LACIERDA: NOY ENDORSEMENT IN 2016 LETHAL TO OPPOSITION

Despite recent controversies, a political endorsement by President Aquino in 2016 would be “lethal” to the opposition, Malacañang said yesterday. Presidential spokesman Edwin Lacierda dismissed criticisms that the President’s meeting with senators during the impeachment of former chief justice Renato Corona would affect the chances of administration bets in the 2016 elections. “Whoever the President will endorse… the power of the President’s endorsement is lethal. It is effective and that’s the reason why… whoever the President would anoint, would certainly have an advantage,” he said. “If you look at 2016, there may be a number of reasons why people are trying to degrade the approval rating of the President. Speculations are rife that Aquino would endorse Interior Secretary Manuel Roxas II, who slid down to be his running mate in the 2010 elections, for president in the May 2016 elections.

ALSO: Tacloban mayor, Mar shake hands at Yolanda hearing

After a round of bitter exchange over the rescue and relief efforts in Tacloban City at the height of Super Typhoon Yolanda, Mayor Alfred Romualdez and Interior Secretary Mar Roxas seemed to have patched their differences on Thursday on how the disaster efforts were conducted at the local level. Roxas and Romualdez shook hands before and after the post disaster assessment conducted by the Congressional oversight committee on the Philippine Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Act of 2010 at the Senate. “Kami naman sa labas o media, sa spin, sa intriga ay pinalaki. Pero sa amin naman, walang nasa isip namin kundi ang kapakanan ng mga mamamayan,” Roxas said after the hearing. Roxas said he is seeking another meeting with Romualdez to determine what more help Tacloban City needs in the aftermath of the super typhoon.

ALSO: Noy to Bong: What balato?

The ouster of chief justice Renato Corona was no gift from Sen. Ramon Revilla Jr. or any of his colleagues as strong evidence – not pressure from Malacañang – sealed the magistrate’s fate in the Senate convened as an impeachment court, President Aquino said Tuesday night. “There seems to be that notion that there are people who are above the law. So ’di balatuhan ang usapan doon (It’s not about token sharing of gambling winnings). We believe we have a strong case,” Aquino said of Corona’s conviction, in an interview with television host Boy Abunda on the “Bandila” news program. Aquino lashed out at Revilla for trying to muddle the issue on the alleged embezzlement of the Priority Development Assistance Fund or pork barrel, for which the senator and several others are facing plunder and malversation charges. The President said Revilla should bear in mind that he was not in a fantasy movie. He also said the senator should make up his mind and set the record straight on how and why he had voted to convict Corona. “How do you pressure a senator? The description of the Senate is 24 kingdoms,” Aquino said.

ALSO: Aquino gave Revilla his P86 M pork after their meeting

What a liar we have for a President. His sidekick Interior Secretary
Mar Roxas invites Senator Ramon Revilla, Jr., an impeachment judge, to his famed “White House” mansion in Cubao for breakfast. After arriving there, Revilla is surprised: Roxas tells him they’ll instead have breakfast with President Aquino in Malacañang. What Revilla understandably didn’t say in his speech—but which would bolster his allegations—is that Aquino released the bulk of his P100 pork-barrel funds for 2012 after that meeting.On May 4, 2012—after his meeting with Aquino in Malacañang, which was in the last week of April, I was told— Abad released P86 million of Revilla’s P100 million pork barrel for the year. It was on May 29 that the Senate voted to boot out Corona as chief justice. These figures are from the budget department’s data.


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Palace: Noy endorsement in 2016 lethal to opposition

MANILA, JANUARY 27, 2014 (PHILSTAR) By Delon Porcalla -Despite recent controversies, a political endorsement by President Aquino in 2016 would be “lethal” to the opposition, Malacañang said yesterday.

Presidential spokesman Edwin Lacierda (photo) dismissed criticisms that the President’s meeting with senators during the impeachment of former chief justice Renato Corona would affect the chances of administration bets in the 2016 elections.

“Whoever the President will endorse… the power of the President’s endorsement is lethal. It is effective and that’s the reason why… whoever the President would anoint, would certainly have an advantage,” he said.

“If you look at 2016, there may be a number of reasons why people are trying to degrade the approval rating of the President. That’s understandable for those who are not in his camp,” he added.

Speculations are rife that Aquino would endorse Interior Secretary Manuel Roxas II, who slid down to be his running mate in the 2010 elections, for president in the May 2016 elections.

But the President said the Liberal Party has yet to discuss about their possible standard-bearer.

The President had confirmed he met with Senators Ramon Revilla Jr., Jinggoy Estrada, Teofisto Guingona III and Ralph Recto at the height of the impeachment trial of Corona.

But he said he only did what is right in accordance with his mandate, adding that it is up to the people to decide if it was improper.

Lacierda said the criticisms against the President hardly affected his approval rating.

“We have been on the path of tuwid na daan (straight path). We have been on the path of good governance. The President’s approval ratings have been unprecedented. Way past midterm, his numbers are still in the 70s,” he said.

“If you look at other heads of states, past midterm, their numbers are already in the 40s. It shows that the President has the trust of the people, has the faith of the people, and has the people behind him,” he added.

Tacloban mayor, Mar shake hands at Yolanda hearing By Christina Mendez (philstar.com) | Updated January 23, 2014 - 7:41pm 0 0 googleplus0 0


Photo from Interaksyon.com with news headline: Civil Gestures Between Romualdez, Roxas -
Tacloban City Mayor Alfred Romualdez (left) and Interior and Local Government Secretary Manuel "Mar" Roxas II shake hands at the start of a Yolanda Senate hearing, 23 January 2014. JAMIN VERDE/InterAksyon.com

MANILA, Philippines - After a round of bitter exchange over the rescue and relief efforts in Tacloban City at the height of Super Typhoon Yolanda, Mayor Alfred Romualdez and Interior Secretary Mar Roxas seemed to have patched their differences on Thursday on how the disaster efforts were conducted at the local level.

Roxas and Romualdez shook hands before and after the post disaster assessment conducted by the Congressional oversight committee on the Philippine Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Act of 2010 at the Senate.

“Kami naman sa labas o media, sa spin, sa intriga ay pinalaki. Pero sa amin naman, walang nasa isip namin kundi ang kapakanan ng mga mamamayan,” Roxas said after the hearing.

Roxas said he is seeking another meeting with Romualdez to determine what more help Tacloban City needs in the aftermath of the super typhoon.

“So, kami magkasama muli sa isang convivial na situation at in fact, inimbita ko si mayor na mag-usap kami sa ibang detalye kung ano pa ang pangangailangan sa darating na mga araw, bago siya bumalik ng Tacloban,” he said.

During the hearing, Defense Sec. Voltaire Gazmin, also chairperson of the National Disaster Risk Reduction Management Council (NDRRMC), briefed the committee on details how the council coped up with the effects of the super typhoon.

He gave the lawmakers a walk through on how the national government responded before, during and after Yolanda struck and devastated Eastern Visayas.

Gazmin also defended the administration against criticisms that it failed miserably to attend to the people’s needs, especially the victims, during the disaster. He said President Aquino has been forthright about the need for a better forecasting system, which is why “Yolanda, thus, came as no surprise.”

“We knew from the outset that it would be a storm of unusual strength,” he said, adding that the government’s weather forecasting system knew the actual track of Yolanda.

However, at one point during the hearing, Roxas admitted that they had an “oversight” when they failed to bring satellite phones which was why they had difficulty in establishing communication after the Yolanda typhoon made the landfall.

Oversight

“It's an oversight on our part,” said Roxas when asked by Sen. Nancy Binay why the team of Gazmin and Roxas, who were at Tacloban, did not have satellite phones at the height of the typhoon.

Roxas even joked that the satellite phones did not have “load” but he assured the oversight committee that the government was on top of the situation during the Yolanda disaster.

During the hearing, Romualdez lamented that electricity has not been fully restored almost two months after super typhoon ‘Yolanda’ hit the region.

After the hearing, Romualdez said electricity has been restored in only five percent of the city. “We are calling for help and coordination since only five percent of the city has electricity,” the mayor said.

Romualdez added that rehabilitation work in the city has slowed down.

Earlier, Romualdez urged local government officials to be more flexible in dealing with rules during times of disasters. “On the ground, we need leeway with regards to COA (Commission on Audit) when it comes to distribution,” he said.

“We can’t go by population census because victims would tend to move to barangays which were not hit by calamity,” he said.

He said it’s difficult to go by the census or the population because "if we give only 300 [food packs] and there were an additional 100 persons waiting in a barangay where they moved, there will be some fight."

“That’s only food,” said Romualdez, who clarified that he is not resorting to finger-pointing or blaming anyone in coming out with facts and situations in Tacloban city in the aftermath of the super typhoon.

He said there adjustments must be made in the implementation of rules.

The mayor earlier conplained that "politics" delayed relief operations in the city after Roxas demanded for some papers before giving assistance to the city.

Roxas was quoted as saying that they have to take measures before taking over the relief operations in the city since the clans of the mayor and President Aquino are known political rivals.

He did not deny the remark and even said: “Hindi po ba totoo naman na ang Romualdez ay Romualdez at ang Aquino ay Aquino?"

In the same inquiry, Senator Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr. backed up the call of Romualdez for flexibility during disasters.

He said the government should probably change its standard operating procedure of strictly having “first responders” when disasters strike.

“You shouldn’t say you are the first responder. We have been hearing that. Perhaps, this SOP should be changed and be made flexible,” he further said.

He said they should not be strict, adding that whoever is capable of helping, whoever is on site should respond to a disaster.

Roxas brushed aside claims by Romualdez and Marcos that they were being strict before providing assistance to typhoon victims.

Roxas explained that they were not bureaucratic during those times, but instead, they merely wanted everything to be in order to avoid any problem.

Roxas maintained that they did their best to address the needs of the typhoon victims. “In fact, were not able to go to our home for two weeks,” Roxas said.

“These intrigues, distractions, sometimes, they’re hurting, but I live them all to God,” Roxas added.

Marcos also raised the need to educate the public further on terms such as storm surge as well as the other policies related to handling evacuation, relief and rescue efforts during disasters.

Muntinlupa City Rep. Rodolfo Biazon repeatedly stressed the need to look into other regions affected by the recent disasters, not just Tacloban City.

Noy to Bong: What balato? By Aurea Calica (The Philippine Star) | Updated January 23, 2014 - 12:00am 0 4 googleplus0 0


PNoy: ‘I can’t influence, pressure Senate’s 24 kingdoms’

MANILA, Philippines - The ouster of chief justice Renato Corona was no gift from Sen. Ramon Revilla Jr. or any of his colleagues as strong evidence – not pressure from Malacañang – sealed the magistrate’s fate in the Senate convened as an impeachment court, President Aquino said Tuesday night.

“There seems to be that notion that there are people who are above the law. So ’di balatuhan ang usapan doon (It’s not about token sharing of gambling winnings). We believe we have a strong case,” Aquino said of Corona’s conviction, in an interview with television host Boy Abunda on the “Bandila” news program.

Aquino lashed out at Revilla for trying to muddle the issue on the alleged embezzlement of the Priority Development Assistance Fund or pork barrel, for which the senator and several others are facing plunder and malversation charges.

Revilla, in a privilege speech Monday, accused Aquino of asking him to vote for Corona’s conviction.

The President said Revilla should bear in mind that he was not in a fantasy movie.

He also said the senator should make up his mind and set the record straight on how and why he had voted to convict Corona.

“How do you pressure a senator? The description of the Senate is 24 kingdoms,” Aquino said.

Corona was convicted of betrayal of public trust and culpable violation of the Constitution for failing to fully disclose his wealth in his statement of assets, liabilities and net worth (SALN) as required under the Charter.

Aquino also took the opportunity to take a dig at Revilla yesterday when he led the groundbreaking of the Metro Manila Skyway Stage 3 designed to connect South Luzon Expressway (SLEX) and North Luzon Expressway (NLEX) and ease traffic congestion in Metro Manila.

Aquino said the project proves that the “straight and narrow path” was leading the country to development.

“As for those who have repeatedly asked and have intentionally turned a blind eye to what we’ve accomplished: This is the straight and narrow path. It was not fabricated by fantasy nor is it made up like a scene in a movie – it’s a real and concrete project that is brought by our honest and good government for the benefit of the Filipino people,” Aquino said, apparently referring to the actor-turned-senator’s fantasy movies and television shows.

“No matter how hard some try to look good and become a star just for their own interests, no one will be able to halt our collective progress as one nation,” Aquino said.

Aquino did not mention Revilla by name but made references to “Pogi,” the moniker given to the senator by whistle-blowers in the PDAF scam.

Bad script

In his “Bandila” interview, Aquino also chastised Revilla for acting like a bad scriptwriter when the latter claimed the President had begged for Corona’s conviction as balato.

“It’s not my dialogue. Anong hinihingi ko, balato? Nagsabong ba siya at nanalo siya? (What am I asking for, a share? Did he win in a cockfight?) This is a serious no,” the President said.

Revilla, in his privilege speech, accused Aquino and then Transportation Secretary Manuel Roxas II of asking him to vote for Corona’s conviction.

Revilla claimed he felt pressured by the President but told him he would do what was right for the country.

Aquino reiterated they met because there were reports at the time that various influential groups were trying to pressure the senators into acquitting Corona. “Can I just leave it at that? For us not to obtain justice?”

Aquino said Revilla did the right thing in voting for Corona’s ouster and it would be up to the senator to explain otherwise now. “So what is he now saying, that what he did was wrong?” Aquino asked.

At Malacañang, presidential spokesman Edwin Lacierda downplayed the effect of Revilla’s statement on the administration’s integrity.

“I think people will take it, will interpret it, differently,” Lacierda told a news briefing. “You may have a different perspective on what the statement of the President is. But as far as the President is concerned, he was very categorical that he asked the senators to decide the case on the merits,” he said.

He said Aquino simply wanted the senator-judges to be objective even if he had openly expressed his desire to see Corona ousted.

“The people spoke on the approval of the President when he went for the removal of the chief justice. It was no secret. It is common knowledge that the President’s position on the issue of the chief justice, so that was public knowledge,” he said.

High trust remains

He said the administration remains confident of the nation’s trust, considering that Aquino is the only head of state who has enjoyed the trust of the people for a very long period of time, as shown in all surveys.

“According to Pulse Asia, 74 percent or 73 percent of our countrymen approve of the performance rating of the President. Although this may just be a snapshot, this is still an objective view of the performance of the President,” Lacierda asserted.

He said there is no need for another survey to determine who is more credible between Aquino and Revilla regarding the issue.

Senators Jinggoy Estrada, Teofisto Guingona III and Ralph Recto had admitted meeting the President at the height of the impeachment trial but felt no pressure from Malacañang to convict the chief magistrate.

“It’s realistic for us to say that there were pressure groups, influence groups that were trying to put pressure on the senators. So that’s the reason why the President said he wanted to put less pressure (on them),” he explained.

“How does he put less pressure? Just to remind them that, at the time that you make a judgment on the case itself, please decide on the merits and not on any influence exerted by any group. So that was the statement coming from the President,” he added.

“You have political realities where certain groups can exert pressure not only on your person but also, for instance, in the area where you are running. This is not the only vote where you see pressure groups being exerted,” Lacierda said.

“There are a number of very controversial bills that we have seen some groups also exerting pressure. That’s a political reality of any sensitive vote on a sensitive national concern,” he said.

He also shrugged off Sen. Miriam Defensor-Santiago’s opinion that a Supreme Court ruling declaring the Disbursement Acceleration Program unconstitutional may pave the way for President Aquino’s impeachment.

“Not all acts that are deemed unconstitutional is synonymous with impeachable,” Lacierda said.

“A number of republic acts have been declared unconstitutional. A number of certain acts have been declared unconstitutional. That does not equate to impeachability,” he added.

‘Stop blaming P-Noy’

Revilla’s impassioned privilege speech drew brickbats from some members of the House of Representatives who chided him for blaming President Aquino for his legal woes instead of squarely facing the plunder complaint filed against him.

Iloilo Rep. Jerry Treñas said it was whistle-blower Benhur Luy “who is a complete stranger to the President and has no connection with the administration,” who accused Revilla as one of the beneficiaries in the multibillion-peso pork barrel scam masterminded allegedly by businesswoman Janet Lim-Napoles.

“I don’t think that blaming the President for his present problems would really have any bearing on the plunder case filed against him by the Department of Justice, which is duty-bound to act on complaints especially if the evidence is really strong,” Treñas said.

“He should direct his angst to Mr. Luy and confront him in the proper legal forum, because that’s the only way he can free himself from the legal woes that he is in right now. I think that he is barking up the wrong tree,” he said.

He said the senator’s privilege speech was meant to discredit the plunder complaint against him.

Quezon City Rep. Winston Castelo, for his part, said moves to impeach Aquino are unlikely to progress because they would not get the required number of lawmakers to support them.

He said the President still enjoys the political support of most members of the House of Representatives, where any impeachment complaint is lodged.

“Any move to impeach an impeachable official is always a numbers game. Without the numbers, the impeachment move is bound to fail,” Castelo said.

Luy, meanwhile, challenged Revilla to a face-off at the Senate after the lawmaker called him a liar and a forger.

In a text message sent to ABS-CBN News, Luy said he had no power to order the release of Revilla’s pork barrel funds to bogus non-government organizations (NGO) of Napoles.

Abakada Guro party-list Rep. Jonathan de la Cruz, for his part, filed House Resolution 709 directing the House committee on good government and public accountability to look into the possible misuse of taxpayers’ money, as well as abuse of power, in the impeachment and conviction of Corona.

De la Cruz said Malacañang may have used public funds under its Disbursement Acceleration Program to influence the senators to convict Corona. Delon Porcalla, Paolo Romero, Jess Diaz

FROM MANILA TIMES

Aquino gave Revilla his P86 M pork after their meeting by RIGOBERTO D. TIGLAO January 23, 2014 10:11 pm


Rigoberto Tiglao

What a liar we have for a President.

His sidekick Interior Secretary Mar Roxas invites Senator Ramon Revilla, Jr., an impeachment judge, to his famed “White House” mansion in Cubao for breakfast. After arriving there, Revilla is surprised: Roxas tells him they’ll instead have breakfast with President Aquino in Malacañang.

As if in some spy movie, Roxas drives his heavily tinted black Land Cruiser himself and asks Revilla to stay in the back seat, and they drive out of Mar’s mansion.

Revilla later on realizes why he was asked to sit in the back seat as if Roxas were his chauffeur.

It was so he wouldn’t be seen by the Presidential Security Guards when Roxas rolled up the window to be identified, so that the SUV would be allowed to enter the high-security PSG compound where “Bahay Pangarap,” a secluded bungalow where Aquino lives, is located far from the sight of Malacañang employees.

I’m sure Revilla smiled ear-to-ear when he saw Budget Secretary Florencio Abad there to join their breakfast meeting with Aquino. Yes, the budget secretary who releases government money.

Mar’s clandestine operation meant: No witnesses that Revilla ever was in the PSG compound at the President’s residence, or at his office across the Pasig. No guest book to prove Revilla was there.


Released May 5, 2012, after his meeting with Aquino. Source: www.dbm.gov.ph accessed Sept. 29-Oct. 3, 2013.

If Revilla had exposed that meeting at that time when Aquino was at his peak in popularity, it would have been the action star’s word against his. Presidential Spokesman Edwin Lacierda would have dismissed Revilla’s claim with his usual tactic of cracking a corny joke.

Deniability was in their minds for that meeting, as they knew it was an impeachable offense — the President meddling in the impeachment trial — when Aquino asked Revilla to vote Chief Justice Renato Corona guilty.

With Abad in the meeting, the press would have gone to town exposing the obvious bribery attempt on Revilla. Abad said in that meeting, according to Revilla: “Magtulungan tayo [Let’s help each other.].” That was a clear message, coming from the budget secretary: “If you want your pork-barrel, cooperate with us.”

But Aquino’s incompetence and pettiness have unraveled since that time, and his trust ratings have plummeted and more people would believe Revilla this time. Aquino didn’t have any choice but to admit the meeting took place.

Abad picked on the language Revilla alleged Aquino to have used, that it is not the President’s style to say “Balato mo na sa akin si Corona.” Maybe so. Maybe Aquino instead said: “Do me a big favor and vote to convict Corona.”

Roxas turned his back on reporters when first asked about the meeting. He later on issued a statement that the meeting with Revilla was about the “cityhood of Bacoor and his being head of the Lakas Party.”

What?

Lying hasn’t really been Roxas’ strength, as it usually isn’t for spoiled brats. (Aquino risked being accused of taking over Tacloban from a political enemy, he claimed, in response to videos showing him bullying the mayor to issue documents giving him authority over relief and rescue operations in the typhoon-ravaged city.)

Inconsistent lies
Aquino and Roxas couldn’t even get their fabrications consistent. Aquino didn’t even mention those issues about Bacoor and Lakas Party when he recounted what happened in his meeting with Revilla.

He said the topic was for him “to verify persistent reports that the senators were being pressured by interest groups to influence the outcome of the impeachment trial,” and that he merely asked Revilla to “decide on the basis of its merits.” If the Malacañang press corps had any wits at all, they could have very easily caught Aquino lying by quickly asking him: “Name one of these interest groups.”

All that cloak-and-dagger stuff to bring Revilla secretly to Aquino’s residence, with Roxas and Abad—his two top lieutenants—there in the breakfast meeting just to patronizingly ask a Senator-Judge to decide what’s right?

Didn’t he swear to do that as a Senator of the Republic?

It is shocking how Aquino and his officials would assume that the press and Filipinos are so stupid that they’d believe their explanation of the meeting.

UP political science professor Clarita Carlos claimed in a television interview that the President “has the right to try to influence the Senate, and that he does this routinely, for instance in pursuing his priority bills.”

What Carlos forgot though is that the Senate in an impeachment trial, when the meeting occurred, was not the Senate as a legislative body but as a court and the senators were the judges, just like the judges of the Sandiganbayan or even of municipal court.

If a mayor calls the Makati court judge to his residence to tell him that he should convict an accused in a case before the judge—or even just for him to decide “on the merits of the case”—he would be committing a serious obstruction of justice as well as contempt of court. If disclosed in public, that would require a mistrial declaration, and for the mayor to be charged for obstruction of justice.

Revilla’s claims would have been merely a Revilla-claims-Aquino-denies story, if not for revelations in the past several months that the President not only used the usual pork-barrel funds but the dubious Disbursement Acceleration Fund to bribe the Senator-Judges to convict Corona.

How those pork-barrel funds could be huge bribes has also been revealed by the Commission on Audit’s special report and by whistleblowers, that the money can be and had been hijacked by legislators through bogus NGOs.

Pork barrel released

What Revilla understandably didn’t say in his speech—but which would bolster his allegations—is that Aquino released the bulk of his P100 pork-barrel funds for 2012 after that meeting.

On May 4, 2012—after his meeting with Aquino in Malacañang, which was in the last week of April, I was told— Abad released P86 million of Revilla’s P100 million pork barrel for the year. It was on May 29 that the Senate voted to boot out Corona as chief justice. These figures are from the budget department’s data.

It wasn’t just Revilla who got their pork barrel funds on the eve of the vote or right after:

• Senator Jinggoy Estrada, whom Aquino the other day admitted he met to discuss Corona’s trial, got P50 million of his pork barrel money released on a single day before the vote, on May 4.

• Senator Lapid got P50 million released on April 26, and the remaining P50 million on May 8.

Even senators who were in Aquino’s camp or known to be supportive of him played it safe, didn’t believe the President’s promises, and had a show-me-the-money-first mentality.

• Senator Francis Escudero got P50.5 million of his pork barrel also on a single day, on April 18 and P46 million on May 8, two weeks before the Senate vote.

• Senator Alan Peter Cayetano got P57 million of his pork barrel released on a single day on February 17, when the trial went into high gear.

• Senator Manuel Villar got his P50 million released on a single day, May 18, 2012, about a week before the vote and got the remaining P50 million on July 6.

President Aquino must be impeached, if we are to regain our dignity as a nation under the rule of law, if Congress is to salvage what remains of its integrity after being so servile to him in the past three years, and joining him in a conspiracy to put the Supreme Court under his thumb.

Section 2 of the constitution specifies: “The President may be removed from office on impeachment for, and conviction of, culpable violation of the Constitution, treason, bribery, graft and corruption, other high crimes, or betrayal of public trust.”

It is only treason that Aquino had not committed among these crimes listed as basis for impeachment in his conspiracy to remove Chief Justice Corona in 2012.

Aquino’s impeachable crime is worse than the corruption Estrada was impeached for. Estrada would have been impeached for extorting money from a jueteng lord, a corrupt governor, and the unscrupulous owners of Belle Resources Corp.

Aquino’s crime is that he undermined the basic foundations of our republican, democratic system by attacking the Supreme Court that represents the independent judicial branch of government.

He committed bribery by offering the Senator-Judges the quick release of their pork barrel funds as well as an additional P100 million in such discretionary funds disguised as allocations out of the Disbursement Acceleration Fund.

By doing so he is also guilty of graft and corruption since the Anti Graft and Corrupt Practices Act deems guilty not only the recipient of bribe money guilty, but the briber—Aquino.
tiglao.manilatimes@gmail.com
www.rigobertotiglao.com and www.trigger.ph

23 Responses to Aquino gave Revilla his P86 M pork after their meeting

  1. Raul says:

    Corruption, Corruption and Corruption bihira na yatang matino sa Executive, Legislative baka rin sa Judiciary…parang normal lang mag Kurop harap harapan pa…wala na yatang konsensya itong mga taong ito…puro kasi iniisip PERA….Filipino kailan kaya tayo mag babago….Bulok na Bulok ang sistema natin….kaya kawawa taong BAYAN…

  2. Romeo M. Menorca says:

    What kind of values do we teach our children today?

    Very basic, they (the children) are asked to appreciate and put into practice GMRC (Good Manners and Right Conduct).
    In their elementary catechetical education they are told the difference between “good” and “bad”. We tell them “don’t tell a lie, BAD yun” – and Jesus will be very sad if you tell a lie.

    In one of my consultation visits (early December last year) to my friend – doctor we had an interesting conversation about some burning issues of the day – including that of Mr. Aquino’s administration. My doctor, a top-notch cardiologist of Asian Hospital and Makati Medical Center – told me “… Sir you should not tell a lie to your children (and grand children), tell them the truth. Tell them that most people in the government now cannot be trusted – AND THEY ARE LIARS”.

    He ended up by saying that – that was the way he explained the bad issues to his own children – and that if I do the same I would feel better with less medications.

  3. domingo says:

    If we just pause a little and look at whats happening to our country we see corruption everywhere in government as well as the private sector. Its a way of life already ang normal na kalakaran hard as it may be to accept. Its sad that whether it is right or wrong no longer matters its just the way it is. While it is not fair to say that corruption in our sociery started with this administration they must admit that they institutionalized it.

  4. mina says:

    A senator shld offer himself to be a state witness then sing bottom line s lahat ng bumotong senator to convict CJ Corona shld resign wala na silang credibility mga mukhang pera at traydor sa bayan

  5. Rachel says:

    Darkness can only be defeated by light. In this case, I see blurred light and about to succumbed to darkness. What standards do we use to fight darkness brought about by corruption? I pray for a leader who truly believes that to go the “right way” is to do the “right things” the right way. Our country deserves so much more. its our home. We want a Godly, orderly, disciplined, loving and caring home.

  6. Nes Trinidad says:

    Good piece Mr Tiglao. One thing I disagree with your article – you cannot just impeach this sitting president without implicating all those in the executive, legislative otherwise, like a many headed hydra monster it will still be there. Who am I referring too – the 20 senators who received monies to convict the former CJ, the 188 congressmen who impeached the ex CJ, budget sec Abad, the COA official who made that presentation, the AMLC officials who provided that illegal data, et al… Also, the little lady who gave the envelope to that cong. Umali…. So, short of an actual revolution or a coup d’état – nothing’s gonna change… They had to get Corona out bcuz of two impt issues which the SC will be involved in: for Aquino – it’s the HL compensation issue (the amt stipulated is the ruling is too small for the Cojuanco clan) and for Drilon n the LP – resolution of the VP protest in favor of Roxas before the 2016 elections so he can use govt machinery and keep the LP as the reigning political party…

  7. Bonifacio Bangayan Claudio says:

    Aquino could NOT be impeached because the legislators who could vote for such impeachment risk exposing themselves as “collaborators” who are equally guilty… likening themselves to the WW2 Japanese collaborators who had “suklob na bayong sa ulo” to hide from public recognition… Kayong mga collaborators na kahalintulad sa mga maka-buddhang-Hapon, KABUDA-BUDDHA-HAN NG !#@?&! N’YO… Lugami na sa hirap at pasakit ang Inang Bayan dahil sa inyong mga collaborators… “SAAN KAYO KUMUKUHA NG KAPAL NG MUKHA N’YO?!!” to borrow a collaborators expression…

  8. dusty says:

    Isnt it always like this no matter what official is involved. Corrupting here is inside every single politician as they have grown up with it, it has given them what they have in life so why change, as ive said many times i dont know where this country will begin to get it sorted.

  9. Jimmy Uy says:

    Aquino had a strong competitor to fight the other briber.

  10. perdan says:

    penoy and his cohorts’ time will come.

  11. Erwin says:

    Bitay????

  12. apolonio reyes says:

    MERON PA KAYA TAYONG MATINONG ELECTED AT APPOINTED OFFICALS SA GOBIERNONG ITO? SI PNOY ” BOY LAGAY- CC “, SI ROXAS ” BOY HATID -TUTA” AT SI ABAD ” BOY TAGA BIGAY SUHOL-TULUNGAN “, MGA SENATONGS ” BOYS TANGAP-SUHOL ” AT MGA TONGRESSMEN ” BOYS TANGAP SUHOL AT MGA BOY NO READ “. SAAN KAYA KUMUKUHANG KAPAL NG MUKHA ANG MGA ITO, SA PAGHALIK AT SA PERA NA NINAKAW NILA SA BAYAN NA PINAKAKAIN NILA SA PAMILYA NILA? TANONG LANG PO, TAMAAN HUWAG MAGALIT !

  13. Johnny Ramos says:

    Revilla revelation lack substance that would have attract more attention if only he admitted that he voted because of the pork barrel special releases. He should have done what chavit have done on erap. I think pnoy will not stop from influencing Morales to file plunder against bong in the days to come so he will be in jail on a non bailable offence. Sigurado gaganti si Boy ganti.

  14. jfvaldez says:

    with all your exposes against Aquino and his administration (along with your other accurate political analyses and opinion), you ought to be the next Phil president. an ambassadorship just wouldn’t cut it for your kind.

  15. ed says:

    very well said Mr. Tiglao, good research.

  16. Peter Gonzales says:

    Now it is very clear that Abnoy bribed senator/judges to impeached Corona. “Karumaldumal and ginawa ng corrupt na presidente at nga mga senadores na bumoto sa pagtangal kay Corona”. Ang kapal talaga ng mga mukha nila. All of them should be ousted whatever means necessary and punished to the extent allowed by law. People of the Philippines wake up and be indignant, regain the dignity that is ours.
    Do not be contented of what you are and what you have today. Do not only think individually what is just good for you but think what is good for the greater good of all the Filipinos who are presently suffering from corruption under this administration. Rise up mga kababayan at ipaglaban ang nararapat para sa bawat Pilipino – sa sarili natin, sa ating mga kapitbahay, sa ating mga magulang, sa ating mga anak at sa mga anak nga ating mga anak. Wake up from our long slumber and rise for the common good of all.

  17. Alejo Rosete says:

    If only his mother (President Cory Aquino) is alive today, she will say – ” Make a Supreme Sacrifice for the sake of the country – Resign”.

    President Cory Aquino, said this to President Gloria Arroyo – “Hello Garci tape”.

    Senator Joker Arroyo said – “the Student Council in Malacanang”. I think it should be “the Students in Malacanang”.

    This is what we got for electing a President who has no ambition to become president. The people put him there – now we all suffer (kayo ang Boss ko).

    Congress should do his job – save the country from the student occupants of Malacanang.

    If congress will not not their job, it is respectfully prayed that the Supreme Court will
    make a “Judicial Review” of the Impeachment of Chief Justice Corona to save the country and its people and our credibility as a nation.

  18. Sally says:

    Had Revilla disclosed then of what he knew about Aquino’s meddling in the Corona
    impeachment, the story should have been different. If one facilitate the commission
    of a crime, then he will be an accessory to the principal. True, we knew that Aquino
    is a corrupter in the highest degree, a menace and a national disaster. But if one
    lay his hands and give help to a thief, then he render himself as equally liable. I should
    appreciate Revilla for opening his mouth had he done it at the thick of the fight. But
    if he only does it for his own benefit, that is to even up with his accusers, then he
    is equally as corrupt as Aquino, Roxas and Abad. To all these people, go to hell.

  19. Tita Medina says:

    What about Pnoy siding with Malaysia over Sabah claim, causing deaths of our own people? Isn’t that treason? Pnoy committed ALL , to be a candidate for impeachment.

  20. Paul J. says:

    Had you not been from the camp of GMA, I would have applauded you for a well-written opinion.

  21. I wish you can a be gentleman when addressing the President.

  22. adrian faustino says:

    sa daming binigyan ng pangulo ng pork, saan napunta to?? we voted them to legislate laws, check & balance, not money handlers….wheres the money????

  23. Vi Bowler says:

    Mr. Tiglao, on the eve after Revilla’s privilege speech and during Coloma’s press conference with the Malacanang Press Corps, one reporter asked him the name/s of individuals or groups who Malacanang claimed are lobbying so Corona will not be ousted. He promised everybody that he will tell them the following day (I hope I heard it right) because that reporter was very insistent that he name names. I guess Mr. Coloma should answer who was behind it. Otherwise, nakalusot lang yan. 


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