her follower who praises President Aquino on Instagram, he or she gets a bonus: Kris’ reply to their comment.* READ MORE...

ALSO: Aquino says critics are against beneficiaries of his administration 

President Benigno Aquino III chastised his critics in his fifth State of the Nation Address (Sona), saying they are against those who benefited in his platform of good governance.
Aquino said if his critics are against him, they are also against the informal settlers who benefited in the relocation programs, the Muslims who will benefit in the peace accord, students who benefited in the the courses offered by the Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (Tesda), and victims of storms who were rescued from harm.
In Congress, militant solons endorsed three impeachment complaints against Aquino over the partly unconstitutional Disbursement Acceleration Program and the Enhanced Defense Cooperation Agreement.
“Kontra rin po sila sa inyo… Patuloy pa rin ang kontra sa pagbabago (They are against you…They are against reforms),” Aquino said.

ALSO: PNoy believes that a change in attitude toward govt is one of his biggest achievements - Lacierda

Marking his fourth year in office on Monday, President Benigno Aquino III believes that a change in attitude toward government is one of his biggest achievements, according to a Malacañang official. Elected to office by 15 million Filipinos saddened by his mother’s recent death, Mr. Aquino took his oath as the country’s 15th President on June 30, 2010. “The President has been asked that question. For him, the change in attitude is a big deal,” presidential spokesperson Edwin Lacierda told state-run dzRB radio. From the apathy that he said marked the years before Mr. Aquino took over from the Arroyo administration in 2010, Lacierda claimed Filipinos had become more hopeful during the past four years. “Now, it’s possible for them to believe that everything is possible, anything is possible. We’ve seen the change in our countrymen,” he said. There has been a “rising appreciation” for government, he said.
According to Lacierda, the President would focus on making economic growth more inclusive in the last two years of his term.

“Our advocacy, our belief is that we would like to have inclusive growth for all, and so, we would like to make sure that as we leave—as the President leaves after 2016—he has laid the foundation for an economy that will provide equitable growth for all,” he said. “What we want to instill in our countrymen is that ‘let’s not go back anymore to where we were before.’ We have elevated the level of governance. People expect better from the government,” he said. Still, Malacañang is leaving it to historians and political analysts to judge Mr. Aquino’s legacy, Lacierda said.
“History, I believe, will judge what would be the President’s biggest achievement. In the meantime, we still have two more years to go, and every year there will always be achievements and it will be up to the historians and the political analysts to decide for themselves what would be the single biggest achievement of this administration,” he said. * READ MORE...

ALSO Inquirer opinion: 'Boss' 

It was P-Noy who originated the concept and used it to powerful effect over the years. That is the “Boss,” the ultimate ruler of this country to whom even presidents bow down and serve. P-Noy unveiled the word during his inauguration in 2010, and all the circumstances conspired to make it a brilliant idea. His inauguration was a transition from past to present, or indeed from a sordid past to a promising future, to be marked by the symbolic ritual of the transfer of power at the Luneta. P-Noy highlighted the drama of the event even before he stepped into Rizal’s favorite place. He did so by being driven to it without a fleet of cars leading, trailing and flanking him. He did so by stopping at every red light they came up to along the way. And, a thing that never happened during his predecessor’s time, he did so by not tearing out a path before him with blaring sirens.

At the end of his inauguration speech, P-Noy spoke about a new order, a new way of life, a new style of governance. One that would banish the wang-wang forever. That image resonated with worlds of meaning, the proposed silence of the wang-wang unleashing a roar in the mind. Henceforth, he concluded, the country was going to have a new sheriff, and that wasn’t the one of Nottingham. Or, as he explicitly said, the country was going to have a new master, a new governor, to whom he himself had to report, from whom he himself had to get orders. That was Juan de la Cruz, that was the people, that was the Boss. In the years that followed, P-Noy’s State of the Nation Address drew its power from that proposition. He made of them an occasion not just to apprise the nation of its state but also to make a report to the Boss. The Boss took on an aspect of solidity in the people’s mind, a palpable entity hearing him out, particularly as he ticked off the things he had done for him, or her, or them.

That was what made the people listen to P-Noy’s Sonas, notwithstanding that they have gotten longer and longer over the years, notwithstanding that the enumeration, the singling out of his officials whom he deemed to have done well, the testaments of the beneficiaries of uplift, have gotten longer and longer. You need no further proof of that than that everyone, from the media, mainstream and social, to the barbershops, old and new, would be weighing in on the President’s report, debating its merits and demerits for days to come. Indeed, you need no further proof than that P-Noy’s predecessor’s Sonas, despite their enumeration of accomplishments, too, despite their singling out of the presumably meritorious, too, despite their attestations to uplift, too—the “bangkang papel” comes to mind—were largely ignored the next day. Quite apart from the not very small matter of credibility, Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo’s Sonas lacked the “dramatic conceit” of a president talking to someone, who is his Boss. There’s an upside and downside to this....* READ MORE... [OPINION ENDS WITH: The question, though, and quite an elemental one, is: Who really are the people? Who really is the Boss?]


READ FULL REPORT HERE:

Kris Aquino to President Benigno III: The silent majority still believes in you


I
N LIFE OR DEATH FONDLY REMEMBERED In this composite photo, former President Corazon Aquino stands tall on the beach of Boracay in this 1992 shot (left). Cory, who died of colon cancer on Aug. 1, 2009, was fondly remembered on her fifth death anniversary yesterday during a Mass celebrated at her tomb at Manila Memorial Park in Sucat, Parañaque City. VAL RODRIGUEZ PHOTO FROM MARGIE JUICO COLLECTION / JOAN BONDOC

MANILA, AUGUST 4, 2014 (INQUIRER) By Maricar B. Brizuela and Nikko Dizon - On the fifth death anniversary of former President Corazon Aquino on Friday, her youngest daughter Kris Aquino turned emotional as she asked for support and prayers for President Benigno Aquino III who, the celebrity host said, was “doing a good job” running the country.

Mr. Aquino and sisters Kris, Ballsy Aquino-Cruz and Viel Aquino-Dee, joined family and friends in a Mass celebrating the life and legacy of the former President who lies interred at Manila Memorial Park in Parañaque City beside her husband, opposition leader Sen. Benigno “Ninoy” Aquino Jr.

Cory Aquino died of colon cancer on Aug. 1, 2009.

“All of us who love and support Noy should be there with him not only in those moments [when] he is being criticized but, more importantly, [also] in the moments [when] he is doing good,” Kris said to applause from her family, including son Josh, and other guests.

“I can tell Noy now that the great majority of people still believe in him; they know what a good job he is doing. But the problem is that his supporters and believers choose to remain silent about their observations,” said the youngest of President Aquino’s four sisters.

* Not complacent

It was after President Aquino’s State of the Nation Address (Sona) last Monday when the whole family realized that “we should not be complacent,” added Kris, who said she had volunteered to deliver the message on her mother’s fifth death anniversary on behalf of the Aquino family.

Asked by Fr. Catalino Arevalo to give his own message, President Aquino declined but joined his sisters in lighting candles on their mother’s grave and in singing “Bayan Ko” at the end of the Mass.

Arevalo, who gave the homily during the Mass, said Cory and Ninoy were with the Filipino people in praying for the country and for President Aquino who, he said, needed guidance, courage and peace of heart.

“Tita Cory’s death was not a sign of defeat or loss but a sign of anticipation and hope,” the priest said, adding that the sense of hope came with the election to the presidency of Cory’s son, then Sen. Benigno Aquino III.

The groundswell of support for former President Cory Aquino after her death in 2009 inspired the so-called “Yellow Army” to urge her only son to seek the presidency in the 2010 elections, which Mr. Aquino won by a landslide.

Kris said she would wear yellow for most of her television appearances to show support for her brother.

‘Silent protest’

“Two and a half weeks ago while watching the news, I saw the bias when those reporting the news wore the color of the people going against my brother,” Kris said, referring to the “red and black” protest at the Supreme Court that had employees wearing red or black shirts as a silent protest against the President’s remarks on the Disbursement Acceleration Program, which the high court had declared unconstitutional.

“After that, I told my sisters that I would start wearing yellow,” the TV host and actress added.

Kris said that on social media, she also responded to people who had something good to say about the President while blocking those who were “nega” (negative). But, she added, very few people comprised the latter.

Aside from strength, Kris said she was also praying for her brother’s “good health, courage and the fortitude to last.”

Turned emotional

When it was her mother leading the country, “we saw that no matter what, she could handle it,” Kris said.

“But it is really different when it is your brother because you feel different and you want to do everything you want to help him out,” she added, turning emotional.

She broke the moment, however, and said she didn’t mind paying very expensive quarterly taxes because she knows that the money will be spent by responsible people.

“I just want all of you to join me because every night, my kids and I have a simple prayer and that is for God to guide Noy, give him strength, help him [and] give him inspiration, and for all his supporters to make him feel that they are there for him every day,” Kris said.

Fight vs dictatorship

Malacañang, meanwhile, urged the public to follow the “virtues” of the late President by continuing the collective work of strengthening the country’s democracy.

“As we look back on President Cory’s celebrated life, let us remember the virtues for which she [was] best known and which had endeared her to the public—the courage with which she adopted the fight for democracy; the humility which she maintained throughout her presidency and the compassion with which she considered the needs of all Filipinos,” presidential spokesperson Edwin Lacierda said in a statement yesterday.

Lacierda recalled how Cory Aquino “took up the country’s fight against dictatorship” after her husband’s death.

“In the years leading up to the 1986 Edsa Revolution, President Cory embodied the country’s struggle for freedom—a struggle that continued during her presidency as she sought to undo the mistakes of the past and establish safeguards to ensure that the country never falls under a dictatorship again,” Lacierda said.

“This is the legacy she left us with, a legacy that marks not only the pages of our history but also our collective memory. In gratitude for her contributions, let us seek to emulate these virtues as we continue her work of establishing a stronger, even more vibrant democracy,” Lacierda added.

‘True icon of democracy’

He added that Cory Aquino was a “true icon of democracy not just in name but [also] in action.”

After her six-year term from 1992 to 1998, “Citizen Cory,” as she called herself, continued to support various social projects and charitable institutions.

“Five years after her death, we still see clearly how her life proves that the Filipino is worth living for,” Lacierda said.
In his Sona last Monday, President Aquino became emotional as he recalled his parents’ legacy amid a difficult year in his own presidency.

In his speech, Mr. Aquino echoed his father’s words, “the Filipino is worth dying for,” and his mother’s, “the Filipino is worth living for,” before adding his own, “the Filipino is worth fighting for.”

Aquino likens allies to ordinary Filipino workers during Sona 2014  By Marc Jayson Cayabyab |INQUIRER.net5:00 pm | Monday, July 28th, 2014


Melvin Castro volunteers in the construction of housing units at a relocation site og GMA Kapuso Foundation in partnership with NHA and Tacloban City Government at Barangay Sto. Nino, Tacloban City for victims of super typhoon Yolanda. Castro and his family will be one of the beneficiaries of the housing units after super typhoon Yolanda destroyed their house in Barangay 88, San Jose, Tacloban City. INQUIRER FILE PHOTO/RAFFY LERMA

MANILA, Philippines–President Benigno Aquino III in his fifth State of the Nation Address likened his allies to ordinary Filipino workers for their help in the relief and reconstruction efforts after super typhoon “Yolanda” (international name: Haiyan).

Aquino called Social Welfare Secretary Dinky Soliman as the country’s relief worker, Labor Secretary Rosalinda Baldoz as the call center agent, and trasportation secretary Jun Abaya as a dispatcher.

He also thanked Interior Secretary Mar Roxas and Defense Secretary Voltaire Gazmin for giving the “marching orders.”
“Yolanda” flattened coastal towns as the weather disturbance, said to be the world’s strongest typhoon to hit land, claimed over 6,000 lives.

Kris Aquino wears yellow to counter Noynoy’s bashers  By Julliane Love de Jesus | INQUIRER.netAugust 2, 2014 | 12:20 am


Screengrab from Kris Aquino’s instagram account

MANILA, Philippines— Wonder why Kris Aquino consistently wears yellow on television lately? That’s to counter some media outfits’ biases against her brother, President Benigno Aquino III.

After the first family went to a mass on Friday to remember their late matriarch Corazon “Cory” Cojuangco Aquino on her fifth death anniversary, the host-actress took a jab at the critics of the President, particularly those in the media.

“Kitang-kita namin iyong bias. Kulay noong kabila (opposition) blatantly suot noong lahat ng mga nagre-report. So I told my ate, ‘ate mas marami naman akong airtime sa kanila, starting today magdidilaw talaga ako,” she said.

Calls mount to impeach President Aquino over the Disbursement Acceleration Program, which was declared as unconstitutional by the Supreme Court.

This also explains why it’s raining yellow posts on Kris Aquino’s Instagram account (@lovekrisaquino).

And for each of her follower who praises President Aquino on Instagram, he or she gets a bonus: Kris’ reply to their comment.

* But if the follower bashes the President, Kris said, she blocks them on the photo-sharing site.

“I have a lot of social networking followers and everyone who says good things about him, they get a bonus because I reply to them. Siyempre iyong mga nega binoblock ko na lang. Pero konting-konti lang sila (Of course those who post negative comments, I block them. But they are only few),” she said.

“I shared that with my sisters and I guess I can tell that to Noy now that the great majority of our people still really believe in him. They know what the good job he is doing. Ang problema lang iyong mga bilib tumatahimik (But the problem is, his supporters just remain silent),” she added.

Aquino says critics against beneficiaries of his administration
By Marc Jayson Cayabyab |INQUIRER.net5:39 pm | Monday, July 28th, 2014


President Benigno Aquino lll

MANILA, Philippines–President Benigno Aquino III chastised his critics in his fifth State of the Nation Address (Sona), saying they are against those who benefited in his platform of good governance.

Aquino said if his critics are against him, they are also against the informal settlers who benefited in the relocation programs, the Muslims who will benefit in the peace accord, students who benefited in the the courses offered by the Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (Tesda), and victims of storms who were rescued from harm.

In Congress, militant solons endorsed three impeachment complaints against Aquino over the partly unconstitutional Disbursement Acceleration Program and the Enhanced Defense Cooperation Agreement.

“Kontra rin po sila sa inyo… Patuloy pa rin ang kontra sa pagbabago (They are against you…They are against reforms),” Aquino said.

PNoy believes that a change in attitude toward government is one of his biggest achievements - Lacierda By TJ Burgonio |Philippine Daily Inquirer1:27 am | Sunday, June 29th, 2014

Focus on inclusive growth


President Benigno S. Aquino III. INQUIRER FILE PHOTO

Marking his fourth year in office on Monday, President Benigno Aquino III believes that a change in attitude toward government is one of his biggest achievements, according to a Malacañang official.

Elected to office by 15 million Filipinos saddened by his mother’s recent death, Mr. Aquino took his oath as the country’s 15th President on June 30, 2010.

“The President has been asked that question. For him, the change in attitude is a big deal,” presidential spokesperson Edwin Lacierda told state-run dzRB radio.

From the apathy that he said marked the years before Mr. Aquino took over from the Arroyo administration in 2010, Lacierda claimed Filipinos had become more hopeful during the past four years.

“Now, it’s possible for them to believe that everything is possible, anything is possible. We’ve seen the change in our countrymen,” he said. There has been a “rising appreciation” for government, he said.

According to Lacierda, the President would focus on making economic growth more inclusive in the last two years of his term.

“Our advocacy, our belief is that we would like to have inclusive growth for all, and so, we would like to make sure that as we leave—as the President leaves after 2016—he has laid the foundation for an economy that will provide equitable growth for all,” he said.

“What we want to instill in our countrymen is that ‘let’s not go back anymore to where we were before.’ We have elevated the level of governance. People expect better from the government,” he said.

Still, Malacañang is leaving it to historians and political analysts to judge Mr. Aquino’s legacy, Lacierda said.

“History, I believe, will judge what would be the President’s biggest achievement. In the meantime, we still have two more years to go, and every year there will always be achievements and it will be up to the historians and the political analysts to decide for themselves what would be the single biggest achievement of this administration,” he said.

* Lacierda was not that forthcoming about what accomplishments of the past 12 months the President would be reporting in his fourth State of the Nation Address on July 28.

“Let’s just wait for his State of the Nation Address,” he said.

But based on what issues daily out of the Malacañang public affairs and communications mill in the past year, people can make out the bare bones of what the President will likely claim in his report on July 28.

Pork barrel scam
Mr. Aquino last year ordered the abolition of the pork barrel Priority Development Assistance Fund (PDAF) in the 2014 national budget following the discovery of the scandalous misuse and theft of P10 billion in rural development funds.

Senators Bong Revilla, Jinggoy Estrada and Juan Ponce Enrile, the alleged pork barrel scam mastermind Janet Lim-Napoles and several officials have been indicted for plunder and graft over the scam.

The President also presided over the signing of a peace agreement with Moro rebels that will see the creation of a new, autonomous Bangsamoro region in southern Philippines, drawing international praise.

But Mr. Aquino has not been spared criticism over disclosures that the executive department suspiciously distributed additional pork barrel funds to senators under the questionable Disbursement Acceleration Program soon after the Senate convicted ousted Chief Justice Renato Corona in May 2012 for dishonesty in the disclosure of his assets.

Boss By Conrado de Quiros |Philippine Daily Inquirer1:41 am | Thursday, July 31st, 2014


By Conrado de Quiros

It was P-Noy who originated the concept and used it to powerful effect over the years. That is the “Boss,” the ultimate ruler of this country to whom even presidents bow down and serve.

P-Noy unveiled the word during his inauguration in 2010, and all the circumstances conspired to make it a brilliant idea. His inauguration was a transition from past to present, or indeed from a sordid past to a promising future, to be marked by the symbolic ritual of the transfer of power at the Luneta.

P-Noy highlighted the drama of the event even before he stepped into Rizal’s favorite place. He did so by being driven to it without a fleet of cars leading, trailing and flanking him. He did so by stopping at every red light they came up to along the way. And, a thing that never happened during his predecessor’s time, he did so by not tearing out a path before him with blaring sirens.

At the end of his inauguration speech, P-Noy spoke about a new order, a new way of life, a new style of governance. One that would banish the wang-wang forever. That image resonated with worlds of meaning, the proposed silence of the wang-wang unleashing a roar in the mind.

Henceforth, he concluded, the country was going to have a new sheriff, and that wasn’t the one of Nottingham.

Or, as he explicitly said, the country was going to have a new master, a new governor, to whom he himself had to report, from whom he himself had to get orders. That was Juan de la Cruz, that was the people, that was the Boss.

In the years that followed, P-Noy’s State of the Nation Address drew its power from that proposition. He made of them an occasion not just to apprise the nation of its state but also to make a report to the Boss. The Boss took on an aspect of solidity in the people’s mind, a palpable entity hearing him out, particularly as he ticked off the things he had done for him, or her, or them.

That was what made the people listen to P-Noy’s Sonas, notwithstanding that they have gotten longer and longer over the years, notwithstanding that the enumeration, the singling out of his officials whom he deemed to have done well, the testaments of the beneficiaries of uplift, have gotten longer and longer. You need no further proof of that than that everyone, from the media, mainstream and social, to the barbershops, old and new, would be weighing in on the President’s report, debating its merits and demerits for days to come.

Indeed, you need no further proof than that P-Noy’s predecessor’s Sonas, despite their enumeration of accomplishments, too, despite their singling out of the presumably meritorious, too, despite their attestations to uplift, too—the “bangkang papel” comes to mind—were largely ignored the next day. Quite apart from the not very small matter of credibility, Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo’s Sonas lacked the “dramatic conceit” of a president talking to someone, who is his Boss.

There’s an upside and downside to this.

* The upside is patent. P-Noy’s “internalization” of talking to his Boss gives the impression of a leader who truly means to do well by his people. An impression reinforced by P-Noy personally never having been tainted by corruption.

Indeed, by P-Noy personally not being weighed down by self-interest: He was loath to run from the start, but which, as he said last Monday, would have been like turning his back on his parents. He has no desire to cling to power but will walk away quietly after his term ends.

Of course, that also calls attention to the fact that his people won’t, but will seek another six years of power. But no matter, P-Noy’s own light is strong enough to cast it at least for the nonce in the shadows.

The downside is not as patent, but is there. That is that if you call the Boss the Boss, then you must not just be talking to him, you must also be listening to him. You must also be receiving orders from him. You must also be doing his bidding. You may not presume to know what the Boss wants. Or worse, you may not presume to know what’s best for your Boss. In short, the conversation must be two-way. In short, the dialogue may not be a monologue.

P-Noy has always been strong about reporting to his Boss what he has done; there is no doubt about his sincerity. He has not always been strong about knowing what the Boss wants; there is every doubt about his willingness to do so.

You saw that last year in his reluctance, if not hostility, to dialogue with the antipork people who managed to mount a Million People March at the Luneta.

Doubtless the leftists were there, doubtless the Arroyo people were there (Renato Corona was there), doubtless those who feared the ax falling on them in the wake of the Janet Napoles scandal were there.

But so were the nuns, the priests, the teachers, the students, the housewives, the ordinary folk who were beside themselves with rage at the criminal waste of their money.

You saw that as well in his reluctance, if not hostility, to listen to the people arguing for the passage of the freedom of information bills.

You saw that as well in his reluctance, if not hostility, to dialogue with the netizens not all of whom are kulang sa pansin and just want to shout themselves hoarse, many are perfectly capable of expressing thoughtful thoughts.

Toward the end of his Sona last Monday, P-Noy sounded a note of warning at his detractors. He sounded a note of resolve at those who mean to thwart reform, at those who mean to derail transformation, at those who mean to stop change.

They will not succeed. They will find themselves on the other side of government, they will find themselves on the other side of the people, and they will find themselves crushed.

The question, though, and quite an elemental one, is: Who really are the people? Who really is the Boss?


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

© Copyright, 2014 by PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE
All rights reserved


PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE [PHNO] WEBSITE