OVER 1,000 BODIES ROTTING IN TACLOBAN

More than a thousand bodies recovered in Tacloban City in the wake of Super Typhoon Yolanda have been left to rot in the open as authorities await the process of identifying them before they are buried in a mass grave. It could not be immediately ascertained if the bodies in Barangay Suhi have been included in the official fatality list of National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC) which, as of yesterday, totaled 6,111 from 6,109 last week. “The National Bureau of Investigation (NBI) is on a holiday break in Tacloban, leaving more than a thousand unburied and decomposing bodies,” TV-5 said in a report yesterday. In the same report, TV-5 also said residents of Barangay Suhi and those living in nearby areas are complaining of the unpleasant smell emanating from the decomposing bodies. The report triggered criticisms among concerned citizens, who said the unattended bodies are posing a health hazard to the storm survivors. FULL STORY BELOW BELOW

ALSO: 1,400 corpses remain unburied 7 weeks after ‘Yolanda’

Eutiquio Balunan, the local village chief, said government workers assigned to collect the typhoon dead began trucking them to San Isidro on November 10, where they have been exposed to the tropical heat and heavy seasonal rainshowers. There, state forensics experts try to identify the corpses, he told AFP. The processed corpses are then turned over to relatives, while those that are unclaimed are tagged and taken to a mass grave at the city cemetery about three kilometers away. “Our tally comprises those already tagged and processed by the local governments,” Balido, the disaster council spokesman, told AFP. Balunan, the village chief, said the processing of the cadavers had been suspended over the Christmas weekend as the forensics experts went on holiday. “We are requesting the city government to please bury the cadavers because our children and elderly residents are getting sick,” he said. “This place has become a fly factory.”

ALSO: ‘Yolanda’ survivor asks: where do I begin?

FOR the 43 families now housed at the Jose Fabella Center in Mandaluyong, a temporary shelter for the homeless set up by the Department of Social Welfare and Development, they are determined to live normal lives in Palo, Leyte. But the question is, how and where do we start? Currently there are 201 individuals, 13 of them orphaned by Super Typhoon Yolanda in November, who are being cared for by social workers of the government and private sector.

Photo: GMA NETWORK 24 ORAS cheers up Yolanda survivors on Christmas eve at Jose Fabella Center in Mandaluyong, Manila

Photo: 28,000 families to receive gifts - Iloilo Mayor Jed Patrick Mabilog leads a two-day annual gift-giving ceremony at the Freedom Grandstand.


READ FULL MEDIA REPORTS:

Over 1,000 bodies rotting in Tacloban

MANILA, DECEMBER 30, 2013 (PHILSTAR)  By Jaime Laude - More than a thousand bodies recovered in Tacloban City in the wake of Super Typhoon Yolanda have been left to rot in the open as authorities await the process of identifying them before they are buried in a mass grave.

It could not be immediately ascertained if the bodies in Barangay Suhi have been included in the official fatality list of National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC) which, as of yesterday, totaled 6,111 from 6,109 last week.

“The National Bureau of Investigation (NBI) is on a holiday break in Tacloban, leaving more than a thousand unburied and decomposing bodies,” TV-5 said in a report yesterday.

The government, through the NDRRMC, has tasked the NBI to process all recovered cadavers in Tacloban for recording and identification purposes.

There were reports that the NBI will resume the processing after the holidays.

In the same report, TV-5 also said residents of Barangay Suhi and those living in nearby areas are complaining of the unpleasant smell emanating from the decomposing bodies.

The report triggered criticisms among concerned citizens, who said the unattended bodies are posing a health hazard to the storm survivors.

“It’s more than a month now. What’s the government doing with the huge local and foreign financial assistance provided to the storm devastated areas?” a resident said.

“Why are they doing this. Don’t they pity the victims? How about if they themselves are victims too?” a certain Marivic Cruz remarked in the TV-5 report.

The death toll left by Yolanda in Western Visayas has increased to 273, higher than the 250 fatality figure officially reported by the NDRRMC from the region.

The Office of Civil Defense (OCD)-Western Visayas also said 620,311 families or 2,842,361 people were affected by Yolanda.

“Estimated cost of damage to infrastructure, agriculture and fisheries has amounted to P13.4 billion. The number of casualties consist of 273 dead, 3,924 injured and 28 missing,” the OCD-6 report said.

FROM THE INQUIRER

1,400 corpses remain unburied 7 weeks after ‘Yolanda’ Agence France-Presse 5:56 pm | Saturday, December 28th, 2013


AP FILE PHOTO

TACLOBAN CITY, Philippines — More than a thousand dead victims of Supertyphoon “Yolanda” (Haiyan) lay unburied Saturday, seven weeks after the region was battered by the Philippines’ deadliest storm, residents living alongside the stench said.

About 1,400 corpses, in sealed black body bags swarming with flies, lay on a muddy open field in San Isidro, a farming village on the outskirts of the destroyed central city of Tacloban, an AFP reporter saw.

“The stench has taken away our appetite. Even in our sleep, we have to wear face masks,” said local housewife Maritess Pedrosa, who lives in a house about 20 meters from the roadside city government property.

Yolanda killed 6,111 people and left 1,779 others missing on November 8, according to the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council.

This made the storm, which also left 4.4 million people homeless, one of the deadliest natural disasters in Philippine history.

Tacloban and nearby towns were devastated by tsunami-like giant waves unleashed by Yolanda which accounted for a majority of the dead.

The council’s spokesman, Reynaldo Balido, said he was unsure if the official death toll already included the cadavers in San Isidro.

Eutiquio Balunan, the local village chief, said government workers assigned to collect the typhoon dead began trucking them to San Isidro on November 10, where they have been exposed to the tropical heat and heavy seasonal rainshowers.

There, state forensics experts try to identify the corpses, he told AFP.

The processed corpses are then turned over to relatives, while those that are unclaimed are tagged and taken to a mass grave at the city cemetery about three kilometers away.

“Our tally comprises those already tagged and processed by the local governments,” Balido, the disaster council spokesman, told AFP.

Balunan, the village chief, said the processing of the cadavers had been suspended over the Christmas weekend as the forensics experts went on holiday.

“We are requesting the city government to please bury the cadavers because our children and elderly residents are getting sick,” he said.

“This place has become a fly factory.”

The cadavers are guarded by eight policemen. One officer who asked not to be named said they are under orders to prevent the cadavers from being eaten by stray dogs.

FROM MANILA TIMES

‘Yolanda’ survivor asks: where do I begin? December 27, 2013 7:56 pm by Ghio Ong Correspondent


43 families now housed at the Jose Fabella Center in Mandaluyong

FOR the 43 families now housed at the Jose Fabella Center in Mandaluyong, a temporary shelter for the homeless set up by the Department of Social Welfare and Development, they are determined to live normal lives in Palo, Leyte. But the question is, how and where do we start?

Currently there are 201 individuals, 13 of them orphaned by Super Typhoon Yolanda in November, who are being cared for by social workers of the government and private sector.

For Raquel Triqueros, 20 and a mother of four, she is determined to return to Palo, Leyte by the third week of January 2014 to regain a normal life with her children going back to school.

“We are definitely going home. But we don’t know where to start? Do we rebuild our modest house first? How will we eat there? Where would my children go to school when their school has been completely destroyed.” She posed these endless questions in an interview last Christmas with The Manila Times.

Along with 43 others, her family is currently staying at the Fabella Center, where they enjoy food packs, therapy sessions and other kinds of assistance from private individuals and groups visiting the center.

While most of the families moved here days after the typhoon hit Visayas, the Trigueros family came to Manila just before Christmas from Palo.

She said she had to bring her eldest son first to a hospital in Manila because of a dog bite on the cheek since medical services back home were almost nil.

Luckily, no one in her family died during Yolanda’s furious surges. Even her mother survived drowning by holding on to the mango tree that was tumbled down by the surge.

When they return and rebuild their lives in Palo, her husband will apply for a job in Manila since there is practically nothing to work for in copra, with most of the coconut trees downed by the howler.

Her two children—Sean, 6, and Spencer, 4—keep on asking when they would go back to school. Sean, an honor student in his school in Palo, wanted to receive school items more than relief packs and toys last Christmas so he jostled with other children to get his share of school supplies given by a private group here.

Both Sean and Spencer want to be policemen when they grow up to ensure peace (with their guns) and to help other people, they said.

Raquel does not want her children to study in Manila because of the high cost of education, even if tuition fee is free. She is optimistic that her children’s school will also be fixed in time for classes this January.

Her wish for the New Year is that Filipinos would continue helping each other to speed up the recovery and rehabilitation of survivors of Yolanda, besides her personal wish that her house would be fixed and her children would soon return to school.

“This can only be realized if we all work together and help one another,” she said.

The children staying at the center seemed not to mind or show signs of trauma from the disaster they went through last month.

Most of them continue playing ball games in the center’s basketball court, while others played with toys of all sorts—stuffed toys, cars, board games, a mini-billiards set, even wheelchairs.

With bright smiles in their faces, they instantly become symbols of hope and recovery after the tragedy, said Eva Villegas, social worker at the Fabella Center.

Villegas said that when they first arrived at the center, they were staring blankly and were not responding to anything. “It is encouraging that they are smiling now, an indication that they have overcome their setbacks,” she explained.

She said that while DSWD announced the cessation of relief for Yolanda survivors, the agency still monitors their efforts for rehabilitation through coordination with the concerned local governments.

As planned, the local governments take care of shelter, education and livelihood of the survivors. “What we can give them are temporary shelters and relief aid in partnership with private donors,” she said.

In addition, DSWD shoulders the expense of bringing back the survivors to Leyte or other provinces affected by the super howler.

28,000 families to receive gifts December 26, 2013 9:14 pm


https://scontent-a-lga.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-frc3/1549496_701408519890700_1236728203_n.jpg
PHOTO FROM THE ILOILO GOVT FACEBOOK TIMELINE: GIFT-GIVING FOR PWDs & SENIOR CITIZENS

Some 5,000 PWDs and senior citizens received their gift packs from the City Government Dec. 27.

Some 23,000 indigents will get their gift packs Dec. 28. “We are doing this every year to give cheers to the less fortunate, and to make them feel we are not forgetting them as their welfare is always foremost in our minds,” stressed Mayor Jed Patrick E. Mabilog.

The beneficiaries got a gift pack containing rice, noodles, canned goods and other grocery items. Identification of beneficiaries was done by barangays and validated by City Social Welfare and Development Office.

NEWSBRIEF FROM THE MANILA TIMES

ILOILO CITY: Mayor Jed Patrick Mabilog leads a two-day annual gift-giving ceremony at the Freedom Grandstand.

Some 28,000 families will receive gift packs consisting of rice, canned goods and noodles.

A total of 5,500 senior citizens and disabled will receive their gift packs today while barangay families will receive theirs on Saturday. Mabilog said he is keeping up the tradition of annual gift giving to families selected by their respective barangay officials. Lydia C. Pendon

FROM GMA NEWS TV

24 Oras cheers up Yolanda survivors in Christmas eve party Uploaded on 8:06PM Dec 24

GMA News 24 Oras anchor Mike Enriquez cheers on the children, all of them Yolanda survivors currently residing at the Jose Fabella Center in Mandaluyong, as they dance during a Christmas eve party at the GMA Network Center on Tuesday hosted by the news program. Roehl Niño Bautista, GMA News


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

© Copyright, 2013 by PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE
All rights reserved


PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE [PHNO] WEBSITE