JUXTAPOSED: FORMER RIVAL JAPANESE, AMERICAN TROOPS RETURN TO LEYTE

PHOTO AT RIGHT: JAPANESE AID. Japanese military beside their Japanese Air Force C130 cargo plane after its arrival at Tacloban Airport on November 20, 2013. Mark Ralston/AFP Photo- This month of November, Japan Prime Minister Shinzo Abe dispatched 1,000 troops to the Philippines in the largest aid mission in Japan's military history.

ALSO: Rare good news from Tacloban: Whole family survives 'Yolanda'

Among the survivors are 47-year-old Glicer Natividad and his wife and two children, who were trapped inside their house in San Jose village in Tacloban City amid rapidly rising waters that were pushed from the sea by the typhoon. "Parang tsunami yata 'yun. Hindi man umabot nang five minutes, ang taas agad ng tubig, mga eight meters," Natividad said. " "Hindi kami makalabas kasi malakas 'yung current ng tubig," he added.


JUXTAPOSED: FORMER RIVAL JAPANESE, AMERICAN TROOPS RETURN TO LEYTE


Composite photos assembled by Facebook user Judd Romano.

TACLOBAN, DECEMBER 2, 2013 (PHILSTAR) PHILSTAR NEWS FEATURE BY  Camille Diola - Images from World War II in 1944 placed side by side with recent photos from Japan's and the United States' relief mission in the Philippines for super typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan) victims, revealing quaint similarities.

The photo, put together by Facebook user Judd Romano, went viral on the social network with over 9,000 shares as of Tuesday afternoon.

The 1944 picture of Japanese women bid a kamikaze aircraft goodbye as it departs to attack the Philippines is contrasted with a November 2013 photo showing troops waving goodbye at a plane headed for the Philippines.

This month, Japan Prime Minister Shinzo Abe dispatched 1,000 troops to the Philippines in the largest aid mission in Japan's military history.

Related: Japan to send 1,000 troops to Yolanda-ravaged Visayas

The East Asian nation fought against American troops in Leyte in what would be known as the Battle of Leyte Gulf, considered as the largest naval combat in World War II.

It was also on Leyte island that General Douglas MacArthur and his staff landed at Palo Beach on October 20, 1944, symbolizing the end of the war.

Also read: 1912 reports on Tacloban storm killing 15,000 resurface

"Today, Leyte is the site of both countries' largest relief operations ... Similarly, US Marines wade ashore in Leyte, not to wage war, but to lend a helping hand, liberating our people from a calamity that even a superpower cannot handle by itself," Romano, a Filipino working in Hiroshima, wrote.

"The world is different now. What was once enemies are now the strongest of allies," he added. - Camille Diola

Rare good news from Tacloban: Whole family survives 'Yolanda' By Louis Bacani (philstar.com) | Updated November 15, 2013 - 3:06pm 57 222 googleplus0 1


Tacloban City resident Glicer Natividad and his family were among the survivors of Super Typhoon "Yolanda" who have been flown to Metro Manila. AJ Bolando

MANILA, Philippines - Victims of Super Typhoon Yolanda who have been flown to the Villamor Airbase in Pasay City recalled how they survived the powerful howler that barreled through Visayas and generated deadly storm surges that swept communities.

Among the survivors are 47-year-old Glicer Natividad and his wife and two children, who were trapped inside their house in San Jose village in Tacloban City amid rapidly rising waters that were pushed from the sea by the typhoon.

"Parang tsunami yata 'yun. Hindi man umabot nang five minutes, ang taas agad ng tubig, mga eight meters," Natividad said. "

"Hindi kami makalabas kasi malakas 'yung current ng tubig," he added.

Natividad recalled that they clinged to their house's grills, roof, and even drums that floated on water.

"Tinalian ko agad para kung anumang mangyari, 'yun (drums) ang sasakyan namin."

When the waters receded and the powerful winds left, a city in ruins emerged after structures and houses were toppled by the typhoon.

In their village, Natividad said one house was carried away by the waters. Three children inside were killed.

'Yung mga bahay na kahoy, walang natira, puro washed out. Buti na lang sa amin merong concrete kahit kaunti," he said.

Though he is thankful that all in the family have survived, Natividad won't forget the diffult days of survival in their ravaged city.

"Kumakain kami ng basang bigas, lugaw, saging. Walang relief goods," he said.

And amid the devastation are children who are getting sick and people who are looting due to the lack of food and supplies.

"Parang ghost town ngayon ang Tacloban. Ang mga bahay at malalaking tindahan, niraransack ng mga tao kasi nagugutom lahat. Meron mang pera wala namang mabili," he said.

The dire condition prompted them to walk over 15 kilometers between their home and the city's ravaged airport, which they said was the only area where some relief goods were intially placed.

"'Yung madadaanan mo, ang daming patay. Ang baho ng kalsada namin ngayon, hindi pa kinukuha ang mga bangkay," Natividad said.

No warnings on storm surges, 'mismanaged' gov't efforts

Natividad said he harbors ill feelings against the government for the lapses in handling the situation.

His 19-year-old daughter Ronna Mae said there were even no warnings from authorities on the storm surges before the typhoon hit land.

"Hindi kasi na-inform doon na parang may malakas na tubig na darating. Kaya iyon. Walang lumikas kasi kala namin, bagyo lang na may malakas na ulan at hangin. Hindi kami na-inform na may mangagaling [na tubig mula] sa dagat," she said.

Her father also claimed that days after the calamity, relief aid has yet to reach their area.

"Pagkatapos ng bagyo hanggang ngayon, walang dumarating na tulong doon," he said.

Even in the Tacloban airport, Natividad said there seems to be no system. He claimed that no government official has shown up but militarymen have provided the typhoon victims with biscuits and water.

"Pumila kami sa airport, walang nagmamanage kung saan kami papunta," he said. "Pagdating ng C-130, agawan agad ang mga tao sa pagsakay. Nagtutulakan na."

Natividad and his family arrived in Metro Manila on Thursday aboard a C-130 plane. With a damaged home and an unclear future, they will be seeking refuge in a relative's house in Pasig City for the meantime.

But Natividad said they will still return to their home city.

 
VIDEO: WHOLE FAMILY SURVIVES YOLANDA


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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