P40-B REHAB FUND SET ASIDE; DEATH TOLL, 5632

“The brunt of Typhoon Yolanda’s powerful onslaught, Signal No. 4 wind velocity of up to 250 kph and accompanying storm surge, was absorbed by 63 municipalities in Region 8’s Leyte and Samar provinces; as well as 84 municipalities in (the Western Visayas region). “ “These municipalities cover 4,971 barangays in an area of 25,000 square kilometers with an estimated total population (as of 2010) of 6.6 million,” he added.

ALSO: UN readies 200,000 jobs for ‘Yolanda’ survivors

Tens of thousands of desperately needed jobs are being created for survivors of a catastrophic typhoon in the Philippines by paying them to clear mountains of waste from ruined cities and farms. UN agencies are spearheading the “cash-for-work” programs, which they hope will provide a triple-boost to communities destroyed by super-typhoon “Haiyan” (locally named “Yolanda”), with lifting morale as vital as cleaning up and helping economies.

ALSO: Double tragedy for farmers feared - UN (FAO)

The Philippines faces a double tragedy if Filipino farmers who were directly affected by the devastation of super-typhoon “Yolanda” are not provided with immediate assistance, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) has warned. “The urgency of timing can’t be overstated,” said Burgeon in a statement as he noted that food is still a priority in the Visayas region three weeks after it was hit by the typhoon that killed over 5,000 people and affecting more than 13 million others, nearly 3.5 million of them left homeless. The UN agency already called on donors to urgently provide more than $11 million to help rural communities clean and clear agricultural land and de-silt irrigation canals in the typhoon-aftermath.

ALSO: ''SOS Philippines'' - The song after the storm! [TYPHOON HAIYAN / YOLANDA] Armand TJ Armand TJ

Facebook: ''Like'' http://www.facebook.com/armandtjmusic Twitter: Follow https://twitter.com/armandtj p.s. The singers in the video are students from CHJ and UPV (Iloilo and Miagao), UPV Choristers! I'm Atenean, and was part of the Ateneo College Glee Club. ;) -Armand


P40-b rehab fund set aside; death toll, 5632


A rainbow appears over Tacloban Pier on Friday, seemingly pointing at Cavalry Hill one week after Yolanda wrecked the city. PHOTO COURTESY IF GMA NEWS TV, Raffy Tima, GMA News

MANILA, DECEMBER 2, 2013 (MANILA STANDARD) By Ronald Reyes - THE government has earmarked P40.9 billion to fund the rehabilitation of disaster areas in Eastern Visayas after the devastation of Super Typhoon Yolanda, Presidential Communications Operations Office Secretary Herminio Coloma Jr. said on Saturday.

Coloma announced the allocation as the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council said 70% of the debris left in Eastern Samar by Yolanda has already been even as the death toll reached 5,632 with 1,759 still missing and 26,136 injured.

Coloma Jr. said the money will be spent in priority areas located within the 50-kilometer zone from the eye of Typhoon Yolanda that struck Eastern Visayas and nearby regions and includes 171 municipalities in 14 provinces and six regions, Coloma said over dzRB Radyo ng Bayan.

These municipalities cover 4,971 barangays in an area of 25,000 square kilometers with an estimated total population 6.6 million as of 2010, he said. He added that the DOST is conducting continuing analysis of satellite images to guide on-ground assessment of actual needs.

“The brunt of Typhoon Yolanda’s powerful onslaught, Signal No. 4 wind velocity of up to 250 kph and accompanying storm surge, was absorbed by 63 municipalities in Region 8’s Leyte and Samar provinces; as well as 84 municipalities in (the Western Visayas region). “

“These municipalities cover 4,971 barangays in an area of 25,000 square kilometers with an estimated total population (as of 2010) of 6.6 million,” he added.

Coloma said priority rehabilitation and reconstruction will focus on housing and resettlement; reconstructing the economic and social infrastructure; restoring government and public services; restoring agriculture and fisheries; and re-energizing local economic development through livelihood and employment.

“The initial estimate of 38.8 billion pesos was revised upward to 40.9 billion pesos, after factoring in the verified requirements for local government buildings and facilities, police and fire stations, and public markets.”

Operations on the ground will be coordinated by former Leyte governor now Energy Secretary Jericho Petilla “due to his familiarity with the on-ground being a former governor in the province,” Coloma said.

Other Cabinet officials who will be involved are Public Works Sec. Rogelio Singson, Agriculture Sec. Proceso Alcala, Trade and Industry Secretary Gregory Domingo, Labor Sec. Rosalinda Baldoz, Education Sec. Armin Luistro, Higher Education Commissioner Patricia Licuanan and Director General Villanueva of teh Techinical Education and Skills Development Authority.

NDRRMC Executive Director Eduardo del Rosario said that as of November 29, various government agencies tasked with clearing operations were able to remove 69,672 cubic meters of debris in Leyte, reflecting a 92 percent rate of accomplishment.

With the pace of the clearing operations, Del Rosario said the government will be ready for the rebuilding of damaged houses at it transports thousands of building materials to typhoon hit areas in Eastern Visayas.

“We are talking about 240,000 partially damaged houses which will be the focused of the distribution of construction materials by the government,” Del Rosario said.

He said the building materials that would be shipped to Eastern Visayas includes roofing materials, nails, hammer, wooden saw and umbrella nails which will handed to owners of the damaged houses.

Del Rosario said every household will be given 24 pieces of roofing sheets, one hammer, one wooden saw, one and a half kilo of 3-inch nails, 1.5 killos of umbrella nails which they will using for the reconstructions of partially-damage dwellings.

“So, when we give a family of buildings materials, they would now have the capacity to repair their roofs in order to protect them from the heat of sunlight and rains in the coming days,” Del Rosario explained.

He said the distribution of the materials will commence Sunday in three unidentified municipalities and three villages as pilot-testing areas of the reconstruction wherein 200 families would be the first batch of beneficiaries.

Del Rosario said owners of houses damage partially by Yolanda will be given first a redemption card in order for them to withdraw the construction materials at the distribution center, a scheme to attest the owner legitimacy and avoid duplication.

Del Rosario said the distribution of building materials will be centered in Tacloban City and once the system is proven effective, the rest of the 500,000 damaged houses will also be addressed.

However, houses which lies along the shorelines which have been flattened by the ferocity of Yolanda, will not be permitted to rebuild.

Instead, the 6,000 families leaving in the danger zones will be accommodated in 250 bunk house sites now being constructed by the Department of Public Works and Highways in Tacloban City.

“Houses damage along the shoreline is not included in the distribution of building materials and only those whose houses partially damage far from the no build zone,” Del Rosario said.

But field reports disclosed that tons of debris from damage infrastructures and private structures have not yet been removed especially in the interior villages of Tacloban City and other municipalities in the province.

The Task Force Cadaver, together with New Zealand volunteers, in charge in the clearing operations for the huge debris and recovery of dead bodies in Tacloban City are still removing volume of obstacles in the city.

So far, the task force led by Sr. Supt Pablito Cordeta of the Bureau of Fire Protection has collected 2,038 dead victims since November 15.

The NDRRMC reported that the official death count climb to 5,632 with the recovery of 38 more fatalities recovered while 1,759 missing and 26, 136 injured in Tacloban City Saturday.

Yolanda also affected 2,335,031 families or 10,999,244 people in 12,014 villages in 44 provinces. Of the 48,084 families or 218,512 people are staying in 1,084 evacuation shelters.

The NDRRMC said some 582,872 houses were totally destroyed and partillay damage 586,082 others while the cost of damages to infrastructures pegged at P15,620,130,890 and P14,980,238,240.21 to agriculture totaled to P30.6 billion. With Francisco Tuyay

FROM MANILA BULLETIN

UN readies 200,000 jobs for ‘Yolanda’ survivors November 29, 2013 Manila Bulletin


NEW CALVARY — Coming down a hill of ruins of houses in Tacloban City yesterday, a man carries on his shoulder a salvaged piece of wood as long as the cross that symbolized Jesus Christ’s great sacrifice on the road to Salvation – much like his journey to rebuilding his house ruined by typhoon ‘Yolanda.’ (Noel Celis/AFP)

Tacloban – Tens of thousands of desperately needed jobs are being created for survivors of a catastrophic typhoon in the Philippines by paying them to clear mountains of waste from ruined cities and farms.

UN agencies are spearheading the “cash-for-work” programs, which they hope will provide a triple-boost to communities destroyed by super-typhoon “Haiyan” (locally named “Yolanda”), with lifting morale as vital as cleaning up and helping economies.

“This is not only important to help normalize the economy, but working gives a sense of dignity back in their lives,” said Tim Walsh, leader of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) team deployed to the worst-hit city of Tacloban and nearby areas.

The United Nations, working in partnership with the Philippine government, is hoping to create at least 200,000 jobs that could last for up to three years.

Debris Clearing

Walsh said their immediate task was to help clear the mountains of rotting garbage and debris, which is necessary to allow for faster transport of aid and delivery of other essential services.

As much of the material as possible will then be recycled.

Yolanda, the most powerful typhoon ever recorded to have hit land, slashed across mostly poor Visayas islands, killing more than 5,500 people and destroying or damaging the homes of four million.

Giant storm surges generated by the typhoon were more destructive than the winds, powering more than one kilometer (0.6 miles) inland on the islands of Leyte and Samar.

Dozens of coastal communities were obliterated, as the water crushed homes, fishing boats, vehicles, electrical posts and virtually every other piece of urban infrastructure.

Vast stretches of coastal rice farms were also contaminated and their irrigation channels destroyed, while the wind tore down millions of coconut trees that were a mainstay of the already extremely poor islands.

Leslie Wright, a spokeswoman for the UNDP team in Tacloban, said the cash-for-work program was similar to an effort in Indonesia’s Aceh region after one of the world’s most devastating tsunamis killed 170,000 people there in 2004.

“Some of the things we are seeing that are comparable to Aceh include the consistency of the debris – like the wood, the metal, rock and concrete, aside from the organic waste and the bodies still being extracted every day,” she said.

Up To P500 Per Volunteer

The volunteer workers are being paid between 250 and 500 pesos (5-10 dollars) a day to haul the debris to selected collection points, where trucks pick them up to be taken to temporary landfills outside the city for sorting.

“The wood and timber we can refurbish, which we did in Aceh, where we used them to rebuild schools and houses, while the concrete we used for roads,” Wright said.

“We re-used as much material as we could.”

The UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization is looking to set up similar cash-for-work program in agricultural areas, paying farmers and others in the community to clear their land and desilt irrigation canals.

It said its program will cover more than 150,000 hectares (370,000 acres) and 80 kilometers (50 miles) of communal irrigation canals that need to be cleaned, warning upcoming harvests are at dire risk without quick action.

Appeal For $11M

However, the FAO needs more money to get the program into top gear, and this week launched an international appeal for $11 million.

John Lim, the Tacloban city administrator, said having people help in the clearing and rebuilding process was an important way for them to deal with the trauma of the disaster.

“We want to give them a sense of direction, to try and get them back on their feet by giving them an incentive in helping us clean the community,” Lim said.

And for workers such as Rowena Cayuda, a mother of five, there is indeed relief that they no longer have to depend solely on aid to survive, as well as a touch of pride.

“We are doing decent work and we are helping the community,” Cayuda said as she pulled at a rusted metal sheet roofs in Tacloban.

Cayuda said she and her mechanic husband, who lost his job after the auto shop he worked for was destroyed, had initially thought of abandoning the city, but they didn’t have any money to travel.

“Now that we have a little, we think we can start a small business, maybe a store and not leave at all,” Cayuda said.

Double tragedy for farmers feared by Roy Mabasa November 29, 2013 MANILA BULLETIN


Fallen trees near Guiuan, Eastern Samar look like matchsticks after super typhoon Yolanda hit the province hard. REUTERS/Edgar Su

Manila, Philippines – The Philippines faces a double tragedy if Filipino farmers who were directly affected by the devastation of super-typhoon “Yolanda” are not provided with immediate assistance, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) has warned.

It would be a double tragedy, explained Dominique Burgeon, director of FAO’s Emergency and Rehabilitation Division, if next harvest season the farmers still needed to rely on continued humanitarian food assistance.

“The urgency of timing can’t be overstated,” said Burgeon in a statement as he noted that food is still a priority in the Visayas region three weeks after it was hit by the typhoon that killed over 5,000 people and affecting more than 13 million others, nearly 3.5 million of them left homeless.

The UN agency already called on donors to urgently provide more than $11 million to help rural communities clean and clear agricultural land and de-silt irrigation canals in the typhoon-aftermath.

This call is in addition to the $20 million already requested by FAO to help typhoon-affected farmers plant, fertilize, irrigate, and maintain crops to ensure the next harvests in 2014.

“We are in a race against time,” said Rodrigue Vinet, senior Officer in charge of FAO’s program in the Philippines. “There is an immediate need for resources to help farmers clear their land and plant their crops. Therefore, we need to make the required purchases now and provide substantial resources directly to farmers to help them through this period.”

The Department of Agriculture had earlier requested that FAO support its cash-for-work scheme, covering more than 150,000 hectares and some 80 kilometers of communal irrigation canals.

Meanwhile, a mass campaign to vaccinate children in Tacloban – the city hardest hit by Yolanda – has begun in evacuation centers and in communities using mobile health teams with support from UN agencies.

The Department of Health, backed by the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF), the UN World Health Organization (WHO) and partners, plans to vaccinate more than 30,000 children under five years of age against polio and measles. They also received Vitamin A drops to help boost their immune systems.

UN staff carried supplies by hand from Manila to Tacloban, coordinated teams to give the vaccines and trained them on how to do it under these difficult circumstances.

According to Dr. Julie Hall, WHO Representative in the Philippines, it is “virtually unprecedented that within two and a half weeks of a disaster of this scale, with this level of devastation and these logistical challenges, that a mass vaccination campaign is already rolling out.”

The first phase that began on Wednesday is part of a wider campaign aimed at strengthening the health of young children in typhoon-affected areas.

FROM YOU TUBE: VIDEO BY SOS PHILIPPINES

''SOS Philippines'' - The song after the storm! [TYPHOON HAIYAN / YOLANDA] Armand TJ Armand TJ

 

Published on Nov 15, 2013 This original song has gone viral all over world to spread a message! The Filipinos still need your help. Here are a list of relief operations by my friends you can get in touch with:

http://www.gofundme.com/HelpforCapiz https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fb... (just comment on the picture to get in touch with Cecile Golez) https://www.facebook.com/LifeAfterYol... http://boatsforbusuanga.tumblr.com/ https://www.facebook.com/santaops

There's a global campaign to make this song become a movement for unity, not just for the Philippines, but for the whole world. To support this movement, we need to get this SOS out there as much as we can. Every share/repost/tweet/blog/tag will help make a difference and add fuel to the fire. Thank you for all those who are one with us, and one with the message to the world!

To send further donations to benefit the devastated areas, you may download the song from any of the links below. All downloads will support a fundraiser that helps the people rise up again in the long term.

On Itunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/sos... On Spotify: http://open.spotify.com/album/7ps838i... On Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00G...

To join the global campaign to get this song more viral world wide join the fb group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/SOSPh...

Our nation still needs more aid, and we're happy more help is on the way. Please spread this video to touch more hearts and souls around the world.

''The Filipino spirit is force of nature''

Please share this song and video on all social medias. You should hear these children's voices! They're from different parts of Panay island and Palawan, also hit by the storm. Please help us encourage more help/aid from the rest world, and to deliver a message of hope and solidarity to the Philippines and humanity.

The Filipino spirit is a force of nature, struggling to rise up. With all your help, we can survive this crisis. This song connects us all as one humanity, from our island, to the rest of the Visayas, the Philippines - and the rest of the world! Please ask all your friends to share. One Love! Thanks for those who contributed to delivering this SOS.

People from around the world have called the Philippines a Paradise on Earth. After the super typhoon, we are struggling to recover and save our Paradise. And that starts with our spirits and our smiles as we go through our daily efforts in picking up the pieces and addressing the emergencies at hand.

This song celebrates the spirit of the Filipino people rising up during this crisis, with the help of all of you around the world. Thank you for keeping us in your thoughts and prayers.

We are grateful, more help is on the way. We hope this song encourages more souls to reach out to our nation and help us in any way. Me and my fellow artists have poured our hearts, soul, sweat, blood, and tears, and traveled far to rush and put this song out there.

We finished this song and video without any directors, arrangers, producers, and videographers other than ourselves. The children learned the song on the same day as the recording. And came up with their own arrangement. Amazing!

The song was recorded in Iloilo (Also hit by the storm) the night after it was composed in Boracay. Aside from physical needs, our whole nation needs uplifting emotionally and spiritually. And we Filipinos do it best through music.

#SOSPhilippines (The Hashtag for all you netizens out there!)

For the story behind the song and video, here's the link below:

http://www.oneisland-oneworld.com/sos...

To get in touch with us:

Facebook: ''Like'' http://www.facebook.com/armandtjmusic Twitter: Follow https://twitter.com/armandtj

p.s. The singers in the video are students from CHJ and UPV (Iloilo and Miagao), UPV Choristers! I'm Atenean, and was part of the Ateneo College Glee Club. ;) -Armand

A version from London, UK: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3lu3FN...

A version from Iceland! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wCrVww...

Category Music License Standard YouTube License


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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