UN HUMANITARIAN CHIEF CONTINUES TO BE AMAZED BY FILIPINOS' RESILIENCY

“I continue to be struck by the resiliency of the Filipino people,” Valerie Ann Amos said at a United Nations press briefing at The Peninsula Manila Tuesday evening. “Everywhere I visited, I saw families determined to rebuild their lives under the most difficult of conditions,” said Amos, who also served as UN Emergency Relief Coordinator.

ALSO: UN humanitarian chief lauds PH relief efforts for ‘Yolanda’ victims

On Wednesday, Amos will visit Tacloban City, one of the areas severely affected by the supertyphoon, to meet emergency workers on the ground as well as the survivors of Yolanda.

ALSO: 1912 reports on Tacloban storm 'killing' 15,000 resurface

An old front page of the defunct Washington Herald resurfaced online running a story headlined "15,000 die in Philippine storm" and citing flattened out cities. The newspaper is among many others archived the US Library of Congress' National Endowment for the Humanities website that published other accounts of the catastrophe 101 years ago.

UN HUMANITARIAN CHIEF CONTINUES TO BE AMAZED BY FILIPINOS' RESILIENCY


http://globalnation.inquirer.net/files/2013/11/Valerie-Amos.jpg

MANILA, NOVEMBER 20, 2013 (INQUIRER) By Bong Lozada - After returning from Yolanda-struck Tacloban, United Nations Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs said she was also struck, this time, by the resiliency of the Filipinos.

“I continue to be struck by the resiliency of the Filipino people,” Valerie Ann Amos said at a United Nations press briefing at The Peninsula Manila Tuesday evening.

“Everywhere I visited, I saw families determined to rebuild their lives under the most difficult of conditions,” said Amos, who also served as UN Emergency Relief Coordinator.

“I would like to ensure them and the Philippine government that the UN and the international community continue the stand,” she added.

She said the relief efforts has improved since aid arrived after Yolanda’s devastation with “early signs of entrepreneurship” sprouting in Tacloban.

“People, to the extent, are traumatized but at the same time they are trying to look into the future so it’s important to support them.”

“Today was different, relief effort has scaled up substantially and people are making an effort to rebuild their lives,” Amos said.

“There are women cooking, selling food, and other people are removing debris.”

Distributed goals

Amos said humanitarian partners of the UN have reached 1.1 million people with food aid and the Philippine government has distributed 837, 900 food packs in the affected areas.

“My office, the UN Office for the Coordination of Human Affairs, is setting up a coordination hub in Guiuan,” Amos said.

Coordination hubs will also be located in Tacloban, Roxas, Ormoc and Cebu.

Amos said these hubs will be aided by local officials so as not to duplicate relief efforts.

To further improve the relief effort, Amos said cash-for-work programs are essential to help the people and encourage them to move on their own and not to rely on relief too much.

UN humanitarian chief lauds PH relief efforts for ‘Yolanda’ victims By Julliane Love de Jesus - DAILY INQUIRER NOVEMBER 20, 2013

MANILA, Philippines – United Nations Humanitarian chief Valerie Amos commended the government for its relief efforts under “extremely challenging circumstance,” following the massive destruction brought by supertyphoon “Yolanda” (international name: Haiyan) last week.

Amos, the emergency relief coordinator and UN under secretary-general for humanitarian affairs, said “I commend the Philippines Government for their relief efforts so far, under extremely challenging circumstances, and hope the international community will give generously to the humanitarian response.”

Amos issued the statement amid criticisms that there were no or not enough relief goods and that relief efforts were disorganized.

Amos, who arrived in the Philippines on Tuesday, assured in a statement that the UN and its partner agencies would continue supporting the government and the Filipino people “in any way required –now and in the longer-term.”

On Wednesday, Amos will visit Tacloban City, one of the areas severely affected by the supertyphoon, to meet emergency workers on the ground as well as the survivors of Yolanda.

“Millions of families have had their lives torn apart by Typhoon Haiyan. They have lost everything and desperately need help now. I am concerned that there are thousands of people who need help that we have not been able to reach. The scale of the destruction is shocking. We must make every effort to reach people,” she said.

As part of her itinerary, Amos is set to meet President Benigno Aquino III, government officials and representatives of the humanitarian community in the country.

She participated in the launch of the $301 million humanitarian response plan to cover immediate life-saving humanitarian needs for the millions of people who have been left devastated by the disaster.
The National Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC) reported Wednesday 2,275 dead with 3,665 injured and 80 missing.

United Nations Under-Secretary General for Humanitarian Affairs, Valerie Amos, centre, speaks to survivors at the airport in Tacloban, Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2013 in Tacloban city, Leyte province, central Philippines.

Typhoon Haiyan, one of the strongest storms on record, slammed into 6 central Philippine islands on Friday leaving a wide swath of destruction and thousands of people dead. AP

from the philstar

1912 reports on Tacloban storm 'killing' 15,000 resurface By Camille Diola (philstar.com) | Updated November 19, 2013 - 12:52pm 180 16.1K googleplus3 12


The Washington Herald issue in November 20, 1912 published an article about a powerful typhoon that pounded on Tacloban and Capiz. Oklahoma-based newspaper Daily Armoreite also ran an October 1912 story of a storm that damaged Tacloban and surrounding areas.

MANILA, Philippines - An old front page of the defunct Washington Herald resurfaced online running a story headlined "15,000 die in Philippine storm" and citing flattened out cities.

"The typhoon swept the Visayas and is said to have practically destroyed Tacloban, the capital city of Leyte, and to have wrought enormous damage and loss of life at Capiz," the news story reads, citing a cable dispatch to the United States Bureau of Insular Affairs.

The extreme weather event in November 26, 1912 seemed to have repeated itself 101 years after, when another severe typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan) slammed onto the region and heavily devastated Tacloban City and Capiz, among others, on November 8 this year.

"That 15,000 persons were probably killed and wounded in a typhoon ... probably half the population of the two cities had been lost," the report says, without making no distinction between the general casualties and fatalities.

The report continued with an account of the damage in the areas--descriptions similar to those of the aftermath of super-typhoon Yolanda.

"All telegraphic communication has been destroyed, and it is impossible to get other than vague reports of the extent of the disaster. That Tacloban has suffered an enormous loss of life is believed to be certain," it said. It also recounted the truckload of food, clothing and medical supplies rushed to the scene.

The newspaper is among many others archived the US Library of Congress' National Endowment for the Humanities website that published other accounts of the catastrophe.

New York-based daily Oswego Palladium (now Palladium Times) also reported on 15,000 casualties in the deadly typhoon.

A page from the Oswego Palladium's November 29, 1912 issue. Get Real Philippines

"Tacloban is destroyed," the story deck in the November 29, 1912 issue reads. It included an account of the powerful cyclone's track following its inception over the Pacific Ocean.

"The typhoon swept from the East in a southerly direction crossing the island of Leyte ... going to Panay and whirling South, causing great damage along the coast of Mindanao," the article reads.

The November 1912 storm was preceded by a lesser powerful, albeit similarly destructive, storm October 16 that year, as cited by daily publications Amarillo Daily News, Daily Armoreite and the New Ulm Review.

Several American dailies reported a devastating typhoon in October 1912 that also struck Tacloban.

The reports estimated that the cyclone caused a sizeable $25 million in damage especially of agricultural plantations.

Also read: American football player carries Philippine flag upside down

"The storm extended over a wide area, touching Surigao in the south, Tacloban in the north and crossing Leyte, Bohol, Cebu, Negros and Panay.

In 1912, the country was under the American occupation and a war between American forces and Philippine revolutionaries was being fought.


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