GRILLED BY STUDENTS: FOR FIRST TIME, NOY APOLOGIZES FOR SLOW GOVT RESPONSE TO YOLANDA VICTIMS

For the first time since Typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan) struck the country four months ago, President Benigno Aquino III apologized to the affected residents because the government was not able to come to their aid sooner. The President made the apology during an open forum at the Hope Christian High School in Manila on Thursday, March 13. For the first time since super typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan) struck the country four months ago, President Benigno Aquino III apologized to those affected because the government was not able to come to their aid sooner. "I apologize if we couldn't act even faster," Aquino said during an open forum at the Hope Christian High School in Manila. Aquino's remark, a rare apology for his administration's performance, came after a student named Zar Agustin Yu, originally from Sacred Heart High School in Tacloban City, asked him why the government took three days to reach them. Yu is one of the almost 200 students from Tacloban now studying at Hope Christian High School. Aquino visited the school after he received letters from some students expressing their concern for victims of calamities.

ALSO: Bishops: Noy’s ‘Yolanda’ apology good but restitution needed

Catholic bishops were not convinced with the belated apology of President Aquino to typhoon “Yolanda” victims for the government’s ineffective relief efforts as they said the acknowledgement of his administration’s shortcomings must be accompanied with restitution. The hoped for government make-up action is not forthcoming based on the results of a recent meeting of the typhoon victims with Social Welfare Secretary Dinky Soliman who told officers of People Surge, an alliance of Yolanda survivors, that they should have been in the Visayas and not protesting in Manila. The officers of People Surge, led by its chairwoman Benedictine nun Edita Eslopor, had travelled to Manila last month to bring to the national government’s attention “the real situation in Eastern Visayas” after Yolanda. Their dialog was held last Wednesday and lasted for an hour and their discussions centered on the Department of Social Welfare and Development’s (DSWD) announcement that it would stop distributing relief materials by the end of this month. The group said the government’s relief distribution has been very slow and has failed to reach many underserved villages, including those near the highway in Leyte. Aquino grilled by students of Hope Christian High School in Sta. Cruz, Manila last Thursday on the poor response of government to the tragedy caused by typhoon Yolanda admitted government mistakes but laid most of the blame to local government officials in Tacloban City which was hit hardest by the typhoon. Tacloban City’s governor is Alfred Romualdez, a political opponent.

'ONE BOHOL': Bohol shakes off dust of tragedy

It has been five months since a 7.2-magnitude earthquake shattered Bohol’s centuries-old churches, toppled infrastructure, and traumatized the province’s 1.3 million inhabitants with 4,600 aftershocks. The October 15, 2013 quake had claimed 210 lives, injured more than 750 persons, rendered about 80,000 families homeless, and displaced almost a third of the province’s population. The quake has been considered as the worst of its kind to hit Bohol in half a millennium. The basis for saying this is that: If the stone churches in Baclayon and Loboc towns stood intact for the last 400 years until last year, then it may be accurate to say that no ground-shaking as devastating as the October 15 tremor had rocked Bohol during the churches’ 400-year lifespan. Despite the damage, estimated to be worth P6 billion, Boholanos have remained unflinching in their will to live as they shake off the dust of tragedy. In a Christmas message last year, President Aquino said: “In Bohol, (the people) were down in the disaster, but I myself witnessed: Truly, they were rising, they were fighting.” Bohol Gov. Edgar M. Chatto urged in his February 7 State of the Province Address (SOPA) to work together in restoring the province to its pre-quake status.

ALSO: Philstar's Damayan starts to build schools in Samar, Leyte

Determined to restore hope where there once was utter devastation, The Philippine STAR’s
humanitarian arm, Operation Damayan, has headed back to areas struck by Super Typhoon Yolanda in Central Visayas to provide further assistance to communities that have been badly affected by the disaster. This fulfills Damayan’s commitment to assist in rehabilitation efforts in these areas. When the team of Operation Damayan visited Samar and Leyte days after Yolanda struck last year, residents were understandably on the verge of despair, their patience wearing thin as their homes and schools were reduced to rubble. They were thankful for help coming their way in the form of relief goods to help tide them over the difficult times. Soon after, Operation Damayan returned to Tacloban, Samar and Leyte to distribute toys and school supplies to students in various schools in time for the New Year. The gift-giving was symbolic of a new beginning for residents of disaster-stricken areas where Operation Damayan had committed to undertake school projects in time for the coming school year. Today, with the help of generous donations from readers of The Philippine STAR, Operation Damayan has commenced the construction of three school buildings in Ormoc and Palo, Leyte; and Marabut, Samar under the aegis of its adopt-a-school program. The project is the biggest to be undertaken by Operation Damayan thus far.


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After 4 months, PNoy apologizes for slow govt response to Yolanda victims


For the first time since Typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan) struck the country four months ago, President Benigno Aquino III apologized to the affected residents because the government was not able to come to their aid sooner. The President made the apology during an open forum at the Hope Christian High School in Manila on Thursday, March 13. At right is DSWD Sec. Dinky Soliman. Rey Baniquet

MANILA, MARCH 17, 2014 (GMA NEWS NETWORK)  By KIMBERLY JANE TAN, GMA News - For the first time since Typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan) struck the country four months ago, President Benigno Aquino III apologized to the affected residents because the government was not able to come to their aid sooner.

The President made the apology during an open forum at the Hope Christian High School in Manila on Thursday, March 13. At right is DSWD Sec. Dinky Soliman. Rey Baniquet (Updated 3:25 p.m.) For the first time since super typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan) struck the country four months ago, President Benigno Aquino III apologized to those affected because the government was not able to come to their aid sooner.

"I apologize if we couldn't act even faster," Aquino said during an open forum at the Hope Christian High School in Manila.

Aquino's remark, a rare apology for his administration's performance, came after a student named Zar Agustin Yu, originally from Sacred Heart High School in Tacloban City, asked him why the government took three days to reach them.

Yu is one of the almost 200 students from Tacloban now studying at Hope Christian High School. Aquino visited the school after he received letters from some students expressing their concern for victims of calamities.

The President explained it shouldn't have taken them days to respond but that the extent of the damage caused by Yolanda was unprecedented, with four million families and 44 out of 81 provinces affected.

"[The] magnitude is I think is unprecedented in our history and if I am not mistaken, this is the biggest storm to make landfall anywhere in the world," he said.

He said Interior Sec. Mar Roxas and Defense Sec. Voltaire Gazmin were already in Tacloban to prepare for the landfall but that they lost touch with them immediately after the typhoon struck.

"Everything was down... cellphones, et cetera.... Even the equipment whether it's heavy equipment, whether it's trucks, whether it was police vehicles, what have you, were also hit," he said.

Aquino also said the airport, terminal, and runway were all hit hard by Yolanda.

"Leyte is an island. We will have to either get to the sea ports or the airport and the airport is the fastest. The airport itself was heavily damaged. So you had to clear that before we could bring in the aircraft," he said.

Non-existent LGU?

Another mistake, he said, was that they thought they would be able to rely on the local government units from the start.

"We have to rely on the local government unit to provide the backbone. They will tell us who is in need, where, what is needed and 'di ba parang even just knowing who the people we will have to work with. [But] that was not existent Sunday, Saturday," he said.

"Two hundred ninety policemen were supposed to be in Tacloban City alone. They actually had 20 on duty. Everybody else attended to something else. They are all being investigated. We [had] to bring in soldiers and policemen from other areas," he added.

While visiting Leyte in November, Aquino said LGUs have to admit that "there was a breakdown in terms of government and there was a cascading effect."

He said that if Tacloban is compared to towns like Palo, there appears to be a big difference in how it dealt with Yolanda.

Tacloban's current mayor, Alfred Romualdez, is a scion of the Romualdez-Marcos political family. His aunt, Ilocos Norte Rep. Imelda Marcos, is the widow of the late President Ferdinand Marcos, a political rival of Aquino's father, slain senator Benigno "Ninoy" Aquino Jr.

But Malacañang had already denied that they were blaming anyone for the extent of the damage caused by Yolanda.

Weeks later, however, Aquino ordered an investigation into the “extraordinarily high” number of casualties in certain Yolanda-hit areas in the Visayas.

The President, meanwhile, defended his decision to go back to Manila even though he said he would not leave Tacloban until the situation there is "okay."

"Before I left Tacloban, I really believe that everything that could be done was done or was being done already," he said, adding there were certain things he could not manage from there.

Despite this, Aquino said he believes that the government "did everything that could be done."

"We were given assurances that later on we are not correct, that things were already moving. So if I had known that it would not happen then perhaps I would have waited until they started constructing the first bunkhouse amongst other things or pati na rin iyong cadaver recovery and so many other things," he said.

Casualties, damage from Yolanda

The NDRRMC said the death toll due to Yolanda has reached 6,245 as of March 6.

On the other hand, 28,626 were injured and 1,039 are still missing.

It also said 890,895 families or 4,095,280 persons were displaced and served inside and outside evacuation centers.

The NDRRMC said a total of P1.26 billion worth of relief assistance has so far been provided to affected families. It likewise said a total of 35,489 personnel, 1,351 vehicles, 118 sea crafts, 163 aircrafts, and 28,361 other assets and equipment were deployed to affected areas.

The total cost of damages from Yolanda is estimated to be almost P40 billion, including infrastructure and agriculture. — RSJ/KG, GMA News

FROM THE TRIBUNE

Bishops: Noy’s ‘Yolanda’ apology good but restitution needed Written by Tribune Sunday, 16 March 2014 00:00

DINKY MAINTAINS VICTIMS SHOULD STAY IN VISAYAS


DINKY AND PNoy

MANILA -Catholic bishops were not convinced with the belated apology of President Aquino to typhoon “Yolanda” victims for the government’s ineffective relief efforts as they said the acknowledgement of his administration’s shortcomings must be accompanied with restitution.

The hoped for government make-up action is not forthcoming based on the results of a recent meeting of the typhoon victims with Social Welfare Secretary Dinky Soliman who told officers of People Surge, an alliance of Yolanda survivors, that they should have been in the Visayas and not protesting in Manila.

The officers of People Surge, led by its chairwoman Benedictine nun Edita Eslopor, had travelled to Manila last month to bring to the national government’s attention “the real situation in Eastern Visayas” after Yolanda.

Their dialog was held last Wednesday and lasted for an hour and their discussions centered on the Department of Social Welfare and Development’s (DSWD) announcement that it would stop distributing relief materials by the end of this month.

The group said the government’s relief distribution has been very slow and has failed to reach many underserved villages, including those near the highway in Leyte.

Aquino grilled by students of Hope Christian High School in Sta. Cruz, Manila last Thursday on the poor response of government to the tragedy caused by typhoon Yolanda admitted government mistakes but laid most of the blame to local government officials in Tacloban City which was hit hardest by the typhoon. Tacloban City’s governor is Alfred Romualdez, a political opponent.

Church leaders said the most important way to prove that the government is truly sorry for its highly criticized efforts in the aftermath of the typhoon is to ensure that the hurtful action is not repeated.

Despite the apology coming “too late,” the bishops said the apology over his administration’s shortcomings “It’s good that he apologized even if it’s too late. I hope that this admission will be followed with reform,” Manila Auxiliary Bishop Broderick Pabillo said.

Pabillo said the government should improve the delivery of relief assistance to affected areas and its rehabilitation efforts.
In Palo, Leyte, truckloads of spoiled relief goods were reportedly ended up in a dumpsite recently.

For Archbishop Angel Lagdameo of Iloilo, which was also devastated by the typhoon, said Aquino’s apology “should be well taken”.

According to him, there are factors that may have contributed to the slow response of the government.

“But as in the case of a ship, the captain takes all the blame because of command responsibility,” Lagdameo said.

“The best thing to do is make up for his shortcomings. What does he intend to do concretely? Many people are still suffering,” Cubao Bishop Honesto Ongtioco said.

People Surge leaders also tried to follow up with Soliman a petition they submitted to the Office of the President 100 days after Yolanda for the Aquino government to provide P40,000 in immediate cash relief for each family dislocated by the typhoon.

Soliman, however, said the government cannot give cash relief to every family in Eastern Visayas, because, with 280,000 families, the amount needed to be raised would reach P5 billion.

She did not give any reason why the government cannot spend P5-billion for cash relief, but she later said the Commission on Audit is watching them and they will be asked: ‘What is the basis for releasing funds?’

Instead of cash relief, Soliman cited the government’s upcoming new batch of cash-for-work program involving a 15-day minimum-wage paying work for cleanup or rebuilding tasks.

Soliman said the families under the CCT (Conditional Cash Transfer) program will have double compensation if the relief is provided. People Surge officials, however, said not all of the typhoon victims urgently needing relief and rehabilitation are covered by the CCT program, which they also criticized as a dole-out, stop-gap solution to poverty.

Soliman denied they had announced a stop to relief distribution by end of March. But by then, she said, only those “truly in need” would be given relief. She branded as “impostors” those who put up signages announcing the end of DSWD relief distribution.

Sr. Edita Eslopor said she saw such announcements posted “in many corners of the airport” and in other places in Eastern Visayas. Soliman claimed she did not see such signages when she was there last March 5.

By end of March, however, Soliman said they would conduct an assessment where it would be determined who are qualified to continue receiving government relief packs.

Soliman parried complaints of meagre to no relief reaching the needy by ticking off figures of how many foodpacks the DSWD had released to municipalities in Eastern Visayas.

FROM MANILA BULLETIN

Bohol shakes off dust of tragedy by Mike Ortega Ligalig March 16, 2014 (updated)


Filipino Hope Uy, 24, pays her respect before the statue of our Lady of Light outside a century old church damaged by a 7.2 Magnitude in 2013, in Loon Town of Bohol Province of central Philippines, Sunday, February 23, 2014. Bohol still needs over 200,000 euros for rehabilitation of infrastructures after an 7.2 magnitude earthquake that struck 15 October 2013. The rehabilitation program will focus on the restoration of damaged old houses and national heritage sites like the Chocolate Hills and Baclayon Church. The earthquake left more than 34,000 houses in Bohol in ruins. EPA/DENNIS M. SABANGAN

It has been five months since a 7.2-magnitude earthquake shattered Bohol’s centuries-old churches, toppled infrastructure, and traumatized the province’s 1.3 million inhabitants with 4,600 aftershocks.

The October 15, 2013 quake had claimed 210 lives, injured more than 750 persons, rendered about 80,000 families homeless, and displaced almost a third of the province’s population.

The quake has been considered as the worst of its kind to hit Bohol in half a millennium.

The basis for saying this is that: If the stone churches in Baclayon and Loboc towns stood intact for the last 400 years until last year, then it may be accurate to say that no ground-shaking as devastating as the October 15 tremor had rocked Bohol during the churches’ 400-year lifespan.

Despite the damage, estimated to be worth P6 billion, Boholanos have remained unflinching in their will to live as they shake off the dust of tragedy.

In a Christmas message last year, President Aquino said: “In Bohol, (the people) were down in the disaster, but I myself witnessed: Truly, they were rising, they were fighting.”


Bohol Gov. Edgar M. Chatto: Being a Governor, he is the brain of Bohol, and on his shoulder lies the burden of leading the Province to prosperity.

Bohol Gov. Edgar M. Chatto urged in his February 7 State of the Province Address (SOPA) to work together in restoring the province to its pre-quake status.

•Model Disaster Response

Quoting various sources, the governor said that Bohol’s disaster response has been cited as “Model of Action and Preparedness.”

More than 300,000 individuals, or 60,000 families had received food and water packs.

For shelter projects, the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) has set P912.69 million, while the National Housing Authority (NHA), P38.85 million, according to Gov. Chatto.

On Feb. 10, DSWD Sec. Dinky Soliman went to Bohol and with Gov. Chatto, signed memorandum of agreement with Habitat for Humanity to build 8,083 disaster-resistant houses worth P710 million.

•Housing

Under this, the DSWD, in coordination with Bohol government, will allocate P70,000, while the Habitat for Humanity will shell out P18,000 for each housing unit identified in the Core Shelter Assistance Project (CSAP).

Aside from rebuilding homes, damaged roads and bridges, like the Abatan and Tagbuane bridges, were also repaired.


A pile of rubble is seen inside the centuries-old Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception Church in Baclayon, Bohol on Thursday, October 17, two days after a magnitude-7.2 earthquake hit Central Visayas and damaged several historical sites. The NCCA is studying the possibilities of restoring the damaged churches back to its old glory. The Baclayon church was constructed in 1717 right after the town became a parish area. The current building was completed in 1727. Mariz Umali

•Restoration Of Churches

To restore the ancient churches and national heritage sites, P650 million has been allocated by the national government as confirmed by Budget Secretary Butch Abad on March 8.

•Business As Usual

Though tourists may no longer see the original form of old churches in Bohol, tourism has been “business as usual, ” even a day after the quake. Hotels and resorts in Panglao Island and in Anda peninsula remain unscathed.

“Guests at my resort have told me that they did not cancel their bookings because they believed that Bohol’s economy is in need of more tourists, especially right after the earthquake,” former Panglao Mayor Doloreich Dumaluan, a resort owner, said during the re-opening of the world-famous Loboc River Cruise Tour.

Gabriel Wallgreen, a Swedish proprietor of Sofia Pizzeria, also said: “Bohol is one of the safest places on earth right now. Another earthquake of similar magnitude is not likely to happen again here in 50 or 100 years.”

•Yolanda’s Effects

However, Bohol’s business community suffered the biggest loss in revenues due to the crumbling of power lines in Leyte when Yolanda pounded the Eastern Visayas region on November 8, 2013.

Bohol, through an underwater cable, gets its 68-megawatt electricity requirement from Leyte’s geothermal power plant.

For three weeks straight, Bohol plunged into total darkness which paralyzed business activities, though Energy Sec. Jericho Petilla delivered his promise of restoring power before December 2013.


YOLANDA'S EFFECT: Crew of a cargo vessel in Guindulman bay, Bohol were rescued from gigantic waves.

•Health Services

Meanwhile, in addressing health concerns at evacuation sites, the provincial government “restored access to essential health services, improved immunization coverage for vaccine-preventable diseases, established emergency disease surveillance, and continues to undertake repair, rehabilitation, and reconstruction of damaged health facilities, with the assistance of the DOH,” said Chatto.

•Budget For 1,134 Classrooms

In education, for 2014, the provincial government with the Department of Education set aside more than P1 billion for the construction and repair of 1,134 classrooms.

“Temporary learning spaces through the provision of tents, tarpaulins, back to school kits, teaching materials, psycho-social debriefings and trainings,” were also provided. Ongoing are the construction and repair of classrooms and supplemental feeding.”

•P12-B Rehab Plan

Nevertheless, the provincial government admitted that “much has been done, but there remains much still to do.”

All the rehabilitation efforts in Bohol have been laid down in the “Post-Great Bohol Earthquake Recovery and Rehabilitation Plan,” estimated to cost P12.314 billion. It went through a consultative process of fine-tuning, and secured endorsements through proper channels, according to Chatto.

To facilitate its funding, copies of the plan have been sent to the President and Secretaries of Oversight Agencies, including the National Economic Development Authority (NEDA), as well as all concerned national agencies.

At the other end, the United

•One Bohol

In the wake of Yolanda’s devastation, volunteer groups have created “ONE BOHOL,” which puts all forms of private assistance under one direction, one group, and one mind.

FROM PHILSTAR

Damayan starts to build schools in Samar, Leyte (The Philippine Star) | Updated March 16, 2014 - 12:00am 1 42 googleplus0 0


Photo shows a perspective of the school building that Damayan is constructing in three sites in Leyte and Samar where Yolanda destroyed schoolhouses (far left).

MANILA, Philippines - Determined to restore hope where there once was utter devastation, The Philippine STAR’s humanitarian arm, Operation Damayan, has headed back to areas struck by Super Typhoon Yolanda in Central Visayas to provide further assistance to communities that have been badly affected by the disaster.

This fulfills Damayan’s commitment to assist in rehabilitation efforts in these areas.

When the team of Operation Damayan visited Samar and Leyte days after Yolanda struck last year, residents were understandably on the verge of despair, their patience wearing thin as their homes and schools were reduced to rubble. They were thankful for help coming their way in the form of relief goods to help tide them over the difficult times.

Soon after, Operation Damayan returned to Tacloban, Samar and Leyte to distribute toys and school supplies to students in various schools in time for the New Year.

The gift-giving was symbolic of a new beginning for residents of disaster-stricken areas where Operation Damayan had committed to undertake school projects in time for the coming school year.

Today, with the help of generous donations from readers of The Philippine STAR, Operation Damayan has commenced the construction of three school buildings in Ormoc and Palo, Leyte; and Marabut, Samar under the aegis of its adopt-a-school program. The project is the biggest to be undertaken by Operation Damayan thus far.

Construction of the school buildings started early this month with a symbolic bayanihan ceremony.

At the Valencia Central Elementary School in Ormoc City, more than 100 parents helped clean the area in preparation for the construction.

Marlina Cabahug, mother of Grade 6 student Camilla Jane, enthusiastically participated in the activity, saying, “Para ito sa mga anak ko at bilang magulang natutuwa kami at magkaroon ng bagong (This is for my children and as a parent I’m happy we will have a new) school building.”

She added, “Mainit ang (It’s very hot in the) temporary classrooms nila, nahihirapan ang mga bata pati na ang mga teachers (the children and teachers are having a hard time).”

The current Grade 6 students may not get to use their new classroom because they are graduating this March, but they are happy because their younger siblings will be able to use the brand-new school facilities.

Young siblings Noe and Ladylyn Nemeno, both Grade 4 students, said, “Masaya po kami sa ipapatayo niyong (We are very happy about our) school building.” Their house was totally damaged by the typhoon.

The school has been in existence for 70 years and had 32 classrooms before being leveled by the typhoon. After the typhoon, only the walls of 11 classrooms were left standing.

“As a central school, we are really in need of a school building so that classes here could normalize,” said school principal Melvyn Baldomar.

In Palo, Leyte District II, one will notice a makeshift graveyard in front of San Joaquin Church where almost 370 people were buried. Beside the church, Operation Damayan found the San Joaquin Central Elementary School, also called a mother school, with students coming from 19 barangays in the area. The school had 429 enrollees but 67 of these students lost their lives in the typhoon and they now hold classes in makeshift classrooms donated by a foreign organization.

School principal Liberato Cobacha said, “We have enough relief goods and school materials. What we need is a school building… Kawawa ang mga estudyante, sobrang init sa (The poor students, it’s so hot in their) temporary classroom nila. Ang mga teachers nga nahi-high blood na.”

Joy overflowed among the teachers, parents and students when planning for the school building began, and workers and materials soon followed. As one of the teachers happily quipped, “Noong isang araw nag survey-survey lang, pero ngayon eto na. Nagpapatayo na kayo ng (The other day you were just surveying, now you are constructing our) school building.”

Construction is now ongoing as well at the Legazpi Elementary School in Barangay Veloso, Marabut, Samar.

School principal Salvacion Amadore, though off duty at the time, hurried back to school when she learned that Operation Damayan would build them a school with five classrooms and a toilet each plus a library. “Salamat, salamat, maraming salamat po (Thank you, thank you, thank you very much),” voices in the room echoed.


Cebuana Lhuillier Foundation has raised its donation for typhoon victims to P400,000 from an initial pledge of P250,000 to The STAR’s social arm, Operation Damayan. Jean Henri Lhuillier (second from left), president and CEO of P.J. Lhuillier Inc., along with Cebuana Lhuillier Foundation executive trustee and GM Cesar Vidal, turned over the check yesterday to STAR Group finance heads Angie Isidro and Mario Mendoza.

Operation Damayan hopes to finish the three school buildings in time for the opening of school in June this year. The Philippine STAR’s Operation Damayan continues to help communities rebuild their lives through reconstructing the heart and future of each community – the schools.

For 13 years, Operation Damayan has been rehabilitating and building schools in places as far as Barangay Banga-an, Banaue, Ifugao and Compostela Valley.

Operation Damayan was started by STAR founding chairman Betty Go-Belmonte in 1986 to help sick and needy children. But over the years, its year-round missions have expanded to cover disaster relief, bridge education, scholarships, environmental efforts and adopt-a-school initiatives.

It is now being continued by STAR president and CEO Miguel Belmonte, who believes greatly in the impact of The STAR’s adopt-a-school project on the country’s future.

For those who would like to continue sending their donations, deposits may be made to The Philippine STAR Operation Damayan c/o MBTC Aduana Branch Savings Account No. 151-7-15152422-9 (kindly confirm your deposit by sending a copy of the deposit slip with donor’s name to contactus@philstar.com.ph).

For inquiries, call 336-9598, e-mail at contactus@philstar.com.ph, follow @philippinestar on Twitter or visit www.facebook.com/ThePhilippineSTAR for updates.


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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