BAGUIO TEMPERATURE DROPS TO COLDEST 8.1 DEG CELSIUS

Baguio City recorded its lowest temperature for the month on Sunday, January 19, the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (Pagasa) said in a report. Pagasa weather forecaster Buddy Javier said in a Philippine News Agency report that Baguio’s temperature dropped to 8.1 degrees Celsius at 5:10 a.m., lower than the 9.6 degrees Celsius recorded on January 12, Javier said. Baguio’s coldest temperature ever recorded was at 6.3 degrees on January 18, 1961, according to the report citing Pagasa’s climatological record. Meanwhile, Metro Manila felt its coldest temperature of the month on Saturday at 17.5 degrees Celsius, Javier said.

ALSO: Baguio’s coldest morning in 5 years

Baguio City experienced its coldest morning in five years on Sunday as the mercury dropped to 8.1 degrees Celsius. Cold winds blowing from China have made the mountain city’s mornings in the past few days exceptionally cold, said Rolando Bagorio, a weather observer at the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (Pagasa) in Baguio. “Kakaiba ang hangin (The wind was unusual),” Bagorio told the Inquirer by telephone. The country’s summer capital experienced its coldest day on Jan. 18, 1961, at 6.3 degrees. The metropolis experienced its lowest temperature at 15.1 degrees in 1987. Temperatures at the Pagasa Science Garden in Diliman, Quezon City, on Sunday were higher at 20 degrees.

ALSO: Winter in the Philippines

Ang laming! The air has been exceptionally cold this week, but it hasn’t broken records yet. The coldest temperature recorded in Baguio was at 6.3°C on January 18, 1961, while Metro Manila experienced its coldest temperature on Feb. 4, 1987 and Dec. 30, 1988 at 15.1°C, according to PAGASA. 74 22 Google +0

ALSO: Coldest December day added treat to tourists in Baguio

DECEMBER, 2013 -For a city that always looks forward to cooler nights, Tuesday’s 12 degrees Celsius—the lowest temperature in December— may be a harbinger of colder days in 2014. Rolando Bagorio, Baguio weather observer, said 2013′s coldest day was Jan. 17 when temperatures dropped to 9.5 degrees Celsius. But the cold and the unbearable traffic jams have prompted the city’s tourists to leave their vehicles in their hotels and inns and walk downtown. A jeepney driver plying the Dominican Hill route advised his passengers to try to stroll instead when traffic jams slowed down the usual 15-minute jeepney trip to downtown Baguio. “It is cold, but this is normal for us. It gets colder in January and February and we have learned to walk it off. You should try it,” the driver told a group of young women from Marikina City.

ALSO: Brrr nights bring out ‘winter’ wear in Baguio

As the mercury dropped to 10 degrees Celsius on Friday, people brought out mothballed winter clothes to cope with the nippy weather and look fashionable. The city experienced the coldest day this month on Jan. 11 when the temperature plunged to 9.6 degrees Celsius. Elderly women mixed and matched their homegrown sweaters with thick snow jackets at Burnham Park in Baguio City. The cooling temperatures have allowed local folk to bring out their best winter fashion gear, usually courtesy of Baguio’s secondhand clothes stores where snow jackets from the US and Asia are stocked. Bernie Wanawen, an ukay-ukay shop owner, laid out her collection of sweaters and jackets on Friday morning, confident that the cold would reel in customers. True enough, half of Wanawen’s winter wares were sold by noon. Her female customers, she volunteered, favored jackets with fur-lined collars and sleeves that sell for P350.


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS:

Baguio temperature drops to 8.1 degrees Celsius


http://goo.gl/spbnd3

MANILA, JANUARY 20, 2014 (INQUIRER) Baguio City recorded its lowest temperature for the month on Sunday, the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (Pagasa) said in a report.

Pagasa weather forecaster Buddy Javier said in a Philippine News Agency report that Baguio’s temperature dropped to 8.1 degrees Celsius at 5:10 a.m., lower than the 9.6 degrees Celsius recorded on January 12, Javier said.

Baguio’s coldest temperature ever recorded was at 6.3 degrees on January 18, 1961, according to the report citing Pagasa’s climatological record.

Meanwhile, Metro Manila felt its coldest temperature of the month on Saturday at 17.5 degrees Celsius, Javier said.

Sunday’s temperature in the National Capital Region hit 20 degrees at 5 a.m., he added.

Metro Manila’s coldest spell ever recorded was at 15.1 degrees on February 4, 1987 and December 30, 1988, the report said.

According to Pagasa’s latest weather outlook, Baguio is expected to experience temperatures from 10 to 18 degrees Celsius, while Metro Manila at 19 to 28 degrees Celsius.

The drop in temperature is caused by the northeast winds or “hanging Amihan,” which blows from Siberia and peaks in January to February, Javier said in the report.

Baguio’s coldest morn in 5 years By Jeannette I. Andrade Inquirer Northern Luzon, Philippine Daily Inquirer 2:37 am | Monday, January 20th, 2014 inquirerdotnet on Twitter | inquirerdotnet on Facebook


http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/files/2014/01/russian-fur-hat-baguio-weather.jpg
BIG CHILL A Russian fur hat and a scarf keep this man warm as he strolls through Burnham Park in Baguio City. The winter attire worn by many Baguio residents most likely came from the city’s secondhand shops, which reported an increase in sales as temperatures plunged in the past two weeks. RICHARD BALONGLONG/INQUIRER NORTHERN LUZON

Baguio City experienced its coldest morning in five years on Sunday as the mercury dropped to 8.1 degrees Celsius.

Cold winds blowing from China have made the mountain city’s mornings in the past few days exceptionally cold, said Rolando Bagorio, a weather observer at the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (Pagasa) in Baguio.

“Kakaiba ang hangin (The wind was unusual),” Bagorio told the Inquirer by telephone.

The country’s summer capital experienced its coldest day on Jan. 18, 1961, at 6.3 degrees.

In Metro Manila, the lowest temperature recorded so far this year was 17.5 degrees at around 2 a.m., Saturday. The metropolis experienced its lowest temperature at 15.1 degrees in 1987.

Temperatures at the Pagasa Science Garden in Diliman, Quezon City, on Sunday were higher at 20 degrees.
Enhanced ‘amihan’

Weather forecaster Gener Quitlong said the amihan (northeast monsoon) was being enhanced by Tropical Depression “Agaton,” making temperatures dip. “We currently have a slightly stronger amihan,” he said.

Quitlong said it could grow even colder in the first and second weeks of February until the monsoon ends by the week thereafter. January is usually the coldest month of the year.

In Baguio, temperature readings taken by Pagasa at 5 a.m. and 8 a.m. Sunday showed the mercury dropping to 8.1 degrees, the second-coldest since the 7.5 degrees on Jan. 14, 2009, according to Bagorio.

By 2 p.m., however, the temperature rose to 11.5 degrees.

But Bagorio said the chilly days that Baguio residents and visitors were experiencing were normal for the mountain resort city at this time of the year. January and February are its coldest months.

Bagorio said it was on Jan. 13, 1981, and Feb. 1, 1962, that the city woke up to a morning of 8.1 degrees.

Cups of coffee

Residents, who are used to the cold, have also noted the unusually chilly morning, forcing some to sip extra cups of coffee or smoke cigarettes to cope with the temperature drop.

Despite wearing jackets and sweaters, many tourists at parks and those who attended early morning Masses chose to stay under the sun and avoid shaded areas to keep warm.

Sunday’s temperature reading beat the lowest temperature that Baguio experienced this year on Jan. 12, which was 9.6 degrees. Last year, the lowest temperature in Baguio was 9.5 degrees on Jan. 18, while it was 18.1 degrees in Metro Manila on Jan. 24.

With the enhanced amihan, Pagasa advised fishing boats and other small sea vessels against venturing into the seas of Luzon while alerting larger vessels to big waves that could reach up to five meters.

Strong to gale-force winds associated with the surge of the northeast monsoon are expected to make sea conditions rough to very rough.

FROM PHILSTAR

Winter in the Philippines By Gino dela Paz Updated Saturday January 18, 2014 - 12:00am


Ang laming! The air has been exceptionally cold this week, but it hasn’t broken records yet. The coldest temperature recorded in Baguio was at 6.3°C on January 18, 1961, while Metro Manila experienced its coldest temperature on Feb. 4, 1987 and Dec. 30, 1988 at 15.1°C, according to PAGASA. 74 22 Google +0

MANILA, Philippines - As we rise from the collective food coma we slipped into during the holidays, it has become a tradition to start any conversation by commenting on the weather.

Remarkably uncontroversial, it's an excellent topic for small talk, since any observation about how noticeably cooler it is during the lazy days between Christmas and Valentine's Day will be greeted with sympathetic nods and perhaps an anecdote about how extra burdensome it is to get up in the morning.

Thanks to the northeast monsoon, blowing south from Siberia, Metro Manila is less sticky and muggy this time of the year. Baguio City, which experiences the chilliest temperature in the country, warrants attention as the forecast drops to the single digits. News headlines pertaining to the weather are the same as they were in the past: Expect things to stay pleasant until February.

While the respite from the usual heat is welcome, I couldn't help but place matters in a wider context. In the Canadian city of Calgary, where I spent some time as a student, my friends and I broke out our board shorts in celebration when it hit 1º Celsius, having endured below-freezing conditions at times -15º C, excluding wind chill days or weeks before. (I learned never to step out of the house without first consulting Weather.com.) Since then, this extreme temperature is what I've come to associate with the word cold. The 19.2º C we recorded in Metro Manila recently would constitute a near-heatwave in Calgary, where 20°C is the average high in June.

Weather in the 1900s

A survey of books written by foreigners staying in the archipelago during the early 20th century yields fascinating insights on acclimatization.

In An Observer in the Philippines or Life in Our New Possessions published in 1905 John Bancroft Devins, editor of The New York Observer, said: It was a bit trying when the mercury was hovering between 80º and 90º (Fahrenheit; around 27-32º C) to be told by the old resident of five years standing: You are fortunate not to be here during the hot weather.

Mrs. Campbell Dauncey, in the following year's An Englishwoman in the Philippines, remarked: I think the average Fahrenheit now is 83º, but as life here is adapted to such temperature, you must not think that means anything like what 83º would be in England? and if this is what they call winter, I am only thankful that I have not plunged at once into summer.

On the trying character of the Philippine climate," Arthur J. Brown says in The New Era in the Philippines: But the traveler who chooses for his visit what is euphemistically called winter' will be apt to perspiringly conjecture with Mark Twain in India that the term winter' is used merely for convenience, to distinguish between weather that will melt a brass door knob and weather that will make it only mushy."

Fickle mother nature

It seems that when talk comes to fickle Mother Nature, it's typical to hear a variation of a popular Mark Twain quote. If you don't like the weather in New England now, just wait a few minutes," said the American author and humorist, born Samuel Langhorne Clemens, in 1876. Everybody talks about the weather but nobody does anything about it" is also frequently attributed to Twain, but was in fact uttered by Charles Dudley Warner, his friend and collaborator.

With a degree of imagination, one can adjust both lines to suit the local setting. The first can be: If you don't like the weather in Manila now, just wait a few months." From dry and cool, it will be dry and hot in March then wet, hot and most likely flooded starting in June, coinciding with the annual carousel of typhoons. The second needs less of a tweak as it's part of one massive reality, far beyond anyone's control. The best we can do, following the freakish weather systems that have blighted not just the Philippines but other parts of the world, is to be prepared for whatever outcome.

So here's my suggestion. This euphemistically" mild weather won't last very long. Enjoy it while you can. In a few months, the noisiest headlines will once again whine about the opposite: how oppressive summertime is in the Philippines.

DECEMBER 2013 REPORT

Coldest December day added treat to tourists in Baguio Inquirer Northern Luzon 3:11 pm | Tuesday, December 31st, 2013


Schoolchildren bundle up as the temperature continues to dip in Baguio City on Monday, January 13, a day after the coldest day was recorded in the city so far this month at 9.6 degrees Celsius. PAGASA predicts the cold spell will last until February. Dave Leprozo

BAGUIO CITY, Philippines—For a city that always looks forward to cooler nights, Tuesday’s 12 degrees Celsius—the lowest temperature in December— may be a harbinger of colder days in 2014.

Rolando Bagorio, Baguio weather observer, said 2013′s coldest day was Jan. 17 when temperatures dropped to 9.5 degrees Celsius.

But the cold and the unbearable traffic jams have prompted the city’s tourists to leave their vehicles in their hotels and inns and walk downtown.

A jeepney driver plying the Dominican Hill route advised his passengers to try to stroll instead when traffic jams slowed down the usual 15-minute jeepney trip to downtown Baguio.

“It is cold, but this is normal for us. It gets colder in January and February and we have learned to walk it off. You should try it,” the driver told a group of young women from Marikina City.

Mayor Mauricio Domogan also suggested brisk walks to avoid heavy traffic leading to the downtown area, as well as the city’s popular visitor haunts, when he addressed tourist complaints about traffic jams on Monday.
He said the traffic problems prove that it is the weather that continues to draw people to the mountain city.
The Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration said Baguio’s temperature has been falling steadily throughout the holidays.

Bagorio said the mercury fell to 15.4 degrees Celsius on Dec. 24. It rose to 16.2 degrees Celsius on Christmas Day, only to drop slightly to 16 degrees Celsius on Dec. 26, and 14.5 degrees on Dec. 27, when President Aquino arrived here for a three-day vacation.

The temperature dropped suddenly to 12.5 degrees on Dec. 28, 12.6 degrees on Dec. 29, and 12.2 degrees on Dec. 30.

Bagorio said the city may still experience a temperature drop to 10 and 9 degrees at the start of 2014, based on the city’s weather pattern in the last 10 years.

The cooler temperature means that there is no better time to use that familiar knitted Baguio bonnet, one of the summer capital’s cheapest and popular souvenir items, than the next few days.

The cold means the demand for these knitted bonnets increases, making home-based knitters doubly busy.

Rose Fausto, 41, who has been knitting bonnets for the past five years, said she earns double when the cold spell starts.

“A knitter can make 30 bonnets a day on average, and they just do these in their own homes. But during the Christmas season, this number doubles, some even make 80 to 100 pieces a day because of the demand. The knitters are usually mothers who have day jobs like me. I wash clothes for a living when bonnet sales are slow,” Fausto said.

She said wholesalers in the “Hangar” area at the Baguio public market have their own network of knitters, whose products they supply to areas frequented by tourists in the city, such as the Maharlika Livelihood Complex, market stalls and the city’s parks.

She said their products reach as far as the Visayas.

Paul Zapata, a worker at the Francing Yarns and Accessories, said aside from bonnets, yarns in various colors are knitted into cardigans and sweaters and sold in shops in the city and in Cebu province and the Bicol region.

Fausto said that for 20 kg of yarn, a knitter can make 400 bonnets, and she can earn P3 for each item. A bonnet without design is sold for P25 by the wholesaler, while those with the “Baguio City” design cost more.

Souvenir shops usually sell a bonnet for P30 to P35 apiece or for P100 for a set of three.

Vendors in souvenir shops at the Maharlika Livelihood Center said bonnets sell well because these are cheaper than other souvenir items like shirts, shawls and sweaters.

“Through these bonnets, we can spot locals from tourists -– many Baguio residents would never be caught wearing one of these while tourists proudly wear them,” Belen Rosales, another souvenir shop owner, said.

Reports from Vincent Cabreza, Gobleth Moulic and Desiree Caluza, Inquirer Northern Luzon

Brrr nights bring out ‘winter’ wear in Baguio By Gobleth Moulic Inquirer Northern Luzon 2:30 am | Saturday, January 18th, 2014


http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/files/2014/01/170114_RB05.jpg
Elderly women mixed and matched their homegrown sweaters with thick snow jackets at Burnham Park in Baguio City. The cooling temperatures have allowed local folk to bring out their best winter fashion gear, usually courtesy of Baguio’s secondhand clothes stores where snow jackets from the US and Asia are stocked. PDI-NL PHOTOS / Richard Balonglong

As the mercury dropped to 10 degrees Celsius on Friday, people brought out mothballed winter clothes to cope with the nippy weather and look fashionable.

The city experienced the coldest day this month on Jan. 11 when the temperature plunged to 9.6 degrees Celsius.

The chill has meant brisk business for ukay-ukay shops as tourists hunt for thick, hooded sweatshirts or heavy winter jackets.

Fur-lined collars

Bernie Wanawen, an ukay-ukay shop owner, laid out her collection of sweaters and jackets on Friday morning, confident that the cold would reel in customers. True enough, half of Wanawen’s winter wares were sold by noon. Her female customers, she volunteered, favored jackets with fur-lined collars and sleeves that sell for P350.

Josephine Guimalan, an ukay-ukay shop salesclerk, said business has been good, as shoppers buy warm clothing not just to cope with the cold, but also to look fashionable.

Jacked-up prices

The demand has jacked up prices in some shops, with sweatshirts now selling from P180 to P300. Wanawen said she would sometimes advise customers to save their money and shop “during summer or when the cold season is over,” advice that often fell on deaf ears.

The hunt for cold weather outfits has also made the daily night market on Harrison Road fronting Burnham Park a major attraction. The market opens at 9 p.m., and shoppers often stay until midnight when the temperature is at its coldest, sipping cups of scalding hot coffee or chocolate and steaming bowls of arroz caldo (chicken porridge).

Sonia Carreon, a Dagupan City social worker, sorted out winter clothes in an ukay-ukay store along Session Road, and said she was shopping for her four children staying here until Jan. 19. She said their family outing had not anticipated the almost freezing January weather.


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

© Copyright, 2014 by PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE
All rights reserved


PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE [PHNO] WEBSITE