DEATH TOLL, AS OF NOV. 20, 4,011

WRECKED TACLOBAN CHAPEL, 10 BODIES AND A FATHER'S PAIN

"This is my son," says Nestor Librando, a red-eyed, 31-year-old carpenter. "He drowned."

ALSO: UN official: 7.8 million women, children need protection in wake of 'Yolanda'

But while relief efforts are gathering pace every day and are reaching more people, Amos said many areas outside Tacloban City have yet to receive aid, including those that are further inland, in the mountains and on many smaller islands still unreached.

ALSO: ‘Yolanda’ death toll now over 4,000

President Aquino had earlier estimated the death toll at around 2,500 during an interview with international media network CNN.


WRECKED TACLOBAN CHAPEL, 10 BODIES AND A FATHER'S PAIN


Serving as a morgue, St. Michael The Archangel Chapel sits among debris from Typhoon Haiyan in Tacloban, central Philippines, Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2013. There is no functioning morgue here, so people have been collecting the dead and storing them where they can â?� in this case, St. Michael The Archangel Chapel. AP/Wally Santana

TACLOBAN, NOVEMBER 21, 2013 (PHILSTAR) By Todd Pitman — There is no functioning morgue here, so people have been collecting the dead from Typhoon Haiyan and storing them where they can — in this case, St. Michael The Archangel Chapel.

Ten bodies have been placed on wooden pews and across a pale white floor slick with blood, debris and water. One appears to have foamed at the mouth. One has been wrapped in a white sheet, tied to a thick green bamboo pole so that people could carry it, and placed on the floor.

One body is small, and entirely covered in a red blanket.

"This is my son," says Nestor Librando, a red-eyed, 31-year-old carpenter. "He drowned."

Librando had taken refuge in a military compound nearby by the time the typhoon's storm surge poured in Friday morning. For two hours, the water rose around him. He held his 2-year-old son in one arm, his 3-year-old son in the other.

But the torrent proved too strong, and swept the family out of the building. The water rose above Librando's head and he struggled to swim. His younger son slipped from his hands and was immediately pulled under the water.

"I found his body later, behind the house" in the courtyard, sunken in the mud, he says.

"This is the worst thing I've ever seen in my life, the worst thing I could imagine," Librando says. "I brought him to this chapel because there was nowhere else to take him. I wanted Jesus Christ to bless him."

The chapel is close to the Tacloban airport, in an area where the storm felled and shredded a vast bank of trees. The water moved with such force that light poles beside a dirt road are bent to the ground at right angles.

At a lakeshore west of the airport terminal, three bodies lay among the rocks. A man, wearing blue shorts and lying face down. A child with yellowed arms grasping skyward. A tiny baby, sprawled on its back.

More bodies lay along a muddy beach nearby. A dead man in jeans leans forward, his head in the water, his back feet somehow perched frozen above the sand and mud behind. Beside him, a child in a diaper lays partially covered by a palm frond, beside wood, debris and a green crate labeled San Miguel Brewery.

There are survivors here, too, including 22-year-old Junick de la Rea. He says the water swept him and five of his relatives off a rooftop where they had fled, but they all survived by grabbing a bunch of plastic and metal containers that happened to float by.

"Please, can you help me?" de la Rea asks a reporter. "I want you to send a message to a friend of mine," a friend who works for the German Red Cross Union.

His message: "We survived. I want to say we survived. ... We lost everything. But we are still alive — and we need help."

UN official: 7.8 million women, children need protection in wake of 'Yolanda' By Louis Bacani (philstar.com) | Updated November 20, 2013 - 11:54am 21 8 googleplus0 0


Typhoon victims are turned back from a departing evacuation flight due to lack of space at the airport in Tacloban, Philippines, Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013. Hundreds of thousands of people were displaced by Typhoon Haiyan, which tore across several islands in the eastern Philippines on Nov. 8. AP/Wally Santana

MANILA, Philippines - Philippine government efforts are now picking pace after days of slow relief operations, but millions of "Yolanda" victims, particularly women and children, are now in need of protection against abuse, United Nations humanitarian chief Valerie Amos said.

Amos, also the UN emergency relief coordinator, went back to Tacloban City on Tuesday exactly a week after her first visit when she was appalled by the typhoon devastation and distressed by the slow delivery of relief assistance.

"Today was very different. The relief operation has been scaled up substantially," Amos said. "People are making every effort to rebuild their lives and the early signs of entrepreneurialism are all there, with women cooking and selling food, others removing debris or providing other support in the community."

"National and local Government efforts, supported by the international community, are paying off," she added.

But while relief efforts are gathering pace every day and are reaching more people, Amos said many areas outside Tacloban City have yet to receive aid, including those that are further inland, in the mountains and on many smaller islands still unreached.

Amos reported that 2.5 million typhoon victims need food assistance while ensuring safe drinking water remains a challenge in many areas.

"With over 500,000 homes completely destroyed, the need for emergency shelter and basic protection for women, for children, remains," Amos said.

The UN official said an estimated 3.2 million women and 4.6 million children need psychosocial support and protection against violence, trafficking and exploitation.

This comes amid reports of violence and rape in areas hit by the super typhoon.

"Pregnant women, new mothers and other vulnerable groups also need special care," Amos said.

Amos also reported that significant food and medical assistance have been provided to the typhoon victims while water services and limited telecommunications services have been restored.

She said UN humanitarian partners have estimated that they have reached just over 1.1 million people with food aid. Water bladders and water treatment points have also been installed to provide clean drinking water to thousands of people in Capiz, northern Cebu and Roxas City.

The Philippine government has also distributed 837,900 food packs in the affected areas, Amos said.

But despite the misery caused by "Yolanda," the UN official said she is awed by the resilience of Filipinos in times of disasters.

"I continue to be struck by the resilience and spirit of the Filipino people. Everywhere I visited, I saw families determined to rebuild their lives under the most difficult conditions," she said.

‘Yolanda’ death toll now over 4,000 By Julliane Love De Jesus INQUIRER.net 12:14 pm | Wednesday, November 20th, 2013 15 133 18


http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/files/2013/11/yolanda-death.jpg
Residents stand beside dead bodies that lie on the street after powerful Typhoon Haiyan slammed into Tacloban city, Leyte province central Philippines on Saturday, Nov. 9, 2013. AP FILE PHOTO

MANILA, Philippines–The number of bodies recovered from areas devastated by Supertyphoon “Yolanda” (international name: Haiyan) has reached more than 4,000.

In the latest bulletin of the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC) issued on Wednesday, the death toll was raised to 4,011.

President Aquino had earlier estimated the death toll at around 2,500 during an interview with international media network CNN.

The NDRRMC said around two million families or nearly 10 million people were affected by Yolanda, which was recorded as one of the strongest typhoons to hit land in history. At least 3,310 of the death toll came from the province of Leyte, where storm surges engulfed coastal communities.

As of 6 a.m., the number of injured increased to 18,557 while 1,602 remained unaccounted for. The supertyphoon also wrought damages to agricultural products and infrastructure worth about P12 billion and affected 10,716 villages in 44 provinces.

Meanwhile, based on the inspection of the National Grid Corporation of the Philippines, 566 transmission towers and poles were toppled and seven substations shut down.


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

© Copyright, 2013 by PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE
All rights reserved


PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE [PHNO] WEBSITE