[IN THE AFTERMATH OF YOLANDA,  TO THE SURVIVORS, HELPLESS AND SUFFERING:
Do not be afraid for God is always in charge. Faith is stronger than fear.
God is helping you carry your heavy cross"
AT PHNO WE ARE THINKING AND PRAYING FOR YOU ALL EVERYDAY]


POWER SUPPLY BACK IN EASTERN VISAYAS BY CHRISTMAS - ENERGY CHIEF PETILLA

Petilla made this promise in a speech after a flag raising ceremony held in front of the municipal hall of Palo town in Leyte, one of the areas severely hit by super typhoon “Yolanda,” said Radyo Inquirer 990AM reporter Chona Yu. “Ang sabi nya (Petilla) sa salitang Waray, ‘Ipupusta ko ang position ko na by December 24, on or before Christmas, maibabalik ko yung supply ng kuryente sa Eastern Visayas,’” said Yu, who was also present at the flag raising.

ALSO: GUIUAN GROCER FORGIVES LOOTERS

CHINESE GROCER Tan lost P10 million worth of goods, most of which she had purchased on loans. The losses have not turned her bitter. Instead, she opened what remains of her store to people seeking to talk to their loved ones, allowing them the make three-minute calls provided for free by Smart Communications.

ALSO: LATEST DEATH TOLL: 3,976 FROM NDRRMC

National: 3,976 confirmed deaths, 1,598 missing and 18,175 injured, according to the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council.

 

ALSO: WHO WARNS OF DISEASE OUTBREAK

 

(WHO) on Monday warned that infectious diseases could break out in areas flattened by Super typhoon Yolanda (international name Haiyan).Dr. Julie Lyn Hall said a measles outbreak could happen in the next few weeks because almost all of the medical facilities in Eastern Visayas particularly in Tacloban City were devastated by the typhoon.


 

POWER SUPPLY BACK IN EASTERN VISAYAS BY CHRISTMAS - ENERGY CHIEF PETILLA


http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/files/2013/11/yolanda-tacloban-night.jpg
This picture taken on November 16, 2013 shows typhoon victims sitting around a table inside their partially damaged house at night in Tanauan on the outskirts of Tacloban. AFP FILE PHOTO

MANILA, NOVEMBER 19, 2013 (INQUIRER) Energy Secretary Jericho Petilla on Monday vowed to restore power supply in Eastern Visayas by Christmas.

Petilla made this promise in a speech after a flag raising ceremony held in front of the municipal hall of Palo town in Leyte, one of the areas severely hit by super typhoon “Yolanda,” said Radyo Inquirer 990AM reporter Chona Yu.

“Ang sabi nya (Petilla) sa salitang Waray, ‘Ipupusta ko ang position ko na by December 24, on or before Christmas, maibabalik ko yung supply ng kuryente sa Eastern Visayas,’” said Yu, who was also present at the flag raising.

Petilla was former governor of Leyte before he was appointed by President Benigno Aquino III to head the Department of Energy.

Yu said employees were required to attend the flag raising ceremony because the President, Interior Secretary Mar Roxas and other local officials were in town to look after the plight of the typhoon victims.

But she said the municipal hall itself was also destroyed by the typhoon so the employees had to make do with the only room at the ground floor spared by the typhoon.

In the evening, a free movie will be shown in front of the municipal hall to give temporary entertainment for the typhoon victims, Yu further said still quoting Petilla.

Guiuan grocer forgives looters By Niña P. Calleja Philippine Daily Inquirer 12:39 am | Monday, November 18th, 2013


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Typhoon Haiyan survivors walk at the destroyed port in the town of Guiuan, Eastern Samar, Friday, Nov. 15, 2013. Three days after the typhoon struck last Nov. 8, Susan Tan’s grocery store and warehouse in Guiuan were ransacked by hungry townsmen and she lost P10 million worth of goods. But she has opted to forgive them, she said, blaming the government instead for its slow response to the needs of the typhoon victims. AP PHOTO/DAVID GUTTENFELDER

GUIUAN, Eastern Samar—For Susan Tan, it was a case of forgive and forget.

The 43-year-old grocer of Chinese descent said she was shocked and disappointed to see friends, government employees and even policemen among those who ransacked her grocery store and warehouse after Supertyphoon “Yolanda” flattened the town at the edge of the Pacific Ocean.

She did not take it against the looters but instead pinned the blame on the government’s slow response to the worst disaster ever to hit Guiuan, site of a US-built air and naval base from where US Gen. Douglas MacArthur launched the allied offensive against the Japanese in the final stages of World War II.

Tan recounted that she and her employees were still able to sell goods on Saturday and Sunday after the typhoon, packing peak winds of more than 270 kilometers per hour, smashed across the coastal town from the Pacific on its first landfall.

The looting started on Monday at 8 a.m. The food shelves were cleaned first. And then the chairs, furniture and fixtures.
“I was there watching and I couldn’t do anything to stop the mob,” she said in an interview at the now empty store with only a few shelves left.

“Everybody knew everybody here. There were government employees, policemen and even my friends,” she said recounting that one policeman was even wearing his uniform.

Then her warehouse was pillaged, along with other small and big stores in Guiuan, a tranquil seaside town before the monster typhoon turned it into a wasteland.

She was already planning to give away her goods to the municipal hall, thinking her warehouse would be sacked anyway.
The local government had even sent her a military escort to help her bring three truckloads of goods to the municipal hall. But after the soldiers left, the mobs descended on the warehouse.

Forgive and forget

Tan lost P10 million worth of goods, most of which she had purchased on loans. The losses have not turned her bitter.

Instead, she opened what remains of her store to people seeking to talk to their loved ones, allowing them the make three-minute calls provided for free by Smart Communications.

In the first week after the typhoon, a long queue of residents lined up outside her thrashed store, hoping to get a chance to make a call.

Asked why she opted to stay, she said: “There’s nothing you can do but help. I’ll just forgive and forget.”

She said helping her fellow Guiuanons helped her regain her sanity after the typhoon.

Tan turned emotional recounting an encounter with one looter. “I was standing behind her back. She was sitting there, tired from the looting,” she said. “She saw me and said: ‘Thank you.’ I almost cried.”

When the looter told her it was the birthday of her child, she found herself telling her, “You get some more.”
Tan blamed the slow government response for the looting.

“People panicked. They thought no relief was coming. There was no single word from the government,” she said.

Had the people been assured that assistance was forthcoming, they would not have dared resort to looting.

The typhoon spared no one and no place, with roofs, walls and appliances flying everywhere. At least 99 of Guiuan’s 47,000 residents perished in the typhoon.

Renee Patron, a Filipino-American, said the residents knew the typhoon was coming. But she asked, “Who can prepare for the worst?”

Latest on deaths, damage in typhoon Yolanda Associated Press 8:57 pm | Monday, November 18th, 2013

MANILA, Philippines – Here are the latest casualty figures and damage reports from the Philippines after Typhoon Yolanda (international name Haiyan), according to the national crisis management agency.

— National: 3,976 confirmed deaths, 1,598 missing and 18,175 injured, according to the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council.

— Eastern Visayas region covering the islands of Leyte and Samar: 3,725 dead, 17,821 injured and 1,574 missing. Widespread severe damage. Tacloban, Leyte’s main city with a population of 220,000, lies in ruins. Communications, transport cut in many areas.

— Western Visayas region: 161 dead, 228 injured, 19 missing.

— Central Visayas region, which includes Cebu: 74 dead, 102 injured and 5 missing.

— Other regions: 16 dead, 24 injured.

WHO warns of disease outbreak November 18, 2013 10:31 pm by RITCHIE A. HORARIO REPORTER


A resident points to a cadaver unearthed after tombs were swept away during the storm surge in the town of Hernani, Eastern Samar. AFP PHOTOS

THE World Health Organization (WHO) on Monday warned that infectious diseases could break out in areas flattened by Super typhoon Yolanda (international name Haiyan).

Dr. Julie Lyn Hall said a measles outbreak could happen in the next few weeks because almost all of the medical facilities in Eastern Visayas particularly in Tacloban City were devastated by the typhoon.

She said the Department of Health (DOH), in coordination with WHO, will conduct a massive vaccination program to protect children against measles and polio.

“Only a few percentage of the children in the affected areas were vaccinated to fight measles, and so they should be vaccinated,” Hall said.

She added that at least 24,000 babies will be born this month.

“That’s a lot of babies that need to be delivered in clean conditions,” she said.

Hall called for the immediate restoration of birthing facilities to provide health care for newborns in the typhoon-ravaged provinces.

The United Nations Population Fund (UNPFA) said that some 230,000 pregnant women affected by the typhoon face higher risks of acquiring diseases.

“They urgently need assistance, particularly the restoration of maternal and newborn health services,” the UNPFA said.

The UNPF said that around 900 babies are born every day in the storm-hit areas. Mothers deliver their babies in makeshift clinics in the absence of functioning medical facilities and skilled birth attendants.

According to the group, each day, approximately 130 of these mothers will experience potentially life-threatening complications.

“In these situations, the sudden loss of medical support puts women and their newborns at higher risk of death or injury,” Genevieve Ah-sue, acting UNPFA representative in the Philippines, said.

The UNPFA said about 157,000 mothers who gave birth in the past six months as well as their babies need medical care.

“Babies continue to be born even in emergencies like this one, and women have to give birth without access to even the most basic essentials for safety delivery,” said Ah-sue.

As part of the United Nation’s (UN) Humanitarian Action Plan for Typhoon Yolanda, the UNPFA is releasing P172 million to restore health services, including maternal and newborn care.


Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

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