DEATH STALKS EVACUEES: POOR CONDITIONS AT ZAMBO EVACUATION CENTERS KILL 8

FEBRUARY 15 -A CATHOLIC Church official on Friday expressed alarm over the rising number of deaths in evacuation centers in Zamboanga City, saying that various illnesses are claiming a life every day. The death toll in evacuation centers in Zamboanga City has climbed to 81 as of Feb. 12, Msgr. Crisologo Manongas, administrator of the Archdiocese of Zamboanga, said, noting that at least one evacuee has been dying every day in recent weeks. “One person dies every day. I think more than half of them are children,” Manongas said. The Catholic Bishops Conference of the Philippines has already appealed to various private and government health institutions to extend help to thousands of evacuees at the Don Joaquin Enriquez Memorial Sports Complex in Zamboanga City who were displaced after the bloody terror attack by members of the Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF) in September last year.

PHOTOS: Tacloban: Two Months after Typhoon Yolanda

With 11 million people affected by the damage and 4 million people displaced, the estimated cost of damages totaled almost P37 trillion to infrastructure and agriculture. The international aid pledges alone now amounts to USD 573 billion according to Foreign Aid Transparency Hub (FAiTH) from different countries and international organizations. The major focus of devastation has been on Tacloban City located on the east coast of Samar and Leyte because of its location and the large population in low lying areas. Almost 90 percent of all structures were either destroyed or damaged. Death toll in Tacloban alone reached around 2,000 persons. Two months after the typhoon hit Tacloban, the images show the scenes of survivors and landscapes of this once bustling city.

ALSO: WHO pleads for calamity victims: Have a heart

The WHO official urged social media users to take selfies of themselves doing the “heartie” hand gesture, and post these photos on their online pages or on short messages. On Friday, as the public celebrated Valentine’s day with their loved ones, it also marked the 100th day since Typhoon Yolanda devastated some areas in t Eastern Philippines seaboard. Since the devastation that killed at least 6,000 people, the WHO has supported the Department of Health in coordinating the massive national and international medical relief operations that greatly assisted the efforts of the Philippine government in addressing this crisis. Last Friday, commuters of Metro Manila’s Light Rail Transit enjoyed the opportunity to participate more directly in the “Health at the Heart of Healing” advocacy effort by having their “heartie photos taken at the railway’s Roosevelt station by WHO personnel. All these heartie photographs will be included in printed tarpaulins that will be displayed in the affected areas to allow storm survivors to see the faces of the people who carry the message, “We are all still here, and still care,” WHO said.

ALSO: PH vows to ‘build back better’ 100 days after ‘Yolanda’

In this Friday February 14, 2014 photo, typhoon survivors go on with their daily chores as they recover from Typhoon Haiyan that struck Tacloban city and nearby provinces in central Philippines. The country marks the 100th day on Sunday after the super typhoon devastated the central Philippines. The government vowed Sunday to “build back better” 100 days after its deadliest typhoon left thousands dead and millions without homes. Acknowledging that huge gaps in rehabilitation remained despite progress in humanitarian work, the government urged all Filipinos and donor agencies to keep extending support to those still vulnerable. “As we mark the 100th day after Super Typhoon “Yolanda” (local name of Haiyan), the government is firmly determined to carry out massive rehabilitation efforts in all 171 municipalities and cities affected by this unprecedented calamity,” said presidential spokesman Herminio Coloma.


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Zamboanga: Death stalks evacuees


Pitiful sights. Zamboanga City residents try to go on with their lives five months after the Zamboanga City seige in September.

MANILA, FEBRUARY 17, 2014 (MANILA STANDARD) By Vito Barcelo - A CATHOLIC Church official on Friday expressed alarm over the rising number of deaths in evacuation centers in Zamboanga City, saying that various illnesses are claiming a life every day.

The death toll in evacuation centers in Zamboanga City has climbed to 81 as of Feb. 12, Msgr. Crisologo Manongas, administrator of the Archdiocese of Zamboanga, said, noting that at least one evacuee has been dying every day in recent weeks.

“One person dies every day. I think more than half of them are children,” Manongas said.

Senator Nancy Binay cited the same figures from the Zamboanga City Health Office and urged national agencies not to forget those living in the evacuation centes.

“Are we just going to bring them to the evacuation centers and then forget about them?” she asked.

The Catholic Bishops Conference of the Philippines has already appealed to various private and government health institutions to extend help to thousands of evacuees at the Don Joaquin Enriquez Memorial Sports Complex in Zamboanga City who were displaced after the bloody terror attack by members of the Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF) in September last year.

A total of 118,819 evacuees are still living in dirty conditions at the evacuation center. They survived the deadly attack but are now fighting to survive against illnesses, the church official said.

Manongas criticized the government for its failure to address the poor conditions of the evacuees

He said the displaced families continue to languish in evacuation centers as the government’s rehabilitation efforts has remained too slow.

“The situation is still the same. Nothing has improved. It’s the same old story,” he said.

The Zamboanga archdiocese continues to conduct programs to help the evacuees despite their limited resources through the help of other dioceses.

“We are going on with our relief effort and relocation. We are building permanent homes for a number of families... that’s an ongoing effort,” he said.

At least 80 houses were built by the archdiocese from their target of 400 permanent shelters.


The refugees are billeted at the Don Joaquin Enriquez Memorial Sports Complex. CBCP Photos

“Of course we lack (resources) because we are not receiving ample help anymore. I understand assistance [coming in is] for victims of [typhoon] Yolanda and [the earthquake] in Bohol,” he said.

But Binay in a separate interview said the Social Welfare and Health departments should not focus only on the victims of super typhoon Yolanda.

She underscored the need for long term monitoring of the condition of those staying in evacuation centers.

Thousands have been displaced by a spate of man-made and natural calamitie that hit the country in recent years, including typhoons Pablo, Sendong and Yolanda and the 7.2 magnitude earthquake which struck Bohol and Cebu.

An alliance Yolanda survivors in the Visayas on Friday vowed bigger and stronger protests against the government as they commemorate the 100th day after the killer typhoon struck. The group had given the government until Friday to act on their petition to grant P40,000 assistance to each surviving family.

The alliance, called People Surge, gathered 12,000 protesters in Tacloban City, which was hardest hit by Yolanda, to demonstrate against the government’s slow response to the disaster.

President Benigno Aquino III earlier announced a multi-billion-peso “build back better” program to rebuild communities devastated by Yolanda on Nov. 8, but survivors in the worst-hit areas said most of the aid they have received came not from the government but from international humanitarian organizations.

“Three months after typhoon Yolanda, the situation of the survivors has gone from worse to worst. Hunger and neglect continue to haunt them everyday, “ said June Benino, secretary general of the leftist group Bayan.

He also hit the government’s policy to forbid building within 40 meters of the coast.

More than 40,000 storm survivors have remained in tent Cities and temporary shelters as the government ‘s turn-over of bunkhouses has been slow.

Senator Ferdinand Marcos Jr., on an inspection of the bunkhouses in Tacloban and Palo in Leyte said he found them “wanting.”

The Palace, on the other hand, said 1,373 families have already moved to 60 completed bunkhouses in Leyte, Eastern Samar and Samar.

Communications Secretary Herminio Coloma said the government hoped to finish the bunkhouses by the end of February.

Berino said that the victims needed housing closer to their livelihood, and said the national government should consult the victims before deciding on policies that affect them.

Earlier in the week, the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs said the government’s response in providing shelter and livelihood to the victims of typhoon Yolanda was not enough. With Macon Ramos-Araneta and Ronald O. Reyes

FROM POSITIVE-MAGAZINE.COM

Tacloban: Two Months after Typhoon Yolanda Reportage Tuesday, February 4th, 2014 by Roland Nagy


Barangay Anibong was almost completely destroyed during the typhoon. Six container ships have been swept to shore which are still seen waiting to be removed from the ground. Meanwhile local people started to rebuild their homes from materials found among the debris. January 6, 2014

Reportage by Roland Nagy;

On Nov. 8, 2013, Typhoon Yolanda (International name: Typhoon Haiyan) hit the Philippines recorded as the most powerful tropical cyclone and deadliest typhoon. It had winds in excess of 185km/h which caused major damage and loss of life mainly due to storm surge. It left a path of destruction and fatalities through most of the provinces in Visayas.

According to the National Risk Reduction and Management Council, to date there are 6,201 dead, 28,626 injured and 1,785 missing across the 9 Regions in the Philippines. With 11 million people affected by the damage and 4 million people displaced, the estimated cost of damages totaled almost P37 trillion to infrastructure and agriculture.

As the news drew extensive international news coverage, it gave way to huge relief efforts both local and international.

The international aid pledges alone now amounts to USD 573 billion according to Foreign Aid Transparency Hub (FAiTH) from different countries and international organizations. The disaster brought in thousands of local volunteers and monetary pledges as well.

The major focus of devastation has been on Tacloban City located on the east coast of Samar and Leyte because of its location and the large population in low lying areas.

The storm surge in Tacloban had been as high as 4.5 meters and caused flooding extending to 1 kilometer inland on the east coast.

Almost 90 percent of all structures were either destroyed or damaged. Death toll in Tacloban alone reached around 2,000 persons.

Two months after the typhoon hit Tacloban, the images show the scenes of survivors and landscapes of this once bustling city.


Devastation scene in Barangay 56-A Tacloban January 6, 2014


Rayneil Caminong (27), a civil engineer on his regular morning run along Maharlika Highway in Tacloban. January 06, 2014 Tacloban, Philippines


Girby (8) and Alvin (10), friends had evacuated to higher grounds from Barangay Anibong, one of the most destroyed areas by storm surge in Tacloban. January 5, 2014


Judel Suberon (23), a licensed security guard works for M/V Gayle, a cargo ship carrying 25,000 bags of cement waiting to be removed from the land back to sea. January 5, 2014. Barangay Anibong, Tacloban


The church entry way bears announcements of missing relatives and purple ribbons in memory of the dead. Around 4,000 dead people had been buried unidentified. Cathedral of the Transfiguration of Our Lord in Palo, Tacloban. January 5, 2014

PHNO: FOR MORE PHOTOS CLICK HERE,

ABOUT THE PHOTO JOURNALIST, Roland Nagy: I was born and grew up in Hungary. In 2012, I moved to Manila, Philippines. My fascination with the life of the Filipinos gave me the intense drive to start my own photo documentary projects. It was here that I learned of different religious events, festivals and micro-communities that are unique to the country. In my photography, I like getting up close and involved in the events going around me. My aim is to discover cultural differences and to show social issues through my photography.

WHO pleads for calamity victims: Have a heart By Sara Susanne D. Fabunan | Feb. 16, 2014 at 12:01am

The World Health Organization has made an appeal for the public to show their concern for victims of Typhoon Yolanda and other calamities by posting their own “heartie” photos on social media throughout the month.


Dr. Julie Hall, WHO country representative

The “heart” gesture is a means of expressing solidarity with global efforts to help residents in the Yolanda corridor get their lives back together by beginning with their health concerns, said Dr. Julie Hall, WHO representative to the Philippines.

“Let us place Health in the Heart of Healing” Hall said in a statement. “It is going to take a healthy population to fuel the recovery and healing in the Yolanda affected areas as well as in Bohol and Zamboanga and other places impacted by events in 2013.”


WHO Representative to the Philippines Dr Julie Hall in the medical ward of Vicente Sotto Medical Centre in Cebu, November 21, 2013.

Television celebrity Jodi Santa Maria, who has been a strong advocate of health and healthy lifestyles, led the efforts to set an example to the public in her continued support to restore the health of thousands of people in the Visayas region.

Santa Maria also joined Hall in urging people all over the world to show how much they care about the families who have been severely affected by the killer typhoon and are still finding ways of getting their lives back on track.

“We should all be mindful of the need to place something as basic and fundamental as a person’s health above all other necessities,” the actress, who is also a pre-med student said as she did a “heartie” sign.

“After all, being free from debilitating diseases is a valuable asset for anyone who is striving to restore his home, livelihood, and way of life after such a calamity,” Santa Maria said.

The WHO official urged social media users to take selfies of themselves doing the “heartie” hand gesture, and post these photos on their online pages or on short messages.

On Friday, as the public celebrated Valentine’s day with their loved ones, it also marked the 100th day since Typhoon Yolanda devastated some areas in t Eastern Philippines seaboard.

Since the devastation that killed at least 6,000 people, the WHO has supported the Department of Health in coordinating the massive national and international medical relief operations that greatly assisted the efforts of the Philippine government in addressing this crisis.

Last Friday, commuters of Metro Manila’s Light Rail Transit enjoyed the opportunity to participate more directly in the “Health at the Heart of Healing” advocacy effort by having their “heartie photos taken at the railway’s Roosevelt station by WHO personnel. All these heartie photographs will be included in printed tarpaulins that will be displayed in the affected areas to allow storm survivors to see the faces of the people who carry the message, “We are all still here, and still care,” WHO said.

FROM INTERAKSYON.COM

SHOW YOUR LOVE | WHO asks all to post 'hearties' in support of Yolanda victims By: Jet Villa, InterAksyon.com February 7, 2014 8:17 AM InterAksyon.com The online news portal of TV5


Image from coolpcwallpapers.com

MANILA, Philippines - The World Health Organization (WHO) is trying out the "heartie" strategy to help super typhoon Yolanda victims in the Visayas recover much faster.

WHO Representative in the Philippines Dr. Julie Hall said that while individuals, agencies, and governments are involved in efforts to help ravaged communities in various ways, looking after their health should be a primary concern. "In the process of helping these people get their lives back together, we should always put health at the heart of healing," Hall said.


WHO Representative in the Philippines Dr Julie Hall plays with a baby at Tinago Stadium, Cebu City, which is now an evacuation centre. The baby (and her family) is one of the 240 evacuees who are currently taking shelter there, 21 November 2013.

On Thursday, WHO launched its "Health at the Heart of Healing" advocacy campaign, encouraging the public to post pictures of their "heartie" hand gesture on social media and other avenues.

The campaign is meant to generate support for efforts to address health issues still affecting Yolanda-devastated communities.

By flashing "heartie" hand gesture, "Filipinos and people all over the world to express their solidarity and support for the healing efforts of typhoon Yolanda survivors, particularly in the initiatives to build health infrastructure and healthcare systems in these areas better than they ever have been," Hall said.

The pictures should be posted, she said, on social media "with a statement of how they can place Health at the Heart of Healing for people in the Yolanda corridor."

"Everybody can show that they care for these families in whichever way they are able, whether by lending material or financial support, or simply by participating in this worthy advocacy," Hall added.

FROM THE INQUIRER

PH vows to ‘build back better’ 100 days after ‘Yolanda’ Agence France-Presse 5:41 pm | Sunday, February 16th, 2014


http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/files/2014/02/Philippines-Typhoon-100-day.jpg
In this Friday February 14, 2014 photo, typhoon survivors go on with their daily chores as they recover from Typhoon Haiyan that struck Tacloban city and nearby provinces in central Philippines. The country marks the 100th day on Sunday after the super typhoon devastated the central Philippines. AP

MANILA, Philippines — The government vowed Sunday to “build back better” 100 days after its deadliest typhoon left thousands dead and millions without homes.

Acknowledging that huge gaps in rehabilitation remained despite progress in humanitarian work, the government urged all Filipinos and donor agencies to keep extending support to those still vulnerable.

“As we mark the 100th day after Super Typhoon “Yolanda” (local name of Haiyan), the government is firmly determined to carry out massive rehabilitation efforts in all 171 municipalities and cities affected by this unprecedented calamity,” said presidential spokesman Herminio Coloma.

He said the disaster-prone country “must break the cycle of prediction, devastation and rehabilitation by adopting the principle of build back better” following the deadly storm.

Yolanda slammed into the central Visayas region on November 8 last year with winds of up to 315 kilometers (195 miles) an hour, triggering unprecedented destruction that left four million without homes.

It triggered huge tsunami-like storm surges that swallowed entire villages, killing at least 6,200 people with 2,000 others still missing.

The United Nations in a statement Sunday said that 100 days on, “needs remain enormous.” It called on government and aid agencies not to be complacent and to find ways to house those still without roofs over their heads.

“The need for durable shelter for millions of people whose homes were damaged or destroyed is critical,” said UN resident humanitarian coordinator Luiza Carvalho.

She said that 45 percent of the $788 million appeal the UN had launched had already been received, and it had benefited hundreds of thousands.

Some half a million families had already received tents and tarpaulins for temporary shelters, while emergency jobs programs helped put money in survivors’ pockets and revive local economies.

Carvalho said millions of jobs were destroyed or impaired after Yolanda tore down or damaged 33 million coconut trees, flooded fields with salt water, and swept away or wrecked 30,000 fishing vessels.

Coloma said the hard work of responding to all the humanitarian challenges remained.

“We realize that despite its best efforts, government is unable to adequately respond to all the needs of all the affected families and individuals,” Coloma said.

“We continue to welcome suggestions on how we can improve our response and assistance,” he said, adding that reports of corruption in aid distribution would be swiftly dealt with.


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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